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  1. Drumming Since 1943

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    Wonder who’s bankrolling this abomination?
    Way Too Much Crap

  2. Vintage 1968

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    METALLICA: Autographed Copy Of 'Black Album' Remastered Deluxe Box Set To Raise Funds For 'All Within My Hands'
    METALLICA has given away a rare autographed copy of "The Black Album" remastered deluxe box set. This rare band-autographed copy of the black album remastered deluxe box set is raising funds for the METALLICA's All Within My Hands foundation as it works to create sustainable communities by supporting workforce education, the fight against hunger, and other critical local services.

    Fandiem is a digital fundraising platform that harnesses the power of the fan community to do good in the world. With their donation to a selected nonprofit, fans are entered to win once-in-a-lifetime experiences with their favorite artists, festivals, athletes, and creators. These are the opportunities that were previously available only to a select few but through fandiem are awarded to the everyday fan at the heart of the community.

    The Fandiem foundation is a project of the giving back fund, a national 501c3 organization that encourages and facilitates charitable giving. the giving back fund grants donation proceeds to each campaign's partner nonprofit.

    Says Fandiem: "Where were you when you first heard one of rock's greatest albums of all time? probably headbanging to songs like 'Enter Sandman' and 'Sad But True'. Now you can do it again with an extremely rare METALLICA autographed copy of the limited-edition Black Album remastered deluxe box set. the set is signed by James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Kirk Hammett, and Robert Trujillo. This epic collector's item includes previously unreleased content, behind-the-scenes photos in a hardcover book, cool merch, and more! One superfan will get a chance to keep this signed memento forever. We know. It's awesome.
    "What's just as awesome? Supporting causes that make lives better around the world. that's why each entry to win is also a donation toward METALLICA's own All Within My Hands foundation. The organization was started by members of the band and is dedicated to creating sustainable communities by supporting workforce education, the fight against hunger, and other critical services.

    "Enter here to win a piece of METALLICA history and support lives nationwide.

    This exclusive fundraiser ends on Monday, November 1, 2021.
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    Last edited by dudme; 10-26-2021 at 04:53 PM.

  3. Vintage 1968

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    JAY JAY FRENCH Says TWISTED SISTER Has Two Songs That Are 'Standard Bearers In The World Of Popular Music'
    TWISTED SISTER guitarist Jay Jay French spoke to Brazil's Wikimetal about the fact that in today's day and age when anyone and everyone floods the musical market, it becomes increasingly hard for one band, artist or songwriter to stand out in the flow to be heard and earn a living by making music.

    "First of all, the good news is anybody can make a record," he said (as transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET). "But the bad news is anybody can make a record. And so there's so much out there that how do you rise above the noise? That becomes the issue. Now, we happen to have two songs — 'We're Not Gonna Take It' and 'I Wanna Rock' — that have raised above the noise to the point where they are standard bearers in the world of popular music, in much the same way that JOURNEY's 'Don't Stop Believin'' is just a standard bearer. Whether you like them or not, that's not the point — it's a standard-bearer song. QUEEN 'We Will Rock You', 'We Are The Champions', these are standard bearers — these are massive hits that people sing in stadiums.

    "Very much the mentality of Europe and South America as it pertains to stadium-sounding anthems is one of the reasons why TWISTED SISTER is successful today," he continued. "Even though our music is played in American football stadiums and baseball stadiums, it is almost tailor made for South America and Europe, because in South America and Europe, at soccer games, everyone puts their arms around each other and they sing these songs. So this is one of the ways that our songs become standards. But also we license them for movies and commercials and soundtracks.

    "In the '60s, counter-culture groups were offended by corporations: 'We'll never give our music to Chevrolet. We'll never give our music to Ford. We're never gonna do that, because that's beneath us. We're not part of the corporate stuff.' Well, nowadays, I'm saying, what we're saying, [is] anything we can do to get our music out there is important — any avenue," French added. "It just so happens licensing music is the last bastion of real money in the music industry, because it's old-time money. The way they pay you is just the way they've been paying you for the last 30, 40, 50 years. It's not like streaming or anything else — you get real money. So the benefit of it is twofold — one is you get paid a lot; and the other side of it is you get broadcast a lot.

    "So, if you would ask a 10-year-old kid do they know TWISTED SISTER, maybe they don't. You start singing 'We're Not Gonna Take It', the kid's gonna be singing 'We're Not Gonna Take It'. So if our consolation prize is that our music is standardized around the world, and young kids know it and it shows up in commercials and TV shows, then you know what? That doesn't suck. That's a good thing. So that's what we're lucky in possessing — between 'I Wanna Rock' and 'We're Not Gonna Take It' — two international anthems that are standardized."

    "We're Not Gonna Take It" has been used in commercials for hotel chain Extended Stay America, Claritin, Walmart, Stanley Steamer and Yaz birth control.

    The song's lyrics say in part "Oh you're so condescending/Your gall is never ending/We don't want nothin'/Not a thing from you."

    "We're Not Gonna Take It" was first released as a single (with B-side song "You Can't Stop Rock 'N' Roll") on April 27, 1984. The "Stay Hungry" album was released two weeks later, on May 10, 1984. The single made No. 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, making it TWISTED SISTER's only Top 40 single, and the song was ranked No. 47 on VH1's "100 Greatest '80s Songs".

    "We're Not Gonna Take It" was written solely by singer Dee Snider. As influences for the song, he previously cited the glam rock band SLADE, the punk band SEX PISTOLS, and the Christmas carol "O Come, All Ye Faithful".

    TWISTED SISTER called it quits in 2016 after completing a farewell 40th-anniversary tour. The band's last-ever concert took place in November of that year — 20 months after the passing of TWISTED's longtime drummer A.J. Pero.

    French's new "bizoir" — part memoir and part business primer — "Twisted Business: Lessons From My Life In Rock 'N' Roll", was released last month via RosettaBooks. Name:  jayjayfrenchwiki2021_638.jpg
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  4. Vintage 1968

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    JUDAS PRIEST Shares New Trailer For '50 Heavy Metal Years' Book
    JUDAS PRIEST and Rufus Publications have published the first-ever official book documenting the band's extensive history over the last 50 years. Titled "Judas Priest - 50 Heavy Metal Years", the book has been put together by David Silver, Ross Halfin and Jayne Andrews.

    This huge, 648-page coffee table book chronicles the history of the world’s foremost heavy metal band using hundreds of previously unseen, unpublished photographs from rock's greatest photographers including Halfin, Neil Zlozower, Mark Weiss, Fin Costello, Oliver Halfin and many more. With a linking text by renowned journalist Mark Blake, the book explores the bands exciting history on stage and off in a unique photo documentary designed to excite fans and devotees of true heavy metal the world over. Current bandmembers have all contributed to the book, with written pieces detailing their love and passion for the band, making this an extraordinary artefact for their legions of followers. The book features an exclusive cover by Mark Wilkinson, who has worked with the band for many years now.

    Halfin says: "I've photographed JUDAS PRIEST from 1978 until now, and of all the bands I've worked with, they are one of the most enjoyable to me. You have to love the mighty PRIEST."

    PRIEST guitarist Glenn Tipton comments: "We spearheaded the visual image of metal, breathing new life into it, and it has been captured forever in the pages of this book."
    "Judas Priest - 50 Heavy Metal Years" can be ordered at www.rufuspublications.com.

    JUDAS PRIEST frontman Rob Halford's autobiography, "Confess", arrived in September 2020 via Hachette Books.

    Former JUDAS PRIEST guitarist K.K. Downing released his autobiography, "Heavy Duty: Days And Nights In Judas Priest", in September 2018 via Da Capo Press.

    Bassist Ian Hill is the sole remaining original member of PRIEST, which formed in 1969. Singer Rob Halford joined the group in 1973 and Tipton signed on in 1974. Rob left PRIEST in the early 1990s to form his own band, then came back to PRIEST in 2003. Founding guitarist K.K. Downing parted ways with the band in 2011, and was replaced by Richie Faulkner.

    PRIEST's current touring lineup consists of Hill, Halford, guitarists Andy Sneap and Faulkner, and drummer Scott Travis.

    Asked by VintageRock.com if writing his autobiography provided him with a sense of closure concerning his time in JUDAS PRIEST, Downing replied: "Yeah, I think so. I guess it's the same with any long-term relationship — whether it's a husband or wife, or father or son or whatever — you spend enough time together, and idiosyncrasies show up. I guess there was no particular right or wrong — some people have more tolerance than others, and it takes a bloody miracle really to stay together for 40 years. Someone has to give. And it has to be give-and-take. But inevitably, it becomes a bit of an imbalance, and I like to think that democracy is always the best policy. And there wasn't enough of it there, I don't think."

    Last year, Halford was asked by Sea Of Tranquility about the reason for Downing's relative absence from "Confess". He replied: "We did not steer of any avoidance, per se. We just talked about every aspect that we felt was important and useful to the book itself. So there was never, 'Oh, we won't talk about that person.' There was never any kind of dismissiveness for whatever reasons. So I think there's my answer." Name:  judaspriest50heavymetalbookrufus1.jpg
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  5. Vintage 1968

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    Quote Originally Posted by JY Kelly View Post
    Wonder who’s bankrolling this abomination?
    Don't know but if it comes close I will attend. I've seen WASP several times and it is one of the best shows for under $100.

  6. Drumming Since 1943

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudme View Post
    Don't know but if it comes close I will attend. I've seen WASP several times and it is one of the best shows for under $100.
    I’ll probably go too. Still… NO RANDY PIPER, NO WASP!!1 lol
    Way Too Much Crap

  7. Vintage 1968

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    Quote Originally Posted by JY Kelly View Post
    I’ll probably go too. Still… NO RANDY PIPER, NO WASP!!1 lol
    Piper? That goes back a bit. His last stint with the band was The Last Command. I always liked him, though.

  8. Drumming Since 1943

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    My fave WASP album.
    Way Too Much Crap

  9. ex-hipodilski

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    For one reason or another (mainly because of my concert photography hobby) I've seen them like 4 times (if not more) during the last 10-15 years. They NEVER changed their setlist, not even once. The only change that happened the last show was the addition of Aquiles Priester. But they have their loyal audience and the shows are always full, so I guess they're doing something right.

  10. Drumming Since 1943

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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Alexandrov View Post
    For one reason or another (mainly because of my concert photography hobby) I've seen them like 4 times (if not more) during the last 10-15 years. They NEVER changed their setlist, not even once. The only change that happened the last show was the addition of Aquiles Priester. But they have their loyal audience and the shows are always full, so I guess they're doing something right.
    For a band predicated on spectacle, they’ve ALWAYS brought it live. As much of a born-again, bloated dweeb Blackie is, you have to admire his commitment.
    Way Too Much Crap

  11. Vintage 1968

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    Quote Originally Posted by JY Kelly View Post
    My fave WASP album.
    It is good. And a solid album. I lean more towards The Crimson Idol, but the first four albums are great.

  12. Vintage 1968

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    ‘It Was One Problem After Another’: How Woodstock 50 Fell Apart

    Woodstock 50 had nearly every resource a festival could ask for: storied brand name, massive financial backing and industry goodwill. Where did it all go wrong?

    A month before Woodstock 50 was announced, the festival was already in deep trouble. In December 2018, Michael Lang, the co-founder of the original 1969 event who had become its bemused-hippie symbol in subsequent decades, was in talks with an upstate New York racetrack for a fest that would mark the anniversary of the historic, if chaotic, cultural milestone he had overseen. The new festival would take place August 16th – 18th, 2019, almost exactly 50 years after the original Woodstock.

    Lang had begun negotiations with the international media company Dentsu Aegis to finance the event, writing in a December 4th email to the company’s chief commercial officer, D.J. Martin, that he was imagining a crowd of 150,000. Dentsu thought government permits would cap attendance at 60,000. Lang, whose email signature includes a quote from counterculture author Ken Kesey (“Put your good where it counts the most”), contested that number: “Where did you get that?” he emailed back. Martin replied, “From you.”

    Martin seemed agitated and concerned. “If that is not the case, then you need to clarify the facts to the collective team,” he wrote. “We could end up in bad shape really quickly.” Those words would eventually come back to haunt everyone.

    Woodstock 50 had nearly every resource a festival could ask for: a storied brand name, financial backing from a multinational communications company, and agents eager to sign up their artists for sizable paychecks. The three-day show would not only celebrate rock’s most iconic festival; it would connect the original’s heritage to the Coachella generation via hip-hop artists and pop chart-toppers.

    Instead, Woodstock 50 turned into a slow-moving train wreck. This Rolling Stone investigation is based on three months of reporting, nearly 100 legal filings, and dozens of interviews with people connected to the festival, including artists, agents, managers, and government officials. It’s the story of how the Age of Aquarius turned into the Age of Mercury in Retrograde — and the unfulfilled promises left in its wake.

    “You can’t ‘magic’ one of these [Woodstocks] into happening, and that’s what they tried to do with this,” says David Crosby, one of the veterans of the first Woodstock who was booked for the anniversary festival. “It had nothing to do with anybody feeling good about each other. It had to do with certain people making a huge amount of money. That’s a grubby way to start in the first place. It’s not a motivation that brings out the very best in people.”

    * * *

    If the idea of peaceful rock festivals was a dream, then Lang was the dreamer for the job. Starting with his earliest business venture — a head shop he opened in Miami after dropping out of college in 1967 — the Brooklyn native seemed like two people in one: a fringe-clad, curly-topped counterculture man-child and a savvy businessman who knew there was a youth market to exploit. (One of his former Woodstock partners would call his face “by turns evil, wanton, fey, impish, and innocent.”) Lang’s first attempt at putting together a gathering, the 1968 Miami Pop Festival, was hampered by rain and financial issues, but he proved he could hustle his way through anything with sheer will and force of personality — lessons he applied to Woodstock the following year.

    Woodstock Music Festival co-founder Michael Lang in 1969. Photo credit: Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images .

    With three partners, Lang conceived the idea of a three-day festival in New York state in 1969, but the original Woodstock succeeded more on dumb luck than on precise planning. After losing the planned site in Wallkill, New York a month before gates were scheduled to open, Lang famously drove by a field in Bethel, New York, owned by dairy farmer Max Yasgur, and Woodstock was suddenly back on. In the end, between 300,000 and 400,000 music fans attended — either by paying for tickets or crashing the gates — and with the added help of a profitable movie and soundtrack album, Woodstock became one of the era’s defining moments. “He got lucky in 1969,” says Country Joe McDonald, who played Woodstock with his group the Fish. “The event made itself. He didn’t make the event.”

    Lang returned in 1994 with some of his original business partners to unite new rock bands with boomer legends for Woodstock’s 25th anniversary, which lured a respectable 300,000-plus people to Saugerties, New York and went relatively smoothly. Five years later, the disastrous Woodstock ‘99 in Rome, New York that Lang co-produced saw multiple reports of sexual assault, including an alleged gang rape, occurring alongside riots and acts of violence. But everyone, surely Lang included, knew that the culmination of Woodstock nostalgia would propel a 50th-anniversary event.

    In 2014, Lang told Rolling Stone he wanted to throw a 50th anniversary festival. Photographer Baron Wolman, who has known Lang since shooting the original festival for Rolling Stone , says he talked about anniversary plans with Lang several years ago. “He was going to purchase land in the Denver area and build a permanent venue where he would have the festival and [subsequent] festivals,” Wolman says. “I never heard another thing about it. He’s a good guy — you can’t help but love him. He’s a dreamer. That’s the problem. He doesn’t know how to activate or realize the dream.” (“We thought Colorado might be a possible location,” Lang confirmed. “The fact that pot is legal in Colorado was a big plus, and they had lots of open land.” Ultimately, Lang wanted to keep any festival he was doing in New York.)

    In 2017, Lang started planning the fest seriously, focusing on Watkins Glen International, a racing speedway in New York’s Finger Lakes region. In 1973, the track became a music venue for the first time when a concert named Summer Jam attracted an estimated 600,000 people to see the Allman Brothers, the Band, and the Grateful Dead. (The event once held the Guinness World Record for pop-festival attendance.) Phish successfully staged their three-night Magnaball festival there in 2015 — but the site also came with its own issues: The name of Phish’s planned three-day 2018 festival, Curveball, proved prescient, when heavy rainfall contaminated the water supply, forcing its last-minute cancellation.

    Lang inspected the grounds himself that winter, and when his team first contacted Dentsu around that time, everything seemed in place for an August 2019 celebration. According to court filings from a subsequent legal battle between Woodstock 50 and Dentsu, Lang and his associates told the company they had already been in talks with Watkins Glen. At the time, the organizers said they were working to procure a mass-gathering permit from the state to allow on-site camping – a law instituted in 1970 as a result of the original Woodstock – and that they would have a selection of A-list performers worthy of Woodstock’s legacy booked by New Year’s Eve.

    In November 2018, Dentsu officially joined forces with a newly formed company, Woodstock 50 LLC. From a strictly business standpoint, Woodstock 50 was operated by Greg Peck and Susan Cronin, who hired Lang as a producer to avoid a conflict of interest with his other company, Woodstock Ventures, which owns the rights to the name. Peck, whose background is in hotels, had no music industry experience prior to Woodstock 50. He had spent years working for famed hoteliers Ian Schrager and André Balazs before acquiring the Crescent Hotel in Beverly Hills. Cronin, his partner in the Crescent, knew Lang, and Lang started staying at the hotel when he was in Los Angeles.

    The three grew close, and Lang eventually approached them about Woodstock 50. “They were good friends,” says Lang. “And I mentioned it to them one day that my partners would much rather do this as a license, and would they be interested? And they said sure.” The hoteliers licensed the festival name from Woodstock Ventures in the fall of 2018 and officially signed on to Lang’s dream.

    This arrangement also meant that several of the major players in Woodstock 50, including Dentsu, had virtually no experience in putting on a major music festival. What they did have, at least in the beginning, was cash. Dentsu, the parent company of Dentsu Aegis, has a market cap of nearly $10 billion and has supported everything from the NBA players union to a Japanese ad featuring snacking noises— and investing in the Woodstock brand would have given the firm an entree into the festival universe, which, Lang tells Rolling Stone, could have included an annual Woodstock in a different city around the world.

    Woodstock 50’s contract with Dentsu Aegis said that the financier would contribute up to $49,141,000 to the festival, based on the assumption that a maximum of 150,000 tickets could be sold and an additional $22 million would come from corporate sponsorships. Lang told Dentsu he had met with a sheriff and a county executive in summer 2018 and had been given the green light to have more than 100,000 attendees. Another clause in the agreement stipulated that in March 2019, four months after the contracts were signed, both parties would “determine in good faith . . . whether such assumptions [regarding the number of attendees and prospective sponsorship money] remain accurate.”

    By December, just one month into the joint arrangement, communication problems were already setting in. But those issues were, for the moment, brushed aside. Before they could court concertgoers, they needed artists.
    “The Current Talent Strategy Is Flawed”
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