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  1. Registered User

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    Default Why do people think 4 piece kits are fun?

    I always find it quite confusing when I see someone comment on a basic four piece kit, by saying "that looks like a lot of fun". These four piece kits are usually all the same basic setup. I don't want to start a fight with this thread. Just because I don't get it, doesn't mean that four piece kits can't be fun for others. When ever I get on one of my four piece kits, I can't wait to get back on a bigger kit with more toms.

    What makes people like four piece kits so much?

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    It's that minimalistic mindset that is kind of sweeping drumming for the last few years. It's a fad alot like huge drum sets were back in the days. I for one love larger kits but I understand alot of music doesn't need a huge kit to play and that's where alot of people enjoy that just what you need mindset. Unpopular opinion, a 4 piece kit makes an average drummer look good. If you put an average guy behind a large kit alot of the time he will look like a chump. Also alot of drummers see large kits as arrogant and for whatever reason I don't understand that. In the age of digitally made drumming and hipster 4 piece and 3 piece kits it makes alot of sense for the smaller kits. Don't forget that also alot of people can't shell out 10 grand for a drum set with two bass drums a rack and every feature you can have. Also don't forget just playing drums is fun
    Last edited by Brutaldudeski; 10-22-2016 at 11:13 AM.

  3. Unban nik12

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    I like playing my kit as a 4 piece because it's less to haul. I only have 2 toms, kick, snare, hats, and 2 cymbals. Sometimes I bring an extra cymbal and floor tom but usually I just stick to the essentials
    Tama Starclassic Bubinga/Birch

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  4. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchLyons View Post
    I like playing my kit as a 4 piece because it's less to haul. I only have 2 toms, kick, snare, hats, and 2 cymbals. Sometimes I bring an extra cymbal and floor tom but usually I just stick to the essentials
    I get the whole easier to move around thing. I just don't get the fun to play thing as a personal choice.

  5. Unban nik12

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    Quote Originally Posted by sticks4drums View Post
    I get the whole easier to move around thing. I just don't get the fun to play thing as a personal choice.
    I enjoy it, there's absolutely no need to have that much stuff. It's fun to goof around on big kits but my way of thinking is that I can essentially do anything I could want on a 4 piece, anything above that is just extra
    Tama Starclassic Bubinga/Birch

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  6. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchLyons View Post
    I enjoy it, there's absolutely no need to have that much stuff. It's fun to goof around on big kits but my way of thinking is that I can essentially do anything I could want on a 4 piece, anything above that is just extra
    When I gigged I used a 6 piece, which seemed minimal for a lot of the fills I liked to incorporate in my playing. If I had of used 4 pieces I would of felt limited. I could still play the music, but would feel limited in playing how I normally play. Maybe it is just what you get used to. To me, two toms will never sound like 4 toms, and 4 toms will never sound like 6 toms, etc, etc. I know it also depends on the music you are trying to reproduce.

  7. Registered User

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    i personally think 4 piece kits are extemely limiting even in a basic sense. a 5 piece is minimum (and enough) for me. (1 up 2 down)

    moving a kit is a different story tho. the less i have to take apart and setup the better.
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  8. Drumming Since 1943

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    As you know, I am a fan of large kits- hell, I'm a child of the '80's) and own one.

    But now that I'm gigging as often as I am, dragging out a 9-piece literally makes no sense. For one, it wouldn't fit in my X3 and secondly, the band I'm in now doesn't at all require it. The more I gig (and act as my own tech) the less I want to haul. This, admittedly is a function of age and experience. When I first started gigging in the '90's, I would bring my entire Beauford-esque kit to gigs- without even checking if it'd fit. And that caught me out a few times. But I didn't care. I wanted everyone to see/hear all my gear. Hell, I had an Isanbul flat ride (mounted to my left of course) that no one could hear. No matter, that cymbal came with me to every gig.

    Now? My China is a luxury item. I brought my x-hats out to our last gig and used them ONCE- to count a song in. Hauling two kicks to a gig for no reason is just silly and makes no sense.
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  9. Registered User

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    Now I get all the I don't want to haul a big kit, and I can get by with a four piece, but l don't want to lose site of my original thought of this thread.

    Why would someone look at a four piece kit and say "that looks like fun".

    Aside from the ease of moving a four piece around, what makes a four piece kit fun?

    If I walk into a room and they have 4 Tama Bubinga kits set up. All the same heads, colour, etc, but have a four piece, a five piece, a six piece, and a seven piece, I am going straight to the seven piece every time. To me, more stuff = more fun. That is just my way of thinking.

  10. "One, please."

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    Because I can say everything I need to with two toms and not leave the listener wanting, and having having five toms doesn't make me groove better.
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  11. "One, please."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brutaldudeski View Post
    It's that minimalistic mindset that is kind of sweeping drumming for the last few years. It's a fad alot like huge drum sets were back in the days. I for one love larger kits but I understand alot of music doesn't need a huge kit to play and that's where alot of people enjoy that just what you need mindset. Unpopular opinion, a 4 piece kit makes an average drummer look good. If you put an average guy behind a large kit alot of the time he will look like a chump. Also alot of drummers see large kits as arrogant and for whatever reason I don't understand that. In the age of digitally made drumming and hipster 4 piece and 3 piece kits it makes alot of sense for the smaller kits. Don't forget that also alot of people can't shell out 10 grand for a drum set with two bass drums a rack and every feature you can have. Also don't forget just playing drums is fun
    I think this is very narrow minded. John Bonham wouldn't have benefited from having four rack toms, and Ringo didn't need two bass drums. Different styles of music call for different set ups, and not everyone benefits from the same set up.
    "Hello. Hi, um, I'm a recovering crackhead. This is my retarded sister that I take care of.



    I'd like some welfare, please."

  12. Drumming Since 1943

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheElectricCompany View Post
    Because I can say everything I need to with two toms and not leave the listener wanting, and having having five toms doesn't make me groove better.
    Also, the drunks I play to will NEVER hear or care if my tom fill is done on 1 or 5 toms.

    Glen, I think your attitude is based on the fact that you don't gig. And I'm NOT saying that as a critique; just as an observation. I happen to agree that large kits with more stuff are more "fun" but when you're loading out at 2am, the 4 piece is SO the way to go. Before I started gigging back in the day, I was a huge kit basement guy- again, not a slam- all that practice on my 8-piece made me the drummer I am today, but once I got a little older and started moving all that gear around on a consistent basis, the notion of hauling gear that wasn't necessary for the gig lost its luster QUICK.
    Pearl Masters Studio BRX Millennium Mist Artist
    10x8, 12x9, 14x11, 16x13. 16x16, 18x22, 18x22, Eric Singer Sig Snare, MMX 14x5 Snare, 6x12 & 6x15 Rocket Toms
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