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  1. Drumming Since 1943

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    NJ
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    18,679

    Default Best Product for Simple Cleaning?

    So I was looking at my drums the other day and realized a) they’re pretty smudgy and b) I’ve never actually cleaned a drum before.

    What is the best product to do so? Needs to be mild and work on the lacquer and the painted hardware. Any advice is appreciated.
    Way Too Much Crap

  2. A Passion Play ...

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Sacramento CA.
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    Trick drum polish is good but a little expensive. I have had great results with a 50/50 of vinegar and water.
    Mild mixture of dish soap and water with a microfiber cloth works good too. All these will do the job.
    You can experiment with some furniture polishes as well. Spray some on a cloth and try it under your kick
    drum and see how it works. These are some of the products I have used. All the best and please be safe. You can also use Windex and Formula 409. These have no ammonia in them.
    Last edited by Eric; 04-04-2020 at 10:47 AM.
    Eric G : Pearl,pAiSTe,Remo,Vic Firth,SKB,Roc n Soc,Roland V-Drums. Masters MCX Chestnut fade.
    22"x18",10"x8",12"x9",16"x16". Ian Paice Snare. Why not ...

  3. Registered User

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    Feb 2003
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    phx-az since 1978. The best sunsets occur during the monsoon season June-Sept.
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    613

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    Martin Guitar Polish. I use it on all my Lacquer finishes. Great for drum shells. I do the chrome with non ammonia window cleaner.
    "Now just a minute. This is a press conference. The last thing I want to do is answer a lot of questions."

    United States Army General Maynard M. Mitchell
    Press briefing. Korea 1950

  4. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Charlotte, N.C.
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    2,382

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    I second the Trick Drum Polish recommendation.

  5. Registered User

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    106

    Default

    What's the better way to remove blood, Sweat and beer?

  6. Registered User

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Sherwood Forest. ENGLAND
    Posts
    354

    Default

    AutoGlym Last Touch Detailer. Always use this to de grubby a kit Works brilliantly on all finishes & chrome. Use it on my 911 also
    Yamaha Recording Custom 10,12,13,16,22 in Cherry Red
    Pearl Masters Premium Maple "Redline" in 12, 16, 22. Black on Black.
    Premier Projector MK1. 12,13,16,22 in Piano Black
    Endorser for Scymtek Cymbals & The London Drumstick Company.

  7. Enjoy Every Sandwich

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    Mar 2012
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    Just Here...Tuning My Notepad
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    3,329

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredo View Post
    What's the better way to remove blood, Sweat and beer?
    Just burn the body.

  8. Drumming Since 1943

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    Jun 2005
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    NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheez_Whiz View Post
    Just burn the body.
    Well that escalated quickly.
    Way Too Much Crap

  9. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    6,862

    Default

    I just use warm soapy water. Dip the whole drum in the bath tub.

    Not really. Do yourself a favor and do one drum at a time. Complete. Reassemble the drum and tune it up before you move the the next. I've done it both ways where I've taken the entire kite apart and then it's a daunting task. There is SO much hardware. It will seem like a weeks task. And it is. But if you do it one drum at a time it is much more enjoyable. You can't do a whole kit in a day but you can do a drum easy.

    On to cleaning. I just use warm soapy water on the whole kit. I use the heads to hold the hardware. Wash the lugs. Then the rod. Then the swivel nuts. Then the nylon spacer in the lug. All by hand. All in the sink like a bunch of dishes. I have a big bath towel on the counter to let them air dry but have a hand towel to hand dry and smack most of the water out before placing them on the drying bath towel. Then do the hoops. I actually put a small dab of dish soap right on the hoop and some on my fingers. Your finger tips should be pretty soft and none abrasive from washing all the other parts by the time you get to the hoops. And just message the soap right in. I have a wash cloth at the bottom of the sink and spin the hoop by hand leaving the lower half submerged at all times so no soap builds up or has a chance to dry.

    Then I dry these by hand. Inspect them, look for spots to be touched up or not. Drain the water. The water is 6" / 8" deep at the most. Too, this water is almost hot and pretty, but not overly soapy.

    Then on to the shell. I basically use a soft dry cloth to gently wipe down the inside of the shell and the bearing edge.

    This time the the water is just warm and only a little soap. I use the softest cloth I have and dip it in the water. Ring that puppy out til it's almost dry. And wipe the outer shell...Gently! I never get water on the bearing edges and the cloths is wrung out so much it won't drip through the lug holes.

    The hardware should be dry by now. Tap each swivel nut against the heel of you hand to knock out any moister. There is always none. I'm always surprised by that. But if there is, hey you just knocked it out.

    Now is the time to decided if your going to wax them.

    The Session kit I did, I used Turtle Wax chrome polish. Worked like a charm.

    I didn't use it in the MCX snares and the two toms I cleaned. I've still to do the floor toms and kick. I just got lazy ( or I was having to much fun playing them )

    Repeat: I didn't use the chrome polish. I just washed them like the steps above. I wish I had though. The dust wipes right of the polished Session kit still to this day and the MCX kit already is printed up and hold on to it's dirt like it's gold.

    In this situation if you don't have chrome polish you may not be able to go get some. Plus I believe you have black hoops and hardware.

    Car wax would do but I'd rub it in sparingly with your fingers gently and remove it fairly quick.

    I may look up my pics from my Sessions post and share them here. It's 2:00 am and I can't sleep...so...

    Sorry about the chapter long reply.

  10. Playing since 1976

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    USA
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    7,279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JY Kelly View Post
    So I was looking at my drums the other day and realized a) they’re pretty smudgy and b) I’ve never actually cleaned a drum before. What is the best product to do so? Needs to be mild and work on the lacquer and the painted hardware. Any advice is appreciated.
    I "third" the suggestion for Trick Drum Polish. It is excellent. It was recommended by Al a few years back. He said they use it on ALL of their drum products when they are gearing up for trade shows. I just bought some of it a couple weeks ago.

    https://www.musiciansfriend.com/acce...ms-drum-polish
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  11. Registered User

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheez_Whiz View Post
    Just burn the body.
    Quote Originally Posted by JY Kelly View Post
    Well that escalated quickly.
    Hahahaha perfect!

  12. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    171

    Default

    Pearl actually sells a drum polish that works well on lacquer, wraps, matte finishes, chrome, satin hardware, etc. Smells nice too.

    https://www.drumcenternh.com/pearl-drum-polish

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