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  1. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Default Audio I/F with DSP effects

    Hi everyone,

    Im in the proccess of getting gear for my drums studio. Everytihng from mics to cables... and to an Audio Interface. Although Im interested in recording, my question is not about that, but about taking advantage og the gear while practicing. In my head, it makes sense to practice monitoring a mix made our whats captured by the mics through the audio interface. Some audio interfaces have built-in dsp mixers that allow you to apply effects (EQ, compression, reverb, etc...) with very low latency, something I can use while playing regardless of whether if Im recording or not. That way, I can practice with mics placements, effects, different sounds without having to record and, more importantly, without dealing with latency issues. I also know that I can approach the same problem using a mixer with USB multitrack interface and even daisy-chaining a regular mixer to an audio interface.

    So, my questions are mainly two: Does it make any sense what I described above or will I end up figuring out that the better way to practice is hearing the naked signal from my drums? And, if it makes any sense, what would be the better approach? Some advice in terms of gear would also be welcomed (always keeping in mind I dont plan to bust the bank).

    Thanks everyone in advance.

    Cheers.

  2. Experienced Noob

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    Default

    I wouldn't recommend doing what you are proposing for a few reasons, the biggest being that even if you use in-ears, you are going to have the live sound bleeding in to the headphone sound, making all the effects rather pointless. Doing something like this with (for examples) vocals is one thing but with a very loud instrument like drums it likely won't work out so well.

    Further, when you get to recording I would not recommend using your interface/mixer's effects on the way in. You will be stuck with baked in effects that you may well not like or wish you could tweak. If you are working in a DAW, I always recommend applying effects only to previously recorded tracks, not when they are being recorded.

    But, it will be your gear, so try & do what makes you happy!

  3. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Default

    Mike, thanks for your reply. That is the kind of advice based on practical experience I was hoping to get. I know is my gear, but being cost-conscious as I have to be I prefer not to pay more for features that, as you say, I would end up not using.

    Thanks.

  4. Experienced Noob

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    Quote Originally Posted by os32za View Post
    Mike, thanks for your reply. That is the kind of advice based on practical experience I was hoping to get. I know is my gear, but being cost-conscious as I have to be I prefer not to pay more for features that, as you say, I would end up not using.

    Thanks.
    Mixers with built in effects are great for live performances. For recording, probably not so much. Record your tracks dry, then add effects in the mix. You'll most likely end up a lot happier in the end that way.

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