Pearl Drummers Forum - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 12 of 50
  1. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    45

    Default Lessons or self taught?

    I figured out that I had a natural sense of rhythm and time at a fairly young age, I think 10 or 11, because I could listen to my iPod and play the drum patterns I was hearing by playing on my legs and tapping my feet. I come from a very musical family, so my parents caught on to my interest in drums fairly quickly and they signed me up for lessons. The guy I took lessons from was a real jerk, He knew full well I was a beginner and every time I would play something wrong he would get annoyed and say, "you're killing me." So after three lessons I quit and decided to teach myself. 14 years later I'm still playing and consider myself 100% self taught, Those three lessons did nothing for me so I don't count them. Would love to hear the stories of when you first started playing and if you took lessons or are self taught. Cheers.

  2. Skeld-the -wicked

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The Frozen Tundra
    Posts
    2,940

    Default

    Hello, DD 91. At 14 my father took me for lessons at a local music store. I lost interest quickly due to immaturity. I used to regret that I didn’t stick with instructions but today I feel differently. I did take about 6 months of lessons in my late 30’s . I would say I’m more on the natural/self taught side of drumming . There has been times when I felt like walking away out of frustration with other musicians /bands but I made a commitment to myself to continue. No matter how big or small the audience is there is always a connection with someone. There is always room for Learning.
    Pearl Masters Premium Diamond Burst 6pc
    Pearl Masters Red Mahogany Classic 5pc
    14 x 6.5 Phosphor Bronze FF Snare
    Zildjian Cymbals
    Vic Firth sticks

  3. The Hardware Guy

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    London-ish
    Posts
    14,463

    Default

    Started self taught - was gigging the first summer I got a kit. Took lessons when I returned in the autumn school year, my teacher was awesome (didn't hurt he was my bandmates dad). Continued those lessons over the next few years during school term time, whilst also teaching myself stuff I wasn't learning (double bass technique, blast beats, etc) in between and gigging throughout.

    PEARL CZX "CUSTOM Z" ALL MAPLE
    22", 22", 8", 10", 12", 13", 14", 16", 18"
    PICSPICS 2
    ďAfter silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.Ē
    Click Here To Help My Next Epic Search Quest

  4. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    CLT
    Posts
    2,286

    Default

    100% self taught. I started playing in middle school band and played through high school, but neither band director could do anything at all with a pair of sticks. While I feel I can hold my own, I do wish I would’ve sought out some formal instruction. I think I would’ve benefited from it, especially with rudiments.

  5. Thwunk

    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    421

    Default

    I was a self-taught golfer for years. I was kind of ok, but not particularly good, and I improved very slowly and didn't really know how to improve, or what to work on. I just kept playing, and I enjoyed it, but I didn't know much about technique.

    In the last few years I've had the occasional lesson. I go in, hit a few balls, and the teacher can tell me almost immediately what I can do better, because he's a trained professional with experience and a thorough understanding of technique. He tells me to change a couple of basic things, and my game improves immediately. I would never have figured that stuff out by myself.

    I teach drums. Sometimes I get self taught drummers coming in, and their technical shortcomings are almost always immediately obvious. As the lessons progress, it's also obvious that it would have been much easier to learn this stuff from the start than trying to change things after years of haphazard technique and bad habits.

    A bad teacher will do absolutely nothing for you. A good teacher will give you the skills to improve far more quickly and ultimately become a much better player.
    HHX hats, K crashes, Bosphorus rides
    Snares: Yamaha Bamboo Custom 5.5x14 / Ludwig Classic Maple 8x14, Black Beauty 5x14, COB Supraphonic 6.5x14, Acrolite 5x14 / Sonor D505
    Pearl Reference Pure (matte walnut) / Yamaha Maple Custom Absolute (plum lacquer)

  6. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    254

    Default

    I was lucky... not only did my parents encourage me to play, but I also had multiple teachers over the years who all taught me different things.
    One teacher taught me the beginning basics.
    Another steered me towards Jazz/Fusion and started taking me to open mic nights.
    Another taught me all about the nuances of Classic Rock drummers and how to actually be a gigging musician.
    Not to mention all the other people I met at various open mics who saw my desire to learn and perform and took me under their wings to nurture and teach me what means to play with other people. If it weren't for them, it would have taken me years to learn how to "listen and react".

    There are dozens of people that helped turn me into the drummer I am. They may all have more faith in me than I do, but I know I wouldn't be able to do anything at all if it weren't for them.
    Don't pick a fight with a drummer... we beat things for a living.

  7. Rockin' the Cosmos..

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sirius-2DS
    Posts
    4,163

    Default

    I played snare drum in middle school band for 3 years .. learning all those basic rudiments and reading music helped pave the way for me actually playing on drums in highs school years ... I also took music theory in high school and I've been playing guitar as long as drums

    With that said, I'll say I was pretty much self taught at both drums and guitar because although the snare rudiments laid foundation for me , I owe all my drumming experience to listening to a lot of music, figuring out what was played by ear and playing in various bands .. I admit I took 2 guitar lessons when I was young but quickly realized I was better off learning chords from a guitar book and playing by ear ... there have been a few guitarist/drummers that have given me tips and quick lessons that inspired me throughout the years .. Having someone point out your bad technique hitting cymbals was a life saver for me .. I'm glad I fixed that at a somewhat early point in my drumming as cracking cymbals constantly is expensive and just plain bad technique

  8. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Prowler View Post
    I was lucky... not only did my parents encourage me to play, but I also had multiple teachers over the years who all taught me different things.
    One teacher taught me the beginning basics.
    Another steered me towards Jazz/Fusion and started taking me to open mic nights.
    Another taught me all about the nuances of Classic Rock drummers and how to actually be a gigging musician.
    Not to mention all the other people I met at various open mics who saw my desire to learn and perform and took me under their wings to nurture and teach me what means to play with other people. If it weren't for them, it would have taken me years to learn how to "listen and react".

    There are dozens of people that helped turn me into the drummer I am. They may all have more faith in me than I do, but I know I wouldn't be able to do anything at all if it weren't for them.
    This may sound funny, but I owe a lot of my drumming ability and skill to my dad, who is the best guitar player Iíve ever heard in person but hasnít played drums a day in his life. Playing along to songs on your phone is ok practice, but playing live with other musicians is a totally different animal. Growing up in the house with my dad was the best thing that ever happened to me in terms of music because he was always down to Jam and play songs with me. Playing with a guy of his skill level forced me to step up to the plate and not only play with him, but lead the charge because the drummer is the one in the drivers seat and is the one that queues the band into the next part of the songs. Playing with my dad almost every day and also making guest appearance with all the band heís been in over the years gave me great practice and a taste of what itís like to gig and play in front of an audience.

  9. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Prowler View Post
    I was lucky... not only did my parents encourage me to play, but I also had multiple teachers over the years who all taught me different things.
    One teacher taught me the beginning basics.
    Another steered me towards Jazz/Fusion and started taking me to open mic nights.
    Another taught me all about the nuances of Classic Rock drummers and how to actually be a gigging musician.
    Not to mention all the other people I met at various open mics who saw my desire to learn and perform and took me under their wings to nurture and teach me what means to play with other people. If it weren't for them, it would have taken me years to learn how to "listen and react".

    There are dozens of people that helped turn me into the drummer I am. They may all have more faith in me than I do, but I know I wouldn't be able to do anything at all if it weren't for them.
    This may sound funny, but I owe a lot of my drumming ability and skill to my dad, who is the best guitar player Iíve ever heard in person but hasnít played drums a day in his life. Playing along to songs on your phone is ok practice, but playing live with other musicians is a totally different animal. Growing up in the house with my dad was the best thing that ever happened to me in terms of music because he was always down to Jam and play songs with me. Playing with a guy of his skill level forced me to step up to the plate and not only play with him, but lead the charge because the drummer is the one in the drivers seat and is the one that queues the band into the next part of the songs. Playing with my dad almost every day and also making guest appearance with all the bands heís been in over the years gave me great practice and a taste of what itís like to gig and play in front of an audience. It was the best practice I could ask for.

  10. th droids yerlookn4

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    massachusetts
    Posts
    5,625

    Default

    i had a teacher that taught me the very basics ...and then..... i was self taught after that ...the music teacher was more interested in band percussion and was upset that i didnt wanna, yknow, stand behind a triangle for a year ..lol
    but , learning the drums threw me in with the musicians click ..lol ..in my school musicians were like...40 percent or more of the student body , encompassing everything from choral singers to death metal guys ...it was a fun place in that respect
    but , yeah everything from rudiments to practicing , learning double bass, learning open handed style to..i dunno...gravity blasts ..was all me ..lol for me ..even in the most technical styles of metal ... i've come to find that if you dont have the feel ....it all falls flat... i feel lucky to learn my own feel and sense of rhythm ..though at times iwish i had a little more on the book side ..to possibly have better communication with other musicians

  11. Registered User

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    North AL
    Posts
    262

    Default

    100% self taught. Didn't start till like 16. Had some piano lessons when younger and played sax in school band. Wish I had some drumming fundamental technique education, more than Modern Drummer provides.
    Pearl Masters Maple Complete Vermillion Sparkle
    8X8 10X9 12X9 16X16 22X18
    PAISTE Signatures / Aquarian heads / ProMark sticks


  12. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    6,566

    Default

    4 years on a snare in grade school band.

    28 years on a drum set of self taught mayhem!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •