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  1. Registered User

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    Nice headphones are great for checking your mix for tiny details that you may have missed on monitors. But they are very misleading in terms of balance and stereo imaging simply because of how the drivers are positioned - on opposing sides of your head. And from experience I know that mixes done on monitors translate much better onto headphones (and car speakers, etc...) much better than the opposite.

    As for your guide - I feel like a lot of classic headphones are missing from your lists of recommendations. The AKG K240S's are a great all-round headphone for around $100. I use mine to check my mixes, for tracking anything other than drums and listening to music for pleasure. They're pretty honest and unhyped. The Sennheiser HD280PRO's are great for tracking drums, also a great value for around $100.

    Are the Beyer DT250's really that much in Oz? They're around $170 in the US. For a tiny bit more, you can get the much better DT770Pro's, which are a very classic closed-back headphone suitable for music enjoyment as much as tracking in the studio.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
    Nice headphones are great for checking your mix for tiny details that you may have missed on monitors. But they are very misleading in terms of balance and stereo imaging simply because of how the drivers are positioned - on opposing sides of your head. And from experience I know that mixes done on monitors translate much better onto headphones (and car speakers, etc...) much better than the opposite.
    Sure, but this is a thread about headphones for drumming.

    Quote Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
    As for your guide - I feel like a lot of classic headphones are missing from your lists of recommendations. The AKG K240S's are a great all-round headphone for around $100. I use mine to check my mixes, for tracking anything other than drums and listening to music for pleasure. They're pretty honest and unhyped. The Sennheiser HD280PRO's are great for tracking drums, also a great value for around $100.
    Again, that guide was for drumming, mentioning whether a headphone would be good for mixing. And if I included every headphone suitable for mixing, the list would be huge and very confusing for those looking to buy headphones for drumming.

    Also, there are much better options for drumming than the HD280PROs in terms of sound quality and isolation. I only included most full size models if you cannot use in-ears.


    Quote Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
    Are the Beyer DT250's really that much in Oz? They're around $170 in the US. For a tiny bit more, you can get the much better DT770Pro's, which are a very classic closed-back headphone suitable for music enjoyment as much as tracking in the studio.
    They sure are.
    I definitely wouldn't call the DT770 Pros better than the DT250s. Especially for recording due to the very heavily boosted bass of the Beyers.
    Plus, at 250 ohms the DT770 Pros are out of the reach of the average consumer because they require a good headphone setup with a dedicated headphone amplifier to perform at their potential. I definitely wouldn't recommend running them from a portable player or on-board sound. For the price of that, you could be looking at custom in-ears.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_19 View Post
    Also, there are much better options for drumming than the HD280PROs in terms of sound quality and isolation. I only included most full size models if you cannot use in-ears.
    For $100? Not really. For more money, certainly.

    Quote Originally Posted by matt_19 View Post
    I definitely wouldn't call the DT770 Pros better than the DT250s. Especially for recording due to the very heavily boosted bass of the Beyers.
    Plus, at 250 ohms the DT770 Pros are out of the reach of the average consumer because they require a good headphone setup with a dedicated headphone amplifier to perform at their potential. I definitely wouldn't recommend running them from a portable player or on-board sound. For the price of that, you could be looking at custom in-ears.
    The 770's are available in 80 Ohms. And they're also available as an M version, which has improved sound isolation. In fact, Pearl Drum Corp. has a drum headphone monitor for sale which is a relabeled (and more pricey) version of this can. I've done lots of tracking with 770's, and clients love their bass extension. When I'm using other types of headphones, I get a lot of "more bass/kick drum in my cans please" requests.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
    The 770's are available in 80 Ohms. And they're also available as an M version, which has improved sound isolation. In fact, Pearl Drum Corp. has a drum headphone monitor for sale which is a relabeled (and more pricey) version of this can. I've done lots of tracking with 770's, and clients love their bass extension. When I'm using other types of headphones, I get a lot of "more bass/kick drum in my cans please" requests.
    I imagine that many consumers end up with the 250ohms because they don't know the difference. Also, the Pearl ones are 250ohms.
    I don't know if it would be good to recommend a headphone with such an artificial sound. You want to know what your drums actually sound like, so it would be smarter to use a balanced sounding headphone.

    Another argument for the headphones vs monitors for mixing is that some headphones can stay ruler flat down to at least 20hz.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

  5. Is this Illidan?

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    Another argument for the headphones vs monitors for mixing is that some headphones can stay ruler flat down to at least 20hz.
    But you can't hear anything that low through the headphones, the sound source is far too close to your ear. At least you get some distance with the monitors for the sound wave to build, not taking into consideration the advantage gained via the port in the speaker cabinet. This is all in addition to the fact that monitor calibration has never been easier due to huge advancements in software/digital audio workstations.

    Hell, JBL even made monitors with SELF calibration. Set up the mic, run the white noise for a few minutes, done. The monitors will adjust their EQ independently/automatically.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord The Drummer View Post
    But you can't hear anything that low through the headphones, the sound source is far too close to your ear.
    I can easily hear under 50hz with my headphones.
    Who cares, anyway? This thread isn't about monitors, and is barely about recording.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

  7. Is this Illidan?

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    I can easily hear under 50hz with my headphones.
    I'm not going to debate what you can and can't hear, all I will say is that the only way I can get a sub 50Hz wave to stand out while mixing on headphones (K77's are the worst culprit) is to actually lift the cans off my ears about 1" or so. This usually results in a mix either seriously over-bass-y, or seriously under-bass-y.

    Who cares, anyway? This thread isn't about monitors, and is barely about recording.
    Well, it became about it when someone asked about mixing headphones.

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    I hate to bump this thread this much, but my EX-29's that I've been using died on me after 5 years. I need the a pair of headphones for me to use to drum and listen to music with that have good noise attenuation and aren't too expensive. I've been thinking about the Sennheiser HD-280 Pros, would this be a good choice, since I can't really spend more than $100 at the moment.
    Check out my studio project - Elephant In the Room

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    Quote Originally Posted by paistepower92 View Post
    I hate to bump this thread this much, but my EX-29's that I've been using died on me after 5 years. I need the a pair of headphones for me to use to drum and listen to music with that have good noise attenuation and aren't too expensive. I've been thinking about the Sennheiser HD-280 Pros, would this be a good choice, since I can't really spend more than $100 at the moment.
    Don't worry - I'm glad you bumped it.

    Anyway, do you need full size? Because there are some better options isolation-wise if you go in-ear, which is what I recommend.

    Anyway, the 280s are good if you can't go in-ear, but if you can, the Etymotic HF5 and Shure SE215 are great options.

    I believe that the Shures are a little bassier, but Etys have the edge on overall sound quality.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

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    I really don't like in ear's and just like the full size better, their more comfortable for me.
    Check out my studio project - Elephant In the Room

    Also selling an 18" Meinl Soundcaster Fusion china PM for more info

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    Ok, then the 280s are fine, but you'd be a lot better off with the SE215 or Ety HF5.

    Just consider trying in-ears again.
    Dave is in less control of the metaphor than Hemingway.

  12. Kawaii User

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    Maybe it's just me...but my HD-280's barely isolate behind the drums.

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