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  1. hmm...

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    Yeah, great post
    Really good ideas for doing things while doing the rudiments. (talking, counting, 13x table, humming a tune while playing at a different tempo)
    Like most people have said: rep
    "Freedom is not free. But is it worth the price it's asking?"



  2. Registered User

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    Nov 2009
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    This is such a great post, helped me get out of a bit of a playing rut. thanks!

  3. ginga please?

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    a+ thread! ive recently discovered how useful and interesting rudiments can be used on drum set.

  4. SPARTAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!

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    Dave, great advice. thanks a lot. what are some other rudiments that you would recommend practicing?
    Whatever you are, be a good one
    TAMA SUPERSTAR EFX HYPERDRIVE
    Toms: 10x6.5 12x7 14x12 16x14
    Snare: 13x6
    Bass: 18x22
    Cymbals: Aquarian 12" Splash; Zildjian- 14" Crash, 16" Crash, 18" Crash, 22" Ride

  5. Pearl Masters

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    Oct 2007
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    In Gary Chester's introduction to concepts (New Breed), he writes an entire page about singing

  6. ohwow

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    Awesome! Thank you for sharing this, I'm going to put this to good use.

  7. Registered User

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    Dec 2009
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    Thanks for this, very educational and really useful. I love reading threads about good ways to pratice/learn drums.

    Iv got 4 question (I was gonna write a new post for this but then saw yours lol):

    How slow do you have to go to practice something new? Is it just slow enough that you have complete control, and can perform the groove/fill/whatever with ease and without any tension? Or is there a good reason to go slower than this?

    2) Also, how do you know when it's time to increase the speed? Is it when you can to the exercise still easily while doing complex algebra in your head or whatever?

    3)Also, does this idea or making your mind wander while practice make you learn things faster by forcing your brain to wire this exercise to the back of the brain rather than the front?

    4) I have been told that when learning someething new you should focus on everything you are doing: posture, if your using the right technique, and most importantly if you beat are perfectly in time with the metronome. Doesn't making your mind wander mean that you could start using bad technique or, most likely, slip out of time with the metronome because your not concentrating?

    Again, awesome post
    Thanks man
    Jonny

  8. Registered User

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    Jan 2013
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    Hey guys this is something for when you are on YouTube and you watch someone do something really cool and you can't find any tutorials or lessons on it


    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/spee...408858470?mt=8

    Taking everything in slow motion and was a very helpful and I hope it helps someone else

  9. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by [MAD] Dave Mason View Post
    .... There are two types of movement, instinctive and learned. Drumming is learned movement. .....
    Great post, Dave. Some very useful suggestions on how to improve in there. But I will disagree on one tiny technicality: I don't think of it as "instinctive" vs "learned" movements. Because some instinctive movements are natural reflex (i.e. you were born with them) such as when you touch a hot oven top. And some instinctive movements can be learned. Similarly many movements are not learned - the first time you do it is the first time you do it and you were able to do it without learning it first.

    Why am I making such a post about such a trivial technicality? Well because understanding this difference can be quite important in deciding how to learn a new movement. For example in self defence there are 2 schools of thought: Traditional Karate is made of movements which are the opposite of natural/instinct, but after thousands of repetition they become instinctive - i.e. the muscle memory is drilled in. Compared to Krav Maga which is made up of movements which are completely natural/instinctive. The result is advantages and disadvantages in either: Krav Maga gets practitioners effective very quickly - say in 3 months, much more effective than someone who studies Karate for 3 months. But someone who studies Karate for 3 years is much more effective in self defence compared to someone who studies Krav Maga for 3 years.

    So it is an important difference to understand, because there is a lesson that applies to drumming and learning new rudiments: If you want to get up to speed on any new movement quickly, make it as close as possible to a movement that is already part of your muscle memory, but to truly develop speed/agility in the movement will take lots of repetition; up to 3 years before you really internalise it.

  10. Vulgaris Magistralis

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovetheblues View Post
    Great post, Dave. Some very useful suggestions on how to improve in there. But I will disagree on one tiny technicality: I don't think of it as "instinctive" vs "learned" movements. Because some instinctive movements are natural reflex (i.e. you were born with them) such as when you touch a hot oven top. And some instinctive movements can be learned. Similarly many movements are not learned - the first time you do it is the first time you do it and you were able to do it without learning it first.

    Why am I making such a post about such a trivial technicality? Well because understanding this difference can be quite important in deciding how to learn a new movement. For example in self defence there are 2 schools of thought: Traditional Karate is made of movements which are the opposite of natural/instinct, but after thousands of repetition they become instinctive - i.e. the muscle memory is drilled in. Compared to Krav Maga which is made up of movements which are completely natural/instinctive. The result is advantages and disadvantages in either: Krav Maga gets practitioners effective very quickly - say in 3 months, much more effective than someone who studies Karate for 3 months. But someone who studies Karate for 3 years is much more effective in self defence compared to someone who studies Krav Maga for 3 years.

    So it is an important difference to understand, because there is a lesson that applies to drumming and learning new rudiments: If you want to get up to speed on any new movement quickly, make it as close as possible to a movement that is already part of your muscle memory, but to truly develop speed/agility in the movement will take lots of repetition; up to 3 years before you really internalise it.

    Would somebody please sticky this? THIS is what practicing is all about!
    Proud owned of a Blue Pearl MLX:
    10",12",13",14",16" Toms
    22" Bassdrum
    and a marvelous 14x6.5 Pearl free-floating brass snare

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