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  1. Registered User

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    Butnutz, if you are redoing this or updating it, submit a new thread and I will Sticky it..very informative material that everyone should read..thanks for taking the time to type that up..
    I play with strings and sticks.

  2. conqistador de pollo

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    DSM, ill be updating it and adding additional information as soon as i have the time. ill let you know.
    thanks
    Official Recording Tip of the month for November:

    Sometimes, things just need to go to 11.

  3. conqistador de pollo

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    Whats up folks, installment #2 with alot of information on microphones.

    I know, its hard to read without formatting, but im seriously working on putting together a PDF package with diagrams, but it might take a long time, so for now, i suppose yall can make due.


    Further Information About microphones that you should know:

    1] Polar Patterns
    -Microphones, as i am about to explain, are very sensitive to the sound in their environment. This is not to say that a microphone will transduce all sounds in a room, but a microphone will pick up sounds that are oriented properly to its capsule. This is known as “Axial Response”, and you will commonly hear microphones being referred to as “on axis” and “off axis (by ____ degrees)”.
    It is im portant to understand that A/C [alternating current] electricity is measured in 360 degrees, very much like a circle in geometry. It should be noted that microphone statistics and charts will actually use a circle to notate what the shape of the microphones’ pickup will be. The shape is known as the POLAR PATTERN.
    -Common Polar Patterns are:
    a] Cardioid
    -A roughly heart shaped pickup with excellent rear and side rejection.
    b] Omnidirectional
    -True “omni” pattern mics pick up all sound in a 360 degree field evenly.
    -Omni pattern mics do not exhibit proximity effect.
    c] Bi-Directional -OR- Figure-8 [same thing, different name]
    -Bi-directional mics have a pickup that is shaped like the number 8, or the infinity sign. This pattern has null points at 90 and 270 degrees, almost exactly.
    d] Other unidirectional patterns
    -Hypercardioid
    -Supercardioid
    -Ultracardioid
    -listed in order of least to most directional
    e] Boundry Mics
    -Boundary/PZM mics use a Hemispherical pattern.
    -basically the response is a dome shape, with the plate on the bottom of the mic being the flat/floor, and the dome being oriented upwards. The size of the area of pickup can be altered by the shape and size of the floor or wall the mic is mounted on.
    Other polar pattern information:
    -Cardioid is the most common pattern.
    -Some microphones will be switchable between polar patterns.
    -Most Microphones come with specs that notate graphically the polar pattern, and show the frequency response characteristics along the 360 degree field boundry.
    -the polar pattern of a mic can be temporarily altered by cupping the microphone around the head/capsule assembly. This is best exhibited by vocalists on stage cupping the head assembly of an sm58 or similar dynamic mic. This causes the mic to become near-omnidirectional in response, and generally causes the FOH engineer to lower the vocal to prevent a very very big problem: FEEDBACK.

    Pads, Rolloffs, etc...
    -Some mics have switches or rotating collars that notate certain things. Most commonly, high pass filters/lowcut filters, or attenuation pads.
    -A HP/LC Filter does exactly what you might think: Removes low frequency content from the signal at a set frequency and slope.
    Some microphones allow you to switch the rolloff frequency. Common rolloff frequencies are 75hz, 80hz, 100hz, 120hz, 125hz, and 250hz.

    -A pad in this example is a switch that lowers the output of the microphone deirectly after the capsule to prevent overloading the input of a microphone preamplifier.
    You might be asking: How is that possible?
    to which i reply: Some microphones put out a VERY HIGH SIGNAL LEVEL, sometimes about line level(-10/+4dbu), mic level is generally accepted to start at -75dbu and continues increasing until it becomes line level in voltage. It should be noted that linel level signals are normally of a different impedance than mic level signals, which is determined by the gear.
    an example for this would be: I mic the top of a snare drum with a large diaphragm condenser mic[solid state mic, not tube] that is capable of handling very high SPL[sound pressure level]. When the snare drum is played, the input of the micpre distorts, even with the gain turned all the way down. To combat this, i would use a pad with enough attenuation to defeat the distortion. In general, it is accepted to use a pad with only as much attentuation as you need, plus a small margin of error for extra “headroom”. What this means is that if you use a 20db pad where you only need a 10db pad, you will then have to add an additional 10db of gain to achieve a desireable signal level. This can cause problems, as not all pads sound good, or even transparent, and can color and affect your signal in sometimes unwanted ways that are best left unamplified.

    Other mic info:
    -when recording vocals, you should always use a popfilter.
    -a pop filter mounted on a gooseneck is generally more effective than a windscreen made of foam that slips over the microphone.
    the foam type often kill the highfrequency response, alter the polar pattern, and can introduce non-linear polarity problems(part of the frequency spectrum will be out of phase.)

    Terms Related to mics, mic technique, and other important things you should know:

    1] Plosives: “B”, “D”, “F”, “G”, “J”, “P”, “T” hard consonants and other vocal sounds that cause windblasts. These are responsible for a low frequency pop that can severly distort the diaphragm of the microphone, or cause a strange inconsistency of tonality by causing a short term proximity effect.

    2] Proximity effect: An exponential increase in low frequency response causes by having a microphone excessivly close to a sound. The force of the air moving actually causes the microphone’s diaphragm to move and sometimes distort, usually on vocalists.
    Microphones in a true OMNIDIRECTIONAL pattern do not exhibit proximity effect, and cardioid microphones exhibit the most pronounced proximity effect.
    With some practice, you can use proximity effect to your advantage, or as an effect. For example, if you are recording someone whispering, and it sounds thin, weak, and irritating due to the intenese high mid and high frequency content, get the person very close to a cardioid microphone with two popfilters, back to back...approx 1/2”-1” away from the mic and set your gain carefully, and you can achieve a very intimite recording of whispering.
    In a different scenario, you can place a mic inside of a kick drum between 1”-3” away from the inner shell, angled up and at the point of impact, and towards the floor tom. this captures[usually] a huge low end, and the sympathetic vibration of the floor tom on the kick drum hits, but retains a clarity of attack without: a] being distorted by the SPL of the drum, -and- b] capturing unplesant low-mid resonation of the kick drum head and shell that is common directly in the middle of the shell.
    Official Recording Tip of the month for November:

    Sometimes, things just need to go to 11.

  4. Registered User

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    -Home Recording for Musicians- I forgot the authers name but i read this book and its great...i highly recomend it. I do alot of recording and mastering, about one project a week, all live. I've taken a few classes with an owner and head engineer at a professional studio with his 30 years+ experience, and i'm fairly confedent in my knowledge... i don't have near the experience or knowledge as Butnutz but if you ever need any help, i can see what i can do if Butnutz is not around. I can also ask my amazing teacher. Oh ya, and i'm an experienced drummer who could help you in that aspect also... just send me a message... i'd be glad to help anyone (if i can) but you'd better ask Butnutz first.
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  5. Registered Abuser

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    Very cool thread! Very helpfull, since we want to do some recording ourselves!
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  6. conqistador de pollo

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    thanks for the kind words! audio engineering, music, and women are the only things that i ever really had a passion for, and so i make it my business to know as much as i can, and be as up to date as i can, while helping people understand as best as i can.

    though, this thread makes me wish i could change my display name to "Mr. Nutz" without deleting my profile.
    Official Recording Tip of the month for November:

    Sometimes, things just need to go to 11.

  7. Recording fanatic

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    Wow, ty! Do also have like some info on what to use on like on a bassdrum (EQ, effects, ..) and other parts of the drums?

    When I record my bassdrum fe, I use 2 mics. One for the boom and one for the 'thick' sound. But I don't really know which kind of reverb to use (and EQing) to restrain the bleed from other instruments.

    Maybe some tips?



    HOMEMADE KIT
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  8. conqistador de pollo

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    Quote Originally Posted by unclesam
    Wow, ty! Do also have like some info on what to use on like on a bassdrum (EQ, effects, ..) and other parts of the drums?

    When I record my bassdrum fe, I use 2 mics. One for the boom and one for the 'thick' sound. But I don't really know which kind of reverb to use (and EQing) to restrain the bleed from other instruments.

    Maybe some tips?
    i have a plan!

    can you perhaps email me or post 10 scond clips from each kik mic? sometimes the less than obvious or very weird looking kick mic placement sounds alot better(thats defintly not a rule by any means, it truly depends on tuning, playing technique and the room) PM me for my email address if you can send me those clips.

    when recording drums, there is little to be done to really get rid of bleed aside from microscopic editing or gating. gating tends to sound unnatural and weird if done incorrectly, and editing to that degree is intensly time consuming, and can sound every worse if done with even the smallest lapse in concentration.
    the most popular technique is to make a compromise between where the mic sounds best in relation to the source, where the mic sounds best in relation to the bleed, and where the mic is in phase with the other mics.
    basically, aim for 4 things when recording drums:
    1] have the drums sounding good in the room
    2] have the drums sounding good in the mics
    3] dont clip anything, be conservative with your levels
    4] make the bleed between microphones sound good before pressing record.
    Official Recording Tip of the month for November:

    Sometimes, things just need to go to 11.

  9. Recording fanatic

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    Ok, i'll also try to make some pics of how the mic's are placed.

    Ty for willing to help a 'new' commer to recording.



    HOMEMADE KIT
    DW Drums Tama Craviotto Ludwig Zildjian

    Rehearsal Studio
    Drum build

  10. Pinoy Drummer

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    this is honestly, the only thread here i have read from first to last page (maybe because it only has 3 pages).

    but seriously, this is very, very, very informative and should be a sticky thread.
    my only wish is that this thread would be the longest and that this thread won't die out on us....


    thanks everyone.
    especially buttnutz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  11. conqistador de pollo

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    Quote Originally Posted by p-mack
    this is honestly, the only thread here i have read from first to last page (maybe because it only has 3 pages).

    but seriously, this is very, very, very informative and should be a sticky thread.
    my only wish is that this thread would be the longest and that this thread won't die out on us....


    thanks everyone.
    especially buttnutz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    hey P-Mack!

    i am working on putting this thread into a PDF, so that i can incorporate additional diagrams. It will probably take me close to another 2 weeks before i am done with the first part (which includes this thread plus another 3 or 4 pages.) Once that is done, i will find somewhere to host the file.
    Additionally, i may convert each individual page into a JPG or GIF, and have the text displayed as a 1024x768 jpg, so that it is both formatted and downloadable.
    When that is all said and done, this thread will be deleted, and a moderator(hopefully) will Sticky the new thread with pictures and whatnot.


    unclesam:
    cool, ill take a look when you post the pics.
    can you list the gear you use to record? really, the signal chain of your kick drum will do just fine.


    TO EVERYONE:
    i changed my account preferences so you are welcome to PM or Email me, and the forum should let you.
    -Mr. Nutz
    Official Recording Tip of the month for November:

    Sometimes, things just need to go to 11.

  12. Registered User

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    Mr. Nutz,

    Thank you so much putting this together. You have obviously taken a great deal of time and care in preparing this, and those of us who are new to the "other side of the glass" highly appreciate you sharing your vast wealth of knowledge and practical real-world experience which will take years off our individual learning curve; and make our tentative first ventures in to recording, engineering, and producing much more effective, successful, and pleasant than they otherwise may have been.

    THIS is what the PDF is all about.

    Respectfully,
    Todd Richardson

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