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  1. Too many hobbies

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    Default How to fix a dented Acrolite??

    The other week I picked up a 1967 Acrolite at an estate sale for $75 (with the original case and stand). It wasn't until I got home and really looked it over that I noticed that it looks as if it had been dropped on the strainer. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on getting these dents out. I was thinking of either using a sandbag under the drum and then working them out with a small piece of wood and a deadblow hammer OR trace the curve of the drum on a piece of wood, cut that out and use a clamp to push it back into shape. My guitarist suggested I go to one of those dent removal places, but I'm not sure how much they would charge to do it.
    You can see how the lever is up against the rim.
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    The bottom
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    Inside
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    It's not real bad, but I would love to get that lever off the rim. It doesn't have to be perfect, I'm not going to sell it, I just would like it fixed.

  2. NO KIT TOO BIG

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    UK
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    5:49 should help.
    Pearl, Natal, Ludwig, Tama, Slingerland, Premier Drums
    Zildjian, Sabian, Zyn Cymbals
    PEARL, LUDWIG, TAMA, YAMAHA, NATAL and DW Snares

    Roland, Dauz, FAT KAT and Koby Electronics, and loads of Percussion

    4 Kits and 8 Snares, and I still don't have enough!

  3. Too many hobbies

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    Quote Originally Posted by RushDrums24 View Post
    5:49 should help.
    Thanks!! I love his videos and I saw this one the other day, but I had not gotten around to watching it again. I forgot he did a dent fix on it.

  4. Playing since 1976

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    Sep 2012
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    USA
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    Default

    It wasn't really much of a fix... the drum was still dented when he was done. There must be a better way. Do you know any automobile ding/dent removal services near you? A guy who fixed dings in my car was able to pull a ding out of my fridge. He says that he's more successful pulling out dents, than pushing them out from within.
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  5. The Sensitone Guy

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Michigan
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    I'd go cheap. For a $75 drum, it's not worth putting lots of money into it. Here's what I'd do:

    1. Remove all hardware.
    2. Place dented portion on a carpeted floor and see if you can gently push out the dent with your thumbs.
    3. If thumbs don't work, try pushing with the rounded end (handle) of a screwdriver.
    4. If that doesn't work, gently tap it out with a dead blow hammer and block of wood.

    I fixed an out-of-round aluminum sensitone shell years ago simply by removing the hardware and gently pushing the shell against a carpeted floor. It popped back to perfection and has never changed. I think the metal "liked" its original shape and "remembered" where it was supposed to be. I little push from me was all it took to bring it back.

    EDIT: I do like the idea of having a professional auto body fix dents. Not bad advice. I'd definitely do it for an "expensive" snare ($150 and above). Anything below that, I'd probably do myself. Of course, it all depend upon how much they're gonna charge you. I'd guess we're talking $50 to fix, but I'm just guessing.

  6. Registered User

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    Sep 2003
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    South Louisiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drakken View Post
    I was thinking of either using a sandbag under the drum and then working them out with a small piece of wood and a deadblow hammer
    I had an Acro with the same problem, and that's basically what I did to it,
    except I only had a round plastic hammer/mallet and the top of a bar stool.
    Just go at it gently.

  7. Registered User

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    Oct 2008
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    West Canada
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    Here is another solution you could try if you have the tools and the patience and some hardwood kicking around. Cut a piece of hardwood to match the diameter of the shell. I am guessing that is a 14 inch snare...cut the wood to match the outside diameter of the shell...then remove all of the hardware on that side of the shell. rest the shell against the piece of hardwood and tap lightly with a ball peen hammer...that should remove the dent and return the shell to its original shape. good luck!
    My wife says I am no longer permitted to buy any more drums...I said okay you cant buy any more shoes...we are presently at an impasse! I see drums...she sees shoes!

  8. Now With More "Whiz"

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    I'd be curious to hear how this works out. I have a copper snare (Pearl sig "Smitty") that has a small indentation beneath one of the lugs. Apparently the previous owner was not aware of how soft these drums are and just cranked away on the rods; causing the indentation behind the lug. Drum is still very playable, but the dent annoys me.

    Rather than pounding away on it, I was thinking of cutting a piece of metal pipe to the internal depth of the shell and working it back and forth to try and pop out the dent. Or, even trying something like a billiard ball or a light weight "shotput" and rolling it along the interior. But I've been way too busy doing nothing to get around to that. My biggest concern is forcing the shell out of round to the point that it essentially becomes scrap metal.

  9. Too many hobbies

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheez_Whiz View Post
    I'd be curious to hear how this works out. I have a copper snare (Pearl sig "Smitty") that has a small indentation beneath one of the lugs. Apparently the previous owner was not aware of how soft these drums are and just cranked away on the rods; causing the indentation behind the lug. Drum is still very playable, but the dent annoys me.

    Rather than pounding away on it, I was thinking of cutting a piece of metal pipe to the internal depth of the shell and working it back and forth to try and pop out the dent. Or, even trying something like a billiard ball or a light weight "shotput" and rolling it along the interior. But I've been way too busy doing nothing to get around to that. My biggest concern is forcing the shell out of round to the point that it essentially becomes scrap metal.
    That sucks about that Smitty Sig., but at least it's behind a lug.
    Not a bad idea using a piece of pipe or ball. I would try and make sure the shell is warm; leaving it in the Summer Sun or use a heat gun, so the metal is more malleable. And I'd make sure you to it on a semisoft surface, so you don't cause unintentional damage to the shell. I'm going to use an old Inner tube as a base to work on.

  10. Too many hobbies

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    So, I took an old drumstick and cut it so I will have some tools to try and knock that dent out with. Will post progress pics when I get around to working on it.
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  11. Now With More "Whiz"

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    Just a quick update...

    Finally decided to try to tackle the dent in this copper snare. What I settled on was a hockey puck. Pics don't really do it justice, as the lighting was poor and I was pressed for time, but overall, it worked well. I won't say that it is completely gone, but it is much softer now.

    Essentially, removed the top hoop and head, removed the lug over the dent, set the drum on a blanket (folded over several times), stood hockey puck on end, tapped lightly/moderately with a hammer. It looks so much better now. Trying to deal with the Acrolite shell and the bead may be a bit more difficult, but if you happen to have a hockey puck and a hammer lurking in your domicile, it might be worth attempting.

    Good Luck!

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  12. Too many hobbies

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheez_Whiz View Post
    Just a quick update...

    Finally decided to try to tackle the dent in this copper snare. What I settled on was a hockey puck. Pics don't really do it justice, as the lighting was poor and I was pressed for time, but overall, it worked well. I won't say that it is completely gone, but it is much softer now.
    ......
    Good Luck!
    Nice Job! Looks great. To be honest, the dent didn't look all that bad to me.
    As soon as my girlfriend can lend me a hand, I'm going to try and work on that Acro.

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