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  1. Registered User

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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by carl62
    I absolutely swear by this tuning! This is the most melodic my toms have ever sounded, and trust me when I tell you that I've tried and recorded with MANY types of tuning. This is the tuning that my students hear my toms at and they all love it and want the same. This is now officially my "standard" tuning for 10", 12", and 14". If you have a 12", 13" and 16", tune them the same as the 12", 14" and 16". Again, all 4ths with the 16" starting at a C# (or if your lowest is the 14", then an F#). Happy tuning.

    what if you have 10x8,12x9, 16x14?

  2. Export User

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    Jul 2005
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    I think I got tonal drum tuning down on toms, I can get them pretty much anywhere I want.
    Except for the snare drum. I've tried tuning them Res: A / Bat: E. But it takes so much more effort than toms.

    Any tips on this? And other tonal suggestions?
    Last edited by KaaGeej; 12-30-2007 at 07:56 AM.
    .: My Latest Drum Setup :.
    .: Pearl Export Fusion 2005 :.


    Evans EC 1 ::: Pearl Export ::: Pro Mark TX747N ::: Sabian AA & AAX ::: Tama Iron Cobra


  3. CHANDRAFIZANTA

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    Hi KaaGeej...
    THAT'S IMPRESSIVE. Rep for you.

    Cheers.

  4. CHANDRAFIZANTA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grolubao
    I would advice you to get the DVD from Bob Gatzen as it explains well what sound you will get with what scales on the toms.
    I have Bob Gatzen DVD, but I would say that he is Not a good 'lecturer' so, much of the information are Missing, and the 'lecture'/ lessons are Very Unorganized.

    I prefer to watch and listen to the performances of BILL Asbough, Bob himself and the young Kids in that DVD.

    cheers.

  5. Banned

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    May 2006
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    How do i know what to tune my drums to?

    i want my floor tom to be a octave lower then my rack tom.

    and how do i kno when i hit that spot.

  6. CHANDRAFIZANTA

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    Quote Originally Posted by VisionVLX
    Don't sacrifice a chocked drum sound for ideal intervals. At the end of the day, it's just about what sounds good, not what looks good on paper.
    INDEED !

  7. Bitter Clinger

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    veggyboy has it right: tuning to pitches helps you put the intervals you want between the drums and to replicate the tuning you like anytime, anywhere--all you need is a pitch-pipe.

    For those who say they just want to tune until it "sounds right": terrific! Do so, then find out what pitches you have and write them down, much as you would write down drum dial settings. You'll save loads of time later.

    I would only add this to what's been said. Each drum has a resonant range, and the thing to do is find out what that is for each drum in the set. Tune up from finger-tight (both heads the same for this exercise) until you get a real tone, not a flappy or papery sound. That's as low as that drum will go.

    Keep increasing the tension in small increments--say 1/4 turn or so--keeping both heads the same and keeping the lug-to-lug tuning good. Listen at every stop. Eventually you'll reach a point where the drum becomes choked--that's higher than you want to go.

    In between will be a range of notes where the drum really sings. Ideally you'd like to keep each drum in its most resonant range--don't force a drum to play a given note just because it fits your tuning scheme.

    The trick is to keep each drum in its ideal range while keeping the intervals between them useful. Experiment a bit and you'll find a combination that works.

    Write everything down and the next time you change heads you'll be able to duplicate the tuning easily.

    Thanks to the OP for this thread. I've been tuning to pitches for years and find it quite handy. Strangely enough I tried to explain this on another board and was treated to a bunch of posts telling me that I couldn't be hearing pitches out of my drums because they read on the internet somewhere that drums are of "indeterminate pitch."

  8. Export User

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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by VisionVLX
    And also, don't get too caught up in trying to force drums into certain pitch ranges. The diameter of the drum will dictate alot of the pitch, so tuning toms should be pretty much the same across the board. Don't sacrifice a chocked drum sound for ideal intervals. At the end of the day, it's just about what sounds good, not what looks good on paper.
    It's not like I started tuning thinking, I NEED this in a D I used the method of the most volume/resonance.

    Just slap the batter on and tune tune until it has the most volume and the most resonance. You'll find that most drums, even though different brands or woods, there's a small note spacing in which they will really resonate.

    For a 10" that would probably be around a C to an E. Above or below that it will probably get more choked. This is not bulletproof of course.

    Today I went to tackle the tuning "problem" again and came up with a new technique which helps me out at least.

    ## New Technique ####

    I had problems getting my chromatic tuner (Boss TU-80) to hear solid tones coming from the drum. This will probably be because it's not a string so it won't produce a linear sound wave. Differences per lug will not help with this either.

    So what I did, for all my toms and probably in the future as well, is to let my tuner play the note. I can hear, hitting the center (! for the fundamental note, not the overtones near the rims) with a stick or my finger, if it's too high or too low. Tune it up until all is even and near the correct pitch.

    Then comes the fine-tuning, the hardest part because the tuner seems to just sporadically pickup notes. What I do is hit the center and hum the sustain, not the attack. Humming almost always does produce a linear tone which the tuner can pick up. You know when your humming the right fundamental pitch when the drum sings back to you.

    It's a weird experience, it'll probably look weird too, humming to your drum but when your near the fundamental note of the drum it will sing back to you and resonate. This being able to be interpreted by my tuner, fine-tuning can commence

    #######

    All in all another big post by me, sorry 00**
    For reference, my tuning now is:

    Size / Resonant / Batter

    10" / E / D
    12" / B / A
    14" / F# / D#

    SN14" / G# / B
    .: My Latest Drum Setup :.
    .: Pearl Export Fusion 2005 :.


    Evans EC 1 ::: Pearl Export ::: Pro Mark TX747N ::: Sabian AA & AAX ::: Tama Iron Cobra


  9. Export User

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by EwGrossChris
    How do i know what to tune my drums to?

    i want my floor tom to be a octave lower then my rack tom.

    and how do i kno when i hit that spot.
    In my opening post I posted a list which most drum-sizes normally tune to. This is by no means bulletproof and you have to mess around for the sound you want.

    You'll know that your an octave lower when you hear the drum it self being lower in pitch, relative to one which in an octave higher would have a lower tone... If that made sense, hard to explain sound in words

    Lists posted so far for toms:

    8" = E, 10" = B, 12" = F#, 14" = C#
    Very early Weckl sounding toms, by Veggy.

    10" = E, 12" = C#, 13" = A#, 14" = G, 16" = E
    Another great rock tuning. Very wide-open and explosive, by Veggy.

    10" = D#, 12" = A#, 14" = F, 16" = C
    From the Drum Tuning Bible.

    10" = D-D#, 12" = B-C, 13" = A-A#, 14" = F#-G, 16" = D-E
    From M1234.

    10" = E, 12" = B, 14" = F#
    Currently used by myself.
    .: My Latest Drum Setup :.
    .: Pearl Export Fusion 2005 :.


    Evans EC 1 ::: Pearl Export ::: Pro Mark TX747N ::: Sabian AA & AAX ::: Tama Iron Cobra


  10. Registered User

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,752

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pandrex
    what if you have 10x8,12x9, 16x14?
    Thinking about this combination which is becoming fairly common, I actually got out a spair 12" tom that I had and I tried a couple of different tuning configurations. Thinking that I wanted to keep them fairly spaced apart, I kept the 10" at an 'E' and the 16" at a 'C#', but I put the 12" at an 'A'. Honestly didn't sound bad, although it did form an inverted triad and that's something I try to avoid sound-wise because you end up getting stuck in a tonality when you start getting into 3rds. So then I put my other 12" tom back up that was tuned to the already 'B' and, at least to my ears anyway, the 16"-C#, 12"-B, 10"-E, sounded killer together! Even without the 14", that would be the tuning I would defintely go with. But again, this is just my opinion and observations. Who knows, you may like the 'C#', 'A', 'E', tuning better than the other one. It's all in each persons ears. Try both and see which one you like. Have fun.
    Last edited by carl62; 01-01-2008 at 03:15 AM.

  11. Registered User

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    121

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaaGeej
    It's not like I started tuning thinking, I NEED this in a D I used the method of the most volume/resonance.

    Just slap the batter on and tune tune until it has the most volume and the most resonance. You'll find that most drums, even though different brands or woods, there's a small note spacing in which they will really resonate.

    For a 10" that would probably be around a C to an E. Above or below that it will probably get more choked. This is not bulletproof of course.

    Today I went to tackle the tuning "problem" again and came up with a new technique which helps me out at least.

    ## New Technique ####

    I had problems getting my chromatic tuner (Boss TU-80) to hear solid tones coming from the drum. This will probably be because it's not a string so it won't produce a linear sound wave. Differences per lug will not help with this either.

    So what I did, for all my toms and probably in the future as well, is to let my tuner play the note. I can hear, hitting the center (! for the fundamental note, not the overtones near the rims) with a stick or my finger, if it's too high or too low. Tune it up until all is even and near the correct pitch.

    Then comes the fine-tuning, the hardest part because the tuner seems to just sporadically pickup notes. What I do is hit the center and hum the sustain, not the attack. Humming almost always does produce a linear tone which the tuner can pick up. You know when your humming the right fundamental pitch when the drum sings back to you.

    It's a weird experience, it'll probably look weird too, humming to your drum but when your near the fundamental note of the drum it will sing back to you and resonate. This being able to be interpreted by my tuner, fine-tuning can commence

    #######

    All in all another big post by me, sorry 00**
    For reference, my tuning now is:

    Size / Resonant / Batter

    10" / E / D
    12" / B / A
    14" / F# / D#

    SN14" / G# / B
    Good!! It is definetly weird, as drums are a little different than plucking a string, like you said.

    It gets a little better if you're used to tuning other instruments, or at least singing. I tune all of mine by ear. I've done it enough to just kind of feel what the tension should be on all the heads. From there I just play the toms in ascending order and adjust the tension accordingly. Listen for your drums to sing "Her comes the bride" to you. It's an ear training trick. The first interval is a P4. We have tricks for all of them actually
    Sonor Force 3005 Sunburst
    (10,12,14ft,16ft,22)
    Pearl Vision VLX Ruby Fade
    (8,10,12,14ft,16ft,22)
    Paiste Alpha Cymbals
    All Pearl Hardware and pedals

  12. Registered User

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    506

    Default

    For reference, my tuning now is:

    Size / Resonant / Batter

    10" / E / D
    12" / B / A
    14" / F# / D#

    SN14" / G# / B
    KaaGeej,

    Bearing in mind you have your batter and resonant heads tuned to different notes, what is the resultant overall pitch when each drum is struck? I'd be very interested to know this, especially for your floor tom where there is more of an interval.
    Cheers

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