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  1. Registered User

    Join Date
    May 2017
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    Northern tip of Tornado Alley
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    Default Does a rack change your layout?

    I have a double bass (two drums, not pedal) 4 up, 2 floor, and 10 cymbal booms going. Needless to say it's crowded and the footprint is pretty dense with all those legs competing for positioning. Also, some booms are not where I want them but to keep the heavier cymbals from tipping... they are where they need to be, not necessarily where I want them to be. It's a Pearl kit with Opti-Loc mounts so not sure if that becomes a hard-rule for adjustability?

    So, thinking of going rack.

    Mostly my setup is where I like it... distance of the toms to me, *most* of the cymbals are an okay distance over toms, etc.

    However, I'm wondering if the nature of a rack like a Gibraltar (budget limitations) might force me into a setup that has less flexibility than noodling stands around on the carpet?

    This is my home kit... never moves or transported.

    One of my hopes is the heavier cymbals would no longer suffer from tipping if I boomed them in closer to where I want. Hoping also the toms can live where they normally do as if mounted double-pipe on the current bass drums?

    How about your experiences? More flexibility? Do you find your are forced into must-have positioning that you were better off with floor stands or bass mounts?

    Also thinking a bit of weight and from the perspective of a large-ish kit.

    Thanks gang!
    Last edited by Riggz; 02-15-2020 at 11:54 AM.

  2. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Charlotte, N.C.
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    2,363

    Default

    A rack gives far more options for positioning, though it may be more expensive to obtain that positioning by the time you factor in the extra parts.

    There's certainly nothing that stands can do that a rack can't, unless we're arguing portability and compactness. I have no complaints about switching to my ICON from stands.

  3. Registered User

    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
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    81

    Default

    A rack will allow you to put everything where you want it, but a few things to know:

    The rack will actually have a much smaller footprint than stands. The 3ish foot circle you have to account for with a traditional tripod stand goes away. My 7pc on a rack fits onto a smaller( width) riser than my 4 pc with stands.

    Cymbal arms have infinite positioning, and you will not need to use multi clamps to fly cymbals off of stand/arms.

    The rack will require a lengthy setup the first time. Probably several hours minimum. Memory locks make the subsequent set-ups quick and easy.

  4. Dalmi Joedi - Jedi

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Jersey Shore & BKLYN
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    19,018

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HPD260 View Post
    A rack gives far more options for positioning, though it may be more expensive to obtain that positioning by the time you factor in the extra parts.

    There's certainly nothing that stands can do that a rack can't, unless we're arguing portability and compactness. I have no complaints about switching to my ICON from stands.
    From my one experience of owning a rack, this is on point.

    Personally, I sold mine within a year due to the size kit I was playing there was no need. I found it awkward to move and had limitations when playing live due to the way certain venues are laid out, but for the size kit you have and you playing mostly or always at home, I cannot think of a better way to go.

  5. Registered User

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    1,753

    Default

    For a kit of that size that stays at home, I would absolutely recommend racking it.

    You'll find new options for placement so things are where you want them vs. where they can fit.
    You'll eliminate any tipping possibility.
    It's visually much more attractive than stands.
    Nothing wrong with Gibraltar racks/parts.

    It can be pricey however. Not so much the rack itself, but the clamps, memory locks and especially if you replace your boom arms... that adds up quick.

  6. Registered User

    Join Date
    May 2017
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    Northern tip of Tornado Alley
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    Default

    Thank you all for the feedback. I certainly wouldn't mind reducing the footprint and enjoying the better placement options... with no tipping. If all goes well I'll just be able to cannibalize my current boom arms into new clamps. I appreciate your help, everyone!

  7. The Hardware Guy

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    London-ish
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    Default

    The main benefits of racks is the smaller footprint (you can get them tucked right into a smaller square for the drum riser, without all the tripods) and also the speed of set up/tear down (than collapsing of all the stands). Depending how big your rack is, you can end up with a lighter bunch of hardware the nyou originally had too.

    And if you go to a round rack (ala Gibraltar) then you're almost unlimited with positioning, as you can rotate on the bar to angle the boom/tom arm wherever you need it.

    Use the memory locks correctly and nothing will slip. Despite the "it's round! Everything will slip and fall down!" people (who have either never used a round bar rack before, or were using it incorrectly)

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  8. Pearl Masters Drummer

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Cleveland, Ohio
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    Default

    I love a nice rack

  9. Registered User

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    Mar 2013
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    6,891

    Default

    I was a stands or nothing guy. Then I got a rack. The options are awesome. I hear / see a lot of talk of a smaller foot print. On the fence with that one. It still takes up as much room as a drum set so. The only way I got a noticeably smaller foot print was when I sat it up with my bop kit. Name:  image-4257619104.jpg
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  10. Registered User

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    Mar 2013
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    Default

    You can see rack withy kit in the back ground Andy bop and them my bop with rack.

    Why the picks double loaded I don't know.

  11. Registered User

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    West Canada
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    Default

    if you plan to transport the kit and play live with it the best piece of advice I can give you is to use memory locks on all the bar clamps, tom mounts and cymbal boom arms. also make some footprint marks on your carpet so you replicate the positioning each and every time. Racks are not cheap, but the flexibility in drum, cymbal and accessories placement is limitless!.
    My wife says I am no longer permitted to buy any more drums...I said okay you cant buy any more shoes...we are presently at an impasse! I see drums...she sees shoes!

  12. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Default

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    I change my configuration constantly. Keeps it fresh. Helps with versatility.

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