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  1. Vintage 1968

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    Thanks Dylan. It was great getting back to Pearl HQ after the misunderstanding wirh a Masterworks kit being mistakenly loaded in my car the last time!��

    If you wanna know why Pearl is the best, there are two of the reasons in the picture with me.

    P.S. Who dressed Derreck and AL?!!

  2. Drumming Since 1943

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    It’s on my bucket list to take an MC ride to Nashville and visit Al and the boys
    Way Too Much Crap

  3. Pearl Corporation USA

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudme View Post
    Thanks Dylan. It was great getting back to Pearl HQ after the misunderstanding wirh a Masterworks kit being mistakenly loaded in my car the last time!��

    If you wanna know why Pearl is the best, there are two of the reasons in the picture with me.

    P.S. Who dressed Derreck and AL?!!
    you had a blue shirt too!



    Pearl Corporation USA | Nashville

  4. Vintage 1968

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    Quote Originally Posted by AL PERCIVAL View Post
    you had a blue shirt too!
    It was the Blue Shirt Comedy Tour!
    Plus, Science always wears blue! It was either blue or red, and I didn't want to be a red shirt with William Shatner up in orbit!
    Last edited by dudme; 10-14-2021 at 12:52 PM.

  5. Pearl Corporation USA

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudme View Post
    It was the Blue Shirt Comedy Tour!
    Glad you made it home safe!



    Pearl Corporation USA | Nashville

  6. Vintage 1968

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    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/alic...nterview-2021/

    In the below interview, Cooper shares some road stories, including time spent with Kiss and writing classics like "No More Mr. Nice Guy."

    You're doing shows right now with Ace Frehley. How did you first meet him?
    We’d known [Kiss] back in the day. We were not surprised about Kiss. We knew them back when they were …. before Kiss. We told them where to buy their makeup. [Laughs] People were going, “What do you think about this band that wears makeup?” And I went, “Yeah, I know who they are. They wear Kabuki makeup, and it’s not like mine and they’re not like us. They’re their own thing.” When we first started the whole theatrics thing, I was hoping it was going to break the door down and say that theatrical bands could make hit records. We did that. Then Kiss came and [David] Bowie came, and everybody that wanted to be theatrical could be theatrical and still make hit records. That was one of the few things that we did before anybody else.

    You’ve recorded new versions of some of your most well-known songs for this Audible project. How did the idea of revisiting those songs come about?
    I would never have done that if Bob Ezrin wasn’t involved. Bob and I, we’re as close as it can be when it comes to writing about Alice or writing for Alice. Because we always talk about Alice in the third person. I relate to Alice more as a character than part of me. So when we did this, I always promised my fans, “You’ll never see me on MTV doing acoustic versions of our songs.” Alice Cooper is electric. We’re loud and we’re in your face, and we’re hard rock. But for a project like this, I said, “That’s kind of a cool thing to do.” To do, really, lounge versions of “I’m Eighteen” and “School’s Out.” I said, “As long as they have a hint of a sense of humor in it, I think it’s a great idea.”

    It was kind of fun to record them with all of the production. You know: How would you treat this song if it was just a guitar or a piano? And so, yeah, I would only have done that with Bob Ezrin.

    You talk about how Pink Floyd in their early days had a light show like yours. No one would expect that now.
    Oh, yeah. It was back when they ran out of money and they moved in with us! We were playing the same club. We knew who they were, but I don’t think anybody on the planet knew who they were. We went to see them and I went, “That’s exactly our light show,” which was just colored lights flickering on and off. We got along with these guys so well. Because we were both kind of psychedelic at the time. I think they were impressed that we knew all of the songs from The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. We knew all of those songs. Syd Barrett and [original Alice Cooper guitarist] Glen Buxton got along. They were both two of the weirdest guitar players ever!

    They came over and stayed, I think, for a weekend with us, because they ran out of money. I mean, they just literally ran out of money. We always just put our money in, and we could at least eat. The funniest story there was that we did get an audition at Gazzarri’s in the afternoon. Pink Floyd decided to make brownies. Now, I had never ingested marijuana before. It’s a different high. I mean, it’s like, really, you get crazy stoned. We were up onstage trying to do these songs for an audition, and I kept falling off the stage. It was only about a foot high. The Floyd were in the audience. It was just them in the afternoon, and they were laughing their heads off because we were so stoned. But we did get the job!

    What did working with Frank Zappa contribute to the development of the band's sound? The records you made with Zappa are different from where the band eventually went.
    Here was the thing about Frank: Frank did not want to produce us like a production. He listened to the songs on Pretties for You, which were very strange little songs. They were like a two-minute song with 25 changes. There were five or six of those kind of songs. He listened to them, and he goes, “I don’t get it.” I said, “Well, is that good or bad? He said, “No, it’s good. If I don’t get it, then I want to record it! But I don’t want to produce it. I want you guys to do these songs live in the studio. Because nobody’s going to believe that you do these songs live with all of these changes in them, and you don’t make mistakes.”

    And he says, “Your band, for some reason, knows how to slow down and speed up exactly the same way every time.” So we were a bit of a curiosity to Frank. He said, “I’m not going to produce this album. I want you to do all of these songs live in the studio.” That’s what we did. Pretties for You was all live in the studio.

    I also love the stories that you tell about Chuck Berry and Little Richard, particularly Chuck Berry making up words.
    Yeah, there’s only so many syllables in that measure, and you’ve got to not only syncopate them, you’ve got to make them tell a story. And on top of it, it’s got to have a punch line and it’s gotta fit the music. People go, “Well, that must be very complicated,” and I go, “It really isn’t.” You know, write the punch line first and then work backwards. So you know you’re going to hit [that mark]. You don’t have to do the song and then go, “Okay, now what’s the punch line?” You’ve already written the punch line. You know what it’s going to be. It’s “No More Mr. Nice Guy.” So how do you get to that? You have to talk about what’s frustrated you to the point of saying, “No more Mr. Nice Guy.” “I used to be such a sweet, sweet thing, until they got a hold of me.” Opened doors for little old ladies, you know, helped the blind to see. Then all of a sudden you saw your name in the paper, and people started tearing you to pieces. Okay, no more Mr. Nice Guy!

    That’s just one example, but I always like to write [like that]. I think the song should be the chorus. That should be the title of the song, usually. Because the old thing is, “Don’t bore us, get to the chorus.” But I learned a lot of that from Chuck Berry, though. He did it so many times, and he did it so well. When you think about the songs that he wrote, the picture of him riding on a city bus trying to catch Nadine. You know, [the lyrics about] the coffee-colored Cadillac, I’m just saying, “That’s just so picturesque.” That’s how I want to write. I want people to close their eyes and picture everything that’s going on in the song.

    What was your biggest takeaway getting to take the dive into your own history?
    I don’t mind letting people in on my personal life. It’s Alice that I want to keep the mystery. You know, Alice the character is the one that has no background. He has no history. He’s a character, so he really just came out of my brain and Bob Ezrin’s brain. We developed that character, and we know what he would say and what he wouldn’t say - what he would wear, what he wouldn’t wear. All of [that kind of stuff]. But as far as my personal background, I talk about all of it. I don’t hide anything. People are always surprised that I talk about my Christianity, and I go, “Why would I hide that?” You know, I don’t hide all of the other stuff. The drug addiction and all of the alcoholism, and all of that. So why would I hide the Christianity? I don’t hold anything back when it comes to my own history.

  7. Vintage 1968

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    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/sant...-album-review/

    Carlos Santana has spent the past decade or so getting back to his roots after a run of all-star collaboration albums made him a chart-topping and Grammy-winning superstar at the turn of the century. His last album, 2019's Africa Speaks, was a purely Latin rock record made with drummer wife Cindy Blackman and producer Rick Rubin; the one before that, Santana IV, featured members from the Santana band's classic '70s lineup.

    For Blessings and Miracles, the band's 26th album overall, he returns to the formula he perfected on 1999's chart-topping Supernatural and last visited on 2005's All That I Am. He's even asked back some old friends, like Matchbox Twenty's Rob Thomas, who helped propel Supernatural to historic chart success via the ubiquitous "Smooth" and fills a similar role in the 21st century update "Move."

  8. Registered Loser

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudme View Post
    Ok, so I got to meet the bad boys of Pearl today, so if you give me any grief I've got backup. ��

    It was great meeting Al, Derreck and the rest of the team today. Big thanks to AL for arranging it.
    Those are some sick sconces.

  9. Vintage 1968

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    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/quee...aid-brian-may/
    The latest episode of Queen’s The Greatest video series focuses on their triumphant 20-minute show at Live Aid in 1985.

    Freddie Mercury’s band assembled a rapid-fire collection of hits as they took their turn on the Wembley Stadium stage in London. Their set – watched by 72,000 people in the venue and 1.9 billion on TV – has become regarded as one of the best live rock performances of all time, revitalizing Queen's career.
    “We did have an unfair advantage,” guitarist Brian May says in the video, available below. “We had done football stadiums. Freddie, particularly, learned this magical way of involving everybody. In a huge football stadium, he could make everybody feel that they were in contact.”

    May admitted, however, that the band doubted whether Bob Geldof’s ambitious Live Aid plans would work out, after he asked them to take part during an awards ceremony. “Geldof was a few tables away, and he came over and said, ‘How about doing this thing?’ And he said, ‘We’re going to have this and this and this,’” May recalls. “We said, ‘Oh yeah, I’m sure,’ you know, thinking it was an almost impossible thing to get together.” By the time Geldof asked May to commit to the show, he said, “we were all very keen to do it.”

    Drummer Roger Taylor notes: “I remember looking up and seeing the whole place just going completely bonkers in unison, and thinking, ‘Oh – this is going well!’” There were ulterior motives, he adds: “No, it wasn’t a career move, but of course that’s in the back of everybody’s mind.”

    Mercury said he assumed the backstage vibe was “going to be chaotic,” in an archival interview before Live Aid. “I mean, it has to be – we’re not all wonderfully well-behaved kids, are we? But that’s going to be the nice part of it, actually; there’ll be lots of friction and we’re all going to try to outdo each other.”

  10. Vintage 1968

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    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/robe...for-metallica/
    Robert Trujillo fondly remembers touring as an opening act with Metallica, 10 years before he wound up joining the band.

    Then part of Suicidal Tendencies, Trujillo looked back with warmth at the energy of the era, but suggested he was also just another musician struggling to pay his bills.

    “It was a really exciting time to be in Los Angeles, because everybody was writing and recording their records with their producers in the various studios,” Trujillo told Apple Beats’ Zane Lowe. “There was just a lot of excitement in rock 'n' roll with lots of different bands. Everything was on. … I was playing in Suicidal Tendencies at the time, and we had made a record that I guess Lars [Ulrich] seemed to like.”
    .That led to a tour as an opening act with Metallica in 1993. “So, for me to watch Metallica every night, and also even funny things like we would get to eat their leftover dinners when they leave,” Trujillo said. “I got my first official bonus, I'll never forget that. I believe it was in Europe, and we were summoned to go meet them in their tour lounge, I guess you'd call it, and we were handed each an envelope with cash. It was about $1,000, and that was the most money I had ever made – or saw – through music. It was just so kind and amazing.”

    A decade later, Trujillo felt he might be able to deliver what Metallica needed when they invited him to audition for their vacant bassist position, because some of their music had a similar vibe to Suicidal Tendencies. Even more important, Trujillo said, was an ability to fit in with the musicians and their crew.

    “Being in a band like Metallica – it requires a lot more than just being able to play the songs,” he said. “You've got to get along with your people, and you've got to understand how to gauge the territory.”

  11. Registered User

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    Thanks dud! Nice to see some news in this thread.
    "Now just a minute. This is a press conference. The last thing I want to do is answer a lot of questions."

    United States Army General Maynard M. Mitchell
    Press briefing. Korea 1950

  12. Vintage 1968

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    Quote Originally Posted by Feenix View Post
    Those are some sick sconces.
    They were very bright sounding, too!

    Quote Originally Posted by insane65 View Post
    Thanks dud! Nice to see some news in this thread.
    You are welcome. Sorry I had fallen behind.

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