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  1. Miles Gibbons

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    Some of the newer pads, like the VAD floor tom or digital snare have more sensors. This means they are capable of more accurate positional sensing, which replicates the different tonalities a drum provides depending on where you strike the head. This also provides more dynamic accuracy and sensitivity away from the center of the head. Also, some of the new pads feature a triple-ply cross woven mesh. Extra plies of mesh mean greater triggering accuracy, because they aren't vibrating extraneously, and a more authentic acoustic-style feel.

    There's also been a focus on larger pads with more acoustic-style profiles - either full sized shells from the VAD line, or "regular" pads with a larger diameter and more realistic rim placement\height. The benefit here is restricted to feel of course, but it helps.

    The new digital pads feature electrostatic sensors, which sense things like your hand resting on the drum (no more misfiring cross-stick samples, and you can mute the ride with a finger tip etc). These pads are a lot more sensitive, but of course you only access the benefits of that sensitivity with an appropriately capable module.

    The biggest changes over time are found within the modules - more realistic samples, more sophisticated sound engines that "select" and process those samples according to your performance, and greater editing capabilities. USB Interfaces are becoming the norm, as is Bluetooth. That said, even small factors, like the harness\mount that keep the sensor cone in place under the head make a difference in triggering accuracy in reliability. Keep in mind a lot of the pads last longer than the modules they are introduced with... the PD-8 for example was used on iterations of the TD-9, TD-11, TD-15 and TD-17 kits, long after the first of those was discontinued.

    The actual triggering technology that all manufacturers use has stayed pretty much the same since the inception of the digital drum... there have been improvements to the sensors, mounts, etc, but the actual technology is basically the same (other than the aforementioned digital pads, unique to Roland).

    I'm not sure about the states, but there have been many price jumps in the Canadian music instrument retail industry in the last decade... some of them pretty significant. Obviously inflation is always a factor, but gear is getting pricey regardless.
    Last edited by MilesAway; 02-23-2021 at 01:59 PM. Reason: spelling\grammar
    "I'm gonna sleep outside... it's like Earth here, except less pollution, and more moons"

  2. Miles Gibbons

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    Quote Originally Posted by j kuhl View Post
    With a decent interface, a program like superior drummer 3 and some patience and effort, some amazingly lifelike drum sounds can be triggered with those old kits. This is a td12 but you get the idea and can see how much better vsts sound.

    https://youtu.be/SiNhJABnfHc
    True that... they are finally rolling out MIDI 2.0 - I'm excited to see the possibilities - but before this, MIDI has remain unchanged for decades, so the protocols work perfectly when connecting old kits to new software.
    "I'm gonna sleep outside... it's like Earth here, except less pollution, and more moons"

  3. Dalmi Joedi - Jedi

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    Sep 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by MilesAway View Post
    Some of the newer pads, like the VAD floor tom or digital snare have more sensors. This means they are capable of more accurate positional sensing, which replicates the different tonalities a drum provides depending on where you strike the head. This also provides more dynamic accuracy and sensitivity away from the center of the head. Also, some of the new pads feature a triple-ply cross woven mesh. Extra plies of mesh mean greater triggering accuracy, because they aren't vibrating extraneously, and a more authentic acoustic-style feel.

    There's also been a focus on larger pads with more acoustic-style profiles - either full sized shells from the VAD line, or "regular" pads with a larger diameter and more realistic rim placement\height. The benefit here is restricted to feel of course, but it helps.

    The new digital pads feature electrostatic sensors, which sense things like your hand resting on the drum (no more misfiring cross-stick samples, and you can mute the ride with a finger tip etc). These pads are a lot more sensitive, but of course you only access the benefits of that sensitivity with an appropriately capable module.

    The biggest changes over time are found within the modules - more realistic samples, more sophisticated sound engines that "select" and process those samples according to your performance, and greater editing capabilities. USB Interfaces are becoming the norm, as is Bluetooth. That said, even small factors, like the harness\mount that keep the sensor cone in place under the head make a difference in triggering accuracy in reliability. Keep in mind a lot of the pads last longer than the modules they are introduced with... the PD-8 for example was used on iterations of the TD-9, TD-11, TD-15 and TD-17 kits, long after the first of those was discontinued.

    The actual triggering technology that all manufacturers use has stayed pretty much the same since the inception of the digital drum... there have been improvements to the sensors, mounts, etc, but the actual technology is basically the same (other than the aforementioned digital pads, unique to Roland).

    I'm not sure about the states, but there have been many price jumps in the Canadian music instrument retail industry in the last decade... some of them pretty significant. Obviously inflation is always a factor, but gear is getting pricey regardless.
    Thanks for this. Iím getting for super cheap in comparison and itís in almost new condition. Iím getting it tomorrow at 10:30am in BKLYN.

  4. Dalmi Joedi - Jedi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Here is my TD-10 with the TDW expansion card.
    This setup is very outdated but I have it dialed in.
    Is the Roland you are getting similar to this at all ?
    Why do you say itís outdated?

  5. Registered User

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    What would you say .. Ya do here?
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    Quote Originally Posted by j kuhl View Post
    With a decent interface, a program like superior drummer 3 and some patience and effort, some amazingly lifelike drum sounds can be triggered with those old kits. This is a td12 but you get the idea and can see how much better vsts sound.

    https://youtu.be/SiNhJABnfHc
    Wow - HUGE improvement in sound!
    Quote Originally Posted by dexplosion View Post
    Boom stands are for sissies.

  6. A Passion Play ...

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    Jul 2004
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    Sacramento CA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dale w miller View Post
    Why do you say it’s outdated?
    Outdated module for sure. The pads are 10+ Years
    old themselves. Still a solid rig and very fun to play.
    Just a little long in the tooth. Kinda like me I guess.
    Eric G : Pearl,pAiSTe,Remo,Vic Firth,SKB,Roc n Soc,Roland V-Drums. Masters MCX Chestnut fade.
    22"x18",10"x8",12"x9",16"x16". Ian Paice Snare. Why not ...

  7. Registered User

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    Mar 2010
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    Do you guys find that with an eKit you practice more than or less than you normally would, regardless of the technology? Of course, the ability to practice/play day or night, in a house or apartment(or wherever) is very advantageous. Talking to some though, they would argue that because you're hitting mess/rubber pads, you aren't getting the true feel of an actual drum, therefore..not very worthy. As far as practicing goes, you can probably save money by purchasing the Black Hole heads or Aquarian Superpads(?) that fit on/over the heads. I fight with myself often, as to whether I'd rather have an eKit, or just the heads to put over top to minimize the sound.
    Not wanting/trying to hijack the thread, just expressing a thought on the subject, and am curious what everyone's opinions are.
    KG

  8. Miles Gibbons

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    Quote Originally Posted by KG View Post
    Do you guys find that with an eKit you practice more than or less than you normally would, regardless of the technology? Of course, the ability to practice/play day or night, in a house or apartment(or wherever) is very advantageous. Talking to some though, they would argue that because you're hitting mess/rubber pads, you aren't getting the true feel of an actual drum, therefore..not very worthy. As far as practicing goes, you can probably save money by purchasing the Black Hole heads or Aquarian Superpads(?) that fit on/over the heads. I fight with myself often, as to whether I'd rather have an eKit, or just the heads to put over top to minimize the sound.
    Not wanting/trying to hijack the thread, just expressing a thought on the subject, and am curious what everyone's opinions are.
    KG
    Muffling devices would cost less, but they defeat the benefits of practicing on an acoustic kit - they completely change the feel, and don't allow you to work on your touch\sound production any more than V-Drums (or a practice pad) would. You're still not actually playing your drums, if they have those rubber pads or Black Holes on them.

    I have V-Drums set up at home, and share a small practice lockout with a few other drummers - there is a kit there that we all use. I try to get to the practice room at least 4 times a week, and practice at home otherwise. I focus on my touch in the lockout, and work on less "tactile" things at home, like co-ordination or learning new music. There is still crossover - I try to be cognizant of dynamics, fluidity of motion and technique on any type of kit.

    I don't practice more because of the V-Drums, but they enable me - without them, I'd be stuck on a practice pad in my apartment.
    "I'm gonna sleep outside... it's like Earth here, except less pollution, and more moons"

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