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  1. Registered User

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    Jazz is one of the most distinctive, intricate and broad styles of drumming. It requires specific techniques as well as sounds defined by small, high-pitched drums, and dark, washy cymbals; something contradictory to what is required for the majority of other genres.

    My current set-up is fairly versatile, but I find that it can't quite cover the ground that I need it to from jazz to metal. Does anyone here have a separate kit for jazz (assuming you play other styles as well)? And should I consider having one myself if I am serious about the genre?

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    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

  2. Rogue Ex-Mod

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    I have a 1960s Ludwig kit that I use for jazz. It's a little 4pc and I tune the drums up pretty high. I find using the smaller, higher pitched drums and playing on a 4pc actually gives me different ideas. I would feel weird playing in a jazz trio with my Pearl monster. I generally do the 4pc with an 18" crash, 20" ride and hi-hats and that's it.

    If you're serious about jazz you should probably have a kit that works well for jazz. It could be your primary kit or it could be a second kit. If you want to be able to play super loud metal I would probably suggest owning multiple kits so you can have a 22" or 24" bass drum with the one and an 18" or 20" bass for your jazz set.
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  3. Dalmi Joedi - Jedi

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    I have lots of drums and cymbals, but I don't have a particular set-up for any particular genre. I simply choose what I feel is best at the time.

  4. Deputy Grand Poobah

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    Sometimes you don't have the budget to have two different kits. When I only had one kit, I picked heads that were general purpose for most of the work I was doing, usually it was Ambassador top and bottom (I liked that clear tom sound like Simon Phillips talks about in a video) tuned higher for jazz and lower for rock. For a little bit I even had two sets of heads and changed them for each style as needed. That's a little more work especially if you have a jazz gig and a rock gig on the same day.
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  5. Living Legend

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    I feel like you can play anything on anything. It doesn't really matter. I think that subscribing to the idea that playing jazz, or any other style of music, requires the drummer to utilise specific sounding drums or cymbals is very limiting. I'd guess that there are probably just as many pro jazz drummers that play a set up that fits the traditional brief as there are that don't. It's probably got more to do with ability and the players touch rather than the gear used. At the end of the day go with the sounds that you like and do what you feel comfortable doing.
    Last edited by Gags; 07-21-2015 at 08:25 AM.

  6. Meus nomen est Nate.

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    Charlie Antolini is one of my favorite jazz drummers. He plays a big ol' rock kit.
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  7. Less is more

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    ive seen jazz played on all kinds of kits......depends on what type of jazz.....sounds like youre talking more of a trad bebop thing, re small kit.....as opposed to more of a fusion thing....

    mostly its about tuning up your toms for a better rebound and jazzy type sound.....

    you might consider using your 16 floor as a small kick for a bebop kit.....

  8. Registered User

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    My first high end kit was my Tama Starclassic B/B, which I still love and can play most things on it. But similar to you I realised that playing jazz on a 22x20 bass drum and punchy toms wasn't quite right. I know the argument that you should be able to play and style on any kit and I agree to an extent, but I bought my little Gretsch Renown bop kit originally to play jazz on and also to have a smaller kit that's easy to transport. Also, it means I can keep my Tama tuned low and thumpy, while leaving my Gretsch at the higher and more articulate tunings.

    Oddly enough, I totally prefer the little Gretsch and play it whenever possible, it's the kit that stays set up at home (with different cymbals depending what I'm playing) and I only switch to the bigger kit for a bit of fun sometimes or if I fancy working through some Gavin Harrison books.

    If you want a change and have the money I'd totally recommend a little 4 piece kit with an 18"-20" bass drum. Try one first to make sure you like it though! You'll love how easy it is to throw in the back of a car too!

  9. Registered User

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    I have different set ups for different bands, more fun and more mental exercise, if you've got money and space.

  10. What's in YOUR stickbag?

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    Traditional jazz works best with higher pitched and open sounding drums, but, unless you are working for someone that requires that particular sound, it is true that you can play any song with any decently tuned kit. BUT, it sounds like you already don't like the sound your contemporary-tuned kit sounds playing jazz...so yea, if you have the funds and the space, by all means get yourself a jazz kit...right tool for the right job, and all.

  11. Registered User

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    Thanks for the replies.
    I might set my current kit up as a 4-piece and see how that goes for now. I've got the 20" kick and jazzy cymbals so once I tune the drums up it should work out nicely.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

  12. I'm not Lebowski; I'm the dude

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    I disagree with the "one size fits all" way of thinking.

    There is a difference between THE PHRASES YOU PLAY and HOW YOU SOUND.

    There is a reason there are difference kinds of basses, guitars, amps, pianos, etc. Same with drums, heads and cymbals.

    Todd Sucherman also touches on this topic in one of his videos - use the right tool for the job.

    IMO, not only will your instrument "blend in", or sound authentic with the style of music you are playing, you will also be inspired to play "better" in that style.
    Last edited by veggyboy; 07-22-2015 at 07:43 AM.
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