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  1. Registered User

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    Default Snare Shell Info

    Here is some information on various snare shells and their characteristics.These reviews are brought to you by http://www.drumsolo.cc/snare_drums/s...e_gallery.html Very nice place with extensive info for the sharing
    This information is also copyrighted. You may not use these for selling, classified purposes. if you do wish to use these reviews elsewhere, you MUST get approval first by heading to the link above. Failure to do so will result in immediate action.

    List will be updated with as many possible shell types available for a snare.

    Multi-ply, Segment and Stave
    Within the category of wood shells, there are four types: multiple-ply, one-ply, segment and stave shells. To learn more about the different characteristics of various woods, click here.

    Multiple plies have the advantage of strength, but have compromised some sound qualities to achieve their durability. The adhesives used between the plies act as an insulator, inhibiting the vibration of the shell. These drums are the least expensive of the wooden snare drums.

    One-ply shells resonate more freely than multiple-ply shells, which is a large reason for their popularity. They sound great. The disadvantage to one-ply shells is the tendency to go "out of round". Reinforcement hoops are placed inside the shell to stabilize it, but these hoops choke the drum. One-ply shells do sound great, but they are also the most expensive of the wooden drums.

    Segment and stave shells have very little adhesive to inhibit the vibration of the shell, but they are not a single unit as with the one-ply shell. Some people do not like the look of the segment shells, but it is remarkably strong and offers great sound and the ability to use woods that might not be available in one-ply shells. Besides being very resonant, these drums are also worth checking into because of their price point. They are typically less expensive than one-ply shells, and offer terrific resonance and fabulous sound that, in my opinion, rivals if not surpasses that of one-ply shells.




    wood snare drum characteristics

    1-PLY WHITE ASH: compared to maple, this wood will have a wider tuning range and give a high, crisp sound without requiring a tight head tension. Modern Drummer Magazine described the sound as "bright and reflective".

    1-PLY RED OAK: this drum will have a staccato type sound to it. Notes will be shorter and more defined than with a maple shell. Red Oak will also give a deeper, warmer sound than maple.

    TEAK SEGMENT: these drums will be sensitive and have a very wide tuning range. Modern Drummer Magazine described it as "a rich woody tone, with lots of projection". This is a very versatile snare drum.

    PURPLE HEART SEGMENT: these will probably be one of the most resonant drums you will ever hear. Expect a lot of resonance and sensitivity from these drums (if you can find one).

    CHERRY SEGMENT: expect these drums to be bright, crisp, and have plenty of "in your face" attitude and projection.
    Last edited by DeadSkinMask; 04-09-2007 at 06:35 AM.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    BIRCH

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Very clean tone with little over ring.

    Dynamic Range: Birch is cleaner at low volume than the Maple. It has a good dynamic range that doesn't change character sound from low to high volume.

    Tonal Range: More frequency range than Maple. Maple seems one-dimensional, limited by having mostly high frequencies, in comparison to Birch.

    Tuning Range: Tunes quickly and easily. Tuned into the low end, Birch produces a full response at all dynamics using single, double, and buzz strokes. When tuned high, the bottom head should be looser than it would be on a Maple drum.

    Resonance/Decay: Quick decay with little over ring.

    Cross Stick: Rim shots are powerful but dry (little over ring). Cross stick gave several good, distinct, and wide ranging (tonally) useable pitches. One of the most versatile for cross stick we have encountered. Cross stick is richer than on Maple. Maple cross stick is high end only, the Birch is fuller sounding.

    Volume: Comparable to Maple.

    Sensitivity: Cleaner than Maple at real low volume. Makes Maple sound "muddy".

    Comments: Excellent studio drum
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Granadillo

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Plenty of high crack, supported with strong mid and low frequencies. Has a full, rich, warm presence. A drier sounding drum with a more defined fundamental in the sweetspot (center) of the drum.

    Dynamic Range: Maple has an overtone consistently throughout all dynamic levels, while the Granadillo has a very "clean" sound.

    Pitch: Plenty of lows, good mids, and a great crack. Good range of frequencies yielding a full sounding drum. The fundamental pitch is lower than Maple.

    Tonal Range: Gives a good range of frequencies that Maple lacks. The Granadillo has high-end frequencies, which seemed to really kick in at louder volumes, giving a cleaner, more powerful and fuller sounding drum.

    Tuning Range: The Granadillo went to a really low head tension, just above "no tension", and went as tight as Maple before choking.

    Resonance/Decay: Good resonance. Sharp sounding.

    Cross Stick: Has a more "forgiving", consistent cross stick sound with a ˝ inch movement in stick location. Maple is all high-end frequencies and the pitch changes with any small change in stick location. The Granadillo cross stick is fuller and richer than the Maple.

    Volume: Similar to Maple.

    Sensitivity: Good snare sound/activation as playing moves from the sweetspot toward the rim.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Jatoba or Brazilian Cherry

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Higher in pitch than Maple when tuned comparably, but this drum requires a lower tuning. The Jatoba has mid and low frequencies with a distinguished high over tone. When tuned where the drum wants to be, the Jatoba has a vintage sound, but has a fullness to it that many vintage Maple drums lack.

    Dynamic Range: Full and explosive at high volume. Good at low volume but not as explosive.

    Tonal Range: Full sounding in Mid to Low ranges but has a lot of high over ring, which we could not eliminate by tuning.

    Tuning Range: Limited tuning range. It needs to be tuned where the drum wants to be tuned. Tune the bottom head down, and the top head to a medium tension. This tuning yields a "fat" or "tubby" vintage sound. We had to use a tiny bit of muffling near the edge of the head to bring the over ring into an acceptable range.

    Resonance/Decay: Principal note is shorter than the Maple. The "sweetspot" extends about 1.5 inches out from the center of the drum, with slightly less over ring in that sweetspot. This drum has one of the largest playing areas we have encountered. The sound of the drum remains full even near the edge of the drum.

    Cross Stick: Small area where the cross stick sounds good.

    Volume: More mid and low frequencies kick in around MF volume. Jatoba has slightly more volume than our Maple comparison drum.

    Sensitivity: Lots of snare sound all the way out to the edge of the head. A very "snarey" sounding drum. Good snare activation at all volumes.

    Once the over ring is reduced, it has a very full and fat vintage sound. This drum would be a sound engineer's nightmare, due to that over ring. Jatoba has limited application, so this drum is not suited for someone looking for a versatile drum. If however, you want a full, rich, vintage sound for uses such as with a big band, it is definitely worth checking into. Visually, Jatoba makes a very beautiful drum.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Hickory

    weighing slightly more than maple. Hickory is slightly higher in pitch, and the note is a tiny bit longer than the maple, although the maple overring lingers longer. The Hickory has a fuller, richer sound than maple. It seems to have more of the lows and mids that maple has, but also has high frequencies. The volume and tuning range are very similar to maple. Bottom line for me, its a fuller sounding drum than the maple. Maple sounds "flat" in comparison to the hickory.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Bubinga

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Bubinga has a warmer sound than many of the woods we have tested. It is rich and warm with dominant mid-range frequencies, yet its fundamental pitch is higher than Maple.

    Dynamic Range: Doesn't change character sound from ppp to fff.

    Tonal Range: Has a small sweet spot extending approximately 1.5 inch from the center, allowing for numerous sound options.

    Tuning Range: Favors a looser tuning. Bubinga goes low, but loses overtones when tuned high, becoming more mono-tone.

    Resonance/Decay: Less over ring than Maple. Cross stick is resonant in several positions.

    Cross Stick: Rim shots spread the tone. A slight amount of dampening can eliminate the head ring from rim shots. Rim shots are also less focused than on a Maple drum. With a change in stick position, the cross stick has a change in pitch range similar to that of Maple

    Volume: Slightly more volume at fff and with very hard hits it doesn't choke out as quickly as Maple.

    Sensitivity: Great snare response at ppp. Good response overall
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Chechen or Caribbean Rosewood

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Chechen has a lower fundamental pitch than our Maple comparison drum. Full bodied and rich sounding with a nice "presence".
    Dynamic Range: The character sound of the drum remains the same from pp (very quiet) to ff (very loud) with a sweetspot similar in size to Maple.
    Tonal Range: It has predominantly mid-range frequencies, with some low as well as high frequencies, giving it a full, rich textured sound.
    Tuning Range: Tunes down nicely. The note gets shorter as the tuning goes from loose to medium tension. The Chechen went slightly tighter than the Maple drum before choking, but was still lower in pitch than the Maple drum. Chechen has a softer feel to it than our Maple drum, without the "table-top" feel at higher tension.
    Resonance/Decay: Less focused than Maple with a "spreading" sound. Chechen is more resonant and has a longer principal note than Maple.
    Cross Stick: Full bodied and low in pitch. One-half inch of movement gave a pronounced change in pitch.
    Volume: Slightly louder than Maple.
    Sensitivity: Good sensitivity that responds well at all volumes, with nice projection across the room.
    Comments: Change in pitch on the cross stick could be troublesome, or allow for more sounds depending on the situation. Great feel to the drum with good stick rebound
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Claro Walnut

    The weight is very close to Maple and it is of medium density. Claro Walnut is two types of walnut that are grafted, yielding the wild, wavy figure and beautiful burl. The sound of the Walnut is darker than the Maple. It has a deeper pitch but a good crack when you lay into the drum. The walnut maintained its sound character at all volumes. It is slightly quieter than Maple, although this perception is probably due to the Walnut having fewer high frequencies than the Maple. Walnut has more body and a fuller range of frequencies than Maple. The cross stick is deeper in pitch than Maple, cuts more, and is a cleaner. There is more snare sensitivity than with Maple, and it is not as dry. It would make an excellent jazz or blues drum, especially for those who use the darker sounds of "K" cymbals
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Peroba

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Dry. Very singular sounding with not many overtones in the center of the drum.
    Dynamic Range: Higher volume loses dryness as more overtones kick in.
    Tonal Range: Peroba has a focus on the mid and high frequencies. Three inches out from the center of the drum, it loses mid range, gains some high overtones, and sounds higher in pitch. These small "zones" of sounds occur every couple of inches as you get closer to the rim.
    Tuning Range: Lowering the tuning "softens" the sound of the drum as some of the definition goes away. This drum prefers a tight tuning, but not to the extreme.
    Resonance/Decay: 2 sweetspots. Small sweetspot in the center is dry and monotone. The second sweetspot is about three inches out from center and has more ring and overtones.
    Cross Stick: Very tonal cross rim sound. A "woodier" sound than the Maple and a truer clave sound. Clean and defined. Unlike the Maple, the cross stick/rim was easily found.
    Volume: Higher frequencies are more pronounced at higher volumes, with more over ring.
    Sensitivity: This snare is tight and responsive, particularly near the center.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Purpleheart

    Full, rich bodied with a clean, defined tone. Purpleheart maintains its sound character at low volumes, while Maple drums tend to lose some of the mid and low frequencies. The Purpleheart has a full dynamic range, but Maple has a little more "crack". Purpleheart has an emphasis on mid and low frequencies. It doesn't choke as quickly as Maple when tuned tight. Purpleheart has a shorter principal note, is more resonant, and has fewer overtones than Maple. The cross stick is lower in pitch, louder, and richer sounding with more cut and a larger sweet spot than Maple. The overall volume is also slightly louder than Maple. A great drum for someone who wants a full-bodied snare for all applications. We like the Purpleheart. A plus is its stunning appearance.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Zebrawood

    Timbre/Tonal Color: The zebrawood has a higher fundamental pitch than our maple comparison drum. It has an “open” resonance to it, with lower and higher frequencies than the maple drum. The principal note is shorter than the maple, but not as short as jarrah.

    Dynamic Range : Cleaner and more defined than the maple drum The feel of the drum is also nice. Good stick response/rebound with no “mushy” or “tabletop” feel.

    Tonal Range : The frequency range opened up slightly (more lows and highs) as the head strike position moved from the center of the head toward the rim. The zebrawood has more high and low end with fewer mid range frequencies than the maple drum.

    Tuning Range: Tuning the top head only, the zebrawood went to a looser tuning than our maple drum, but choked sooner when we took it tight. At a tight tuning the zebrawood became “boxy”. Overall, the range is similar to that of maple, just lower.

    Resonance/Decay: Dry. Clean. Not as much over ring and not as “pingy”.

    Cross Stick: Consistent in pitch with a change in stick position. The maple was higher in pitch, then lower in pitch than the zebrawood as our stick (the part on the head, not on the rim) moved towards the center of the drum. The zebrawood had a larger usable area for cross stick. Like the head strike sound, the cross stick was cleaner, but also had a “woodier” sound than the maple comparison drum. Nice rich, full sounding cross stick.

    Volume: Equivalent to our maple drum.

    Sensitivity: Great sensitivity! The lightest possible tap produced a nice snare response. More articulate and sensitive to small dynamic changes than the maple drum. . The zebrawood kept its character sound from low to high volume.
    I play with strings and sticks.

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    Carbon Fiber

    Carbon fiber is a composite material based on the raw element carbon. The process of manufacturing raw carbon fibers is very complex and there are only a handful of companies who actually supply thousands of textile weavers who then take the carbon bundles and weave them into carbon fiber cloth. This carbon fiber material can be manufactured to different specifications depending on the application.
    When Carbon Fiber is combined with epoxy resins and cured properly, the result is a very stable structure, which is very resistant to change. It can be formed in many different shapes and is currently being used extensively in Aerospace and Military applications.
    Because of the diversity of Carbon Fiber and composite manufacturing, many characteristics can be altered or enhanced using a combination of materials. Different combinations of core material epoxy resin, and other cloth types are often combined with Carbon Fiber to achieve the desired results. Due to the tight bonds formed by carbon, layers are very stable and rarely delaminate when combined properly.

    Timbre/Tonal Color: Overall it was surprisingly similar to our Maple control drum (8-ply Keller shell). The carbon fiber had a lower fundamental pitch. It also had a slightly compressed monotone sound that the maple did not have. Our maple drum was slightly “sharper” sounding than the carbon fiber.

    Dynamic Range: Carbon fiber seems to work best in larger drums. The kit we tested 2 years ago sounded best with the big drums, but we found the small drums lacked the bottom end of the bigger drums. I also played in a band in which the bass player had a bass made with a carbon fiber neck. He mentioned that the low notes sounded great, but the higher notes didn’t have the same body and depth.

    Tonal Range: The sweet spot size and amount of over ring are very similar to our maple drum.

    Tuning Range: The carbon fiber took the same head tunings as our maple drum. It went as low and as tight before choking.

    Resonance/Decay: Also nearly identical to our maple drum. We could not tell any significant difference.

    Cross Stick: Rim shots sound slightly compressed. The cross stick area and sound was nearly identical to our maple drum.

    Volume: Our carbon fiber drum liked to be hit hard. We found it had more body and bottom end when played at higher volume. There was an added “kick” from the bottom end when we reached a volume around MF (medium loud) to F (Loud). The carbon fiber drum was slightly louder than our maple drum, which was true in the kit we tested a few years ago also.

    Sensitivity: Good response at all volumes. The carbon fiber is very similar to maple
    I play with strings and sticks.

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