Pearl Drummers Forum - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 12 of 16
  1. Registered User

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,220

    Default Why are Electronic Kits so expensive?

    5,000+ for a roland V-Tour... why? How do they get away with charging such an insane amount of money for this stuff? Does it honestly cost that much to make an electronic kit? I realize that the brains of the kit are expensive, but no more than 1,000 dollars usually... where does that other 4,000+ come from? It certainly doesn't come from hand built maple shells, or hand hammered cast bronze cymbals, and I could get a beautiful acoustic set for much less... hardware and cymbals included... anyone really know why they charge so freaking much for this stuff?

  2. Registered User

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    12,853

    Default

    because you touch yourself at night

    (always wanted to say that)

    Pearl BCX in Lava Bubinga | Pics
    22x18 (2), 8x7, 10x8, 12x9, 14x14, 16x16, 14x6.5" Pearl Kapur snare drum

    Pearl VBA in Dynamite Burst e-kit | Pics
    22x18, 10x7, 12x8, 14x12, 16x14, 14x5.5 matching snare

  3. Registered User

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    It comes from marketing! I don't really know myself. What I do know though, is that for 5g's or whatever for a roland td20, you get PLASTIC clamps and a PLASTIC rack. Frankly, i'd want solid silver ones for that. My TD6 cost me 800 new, which was a good deal. It doesn't really feel like it's worth that, but for the amount of use I get out of it, i'm happy.
    Tama Rockstar 10,12,14,16
    12x7 Black Panter Maple\Cherry
    13x3.5 Black Panther Steel
    14x6.5 Black Panther Birdseye Maple
    14x6 Tama Starclassic G-Maple
    Roland TD6
    Paiste

  4. Magic Moderation-Superviser

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Well, it's not about the materials used here, it's more about the research, programming, design, inventing. Getting a mesh head to react properly and consistently without making a whole lot of noise isn't really that easy.
    By reading this signature, you have now agreed to be my good 'ol buddy, and purchase many expensive drum things for me from now until I release you from this duty :)

  5. Registered User

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    on your last nerve
    Posts
    2,677

    Default

    the drum brains are expensive
    Mapex Orion Orbiter Tobacco Fade
    22x18, 10x7, 12x8, 14x14, 16x15
    also
    Yamaha DTXPress II
    Sonor Force 2001

    My Orion Orbiter(Pro-M)

    A Mollusk Secretion, The Best Reason To Play Drums.

  6. lolerz too HxC for u

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Lasalle,Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    8,592

    Default

    It costs that much because people are willing to pay the price. If no one bought one the price would be low, but there are poeple buying the kits.
    Put this in your sig if you love AAXplosion crashes!!!!!!

    My Kit



    Support the artists.
    Put this in your signature if you actually buy music

  7. Registered User

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Look at the R & D departement at Roland, then look at the one at Pearl.

    Roland are constantly developing their technology. Having used E-drums since the mid-80's, I've noticed the progress made. 10 years ago, to trigger samples from a pad, you had to purchase something like an Alesis sampler, a midi converter, a pad and a rack to mount everything in. (it weighed alot and was very expensive).
    Now, you can go to your local music store and pick-up a Roland SPD-S which does all that, has an on-board sequencer, sound modeling and it's reliable. It's also $700.00CAN.

    Accoustic drum manufacturers in the past 15 years have brought us better hardware, nicer finishes and vent holes.

    Just my 0.02$

  8. Lifetime Pearl Drummer/DT fan

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    2,800

    Default

    They know they have a superior product and people will pay for it.
    Supply and demand. They need more competition to drive the price down.

  9. oceansized

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Leeds, UK
    Posts
    1,014

    Default

    I see where you're coming from.

    All there is on the pads is a transistor attached to the head and the rim, that's it, there's no real amount of research gone on here, a meshhead and a couple of transistors mounted on moulded plastic.

    I'd be more inclined to pay the cash for Danny Carey's new electronic pads, dunno what they're called but the note changes throughout the surface tension of the head, like a real drum, now that's research!

    Most of the roland's have tons of stuff on them that you don't need, they're just over-engineered without tackling the real problem with electric drums, as in you get the same note no matter where you hit the head with the stick.

    Yeah, and a plastic rack, that's ridiculous. My friends shop has many roland kits, the rack breaks every 2 months, they order a new one, that breaks etc etc.

    I think they're expensive coz they're cool, and I also think that many people are stumping up the cash to buy one because they probably live next door to someone who constantly moans at them whilst trying to practice the instrument they love.

    I have an old TD5, bought second hand but it still works well. the pads are rubbish but I have a v-drum for my snare.

  10. Registered User

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Phildelphia, PA
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Just get a set on eBay. Will save you sooooo much money. I just got a Vdrum set with two kick pedals and some real cymbals thrown in for $1500. Worth the price to be able to practice whenever I want.

  11. oceansized

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Leeds, UK
    Posts
    1,014

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Solace666
    Just get a set on eBay. Will save you sooooo much money. I just got a Vdrum set with two kick pedals and some real cymbals thrown in for $1500. Worth the price to be able to practice whenever I want.
    I think that's the key, it's about practicing, every drummer needs to practice but not everyone has a place that they can, so electrics are the only answer.

    As a result of me buying an electric kit, I then started to build my own little home studio, which then led me to start writing my own material. If you can find a cheap one, do it, then get BFD and trigger those samples instead (depending on how good your computer is). Then you might end up buying a guitar, bass, mixing desk etc like me, but it's really rewarding if you can get into it.

  12. Registered User

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by interceptor
    I'd be more inclined to pay the cash for Danny Carey's new electronic pads, dunno what they're called but the note changes throughout the surface tension of the head, like a real drum, now that's research!

    Most of the roland's have tons of stuff on them that you don't need, they're just over-engineered without tackling the real problem with electric drums, as in you get the same note no matter where you hit the head with the stick.
    It sounds like what you are referring to is "positional sensing"--where you get a different sound if you strike the pad near the edge than you would if you hit dead center.

    Roland has had that capability for many years. (I suspect that most others do too but I am not that familiar with other modules.)

    You're right that there are not any expensive components in a mesh-head pad. The electronic components in most drums are the same items that you find in sneakers that light up when you walk or greeting cards that play a song when you open them. You can buy piezo-transducers at Radio Shack for much less than the cost of a Big Mac.

    I suspect that a lot of money goes into designing the sound modules. A lot of money also goes into marketing the thing. Since there are few competitors, demand probably keeps prices up on the modules as well.

    There are options to save money on the pads. You can buy from Pintech or Hart for quite a bit less than Roland. You can also build them yourself VERY inexpensively.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •