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  1. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jookbox
    lol
    heheh

  2. "lalala"...

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    birch have more punch in toms and bassdrum
    Mapex Pro M special 15th anniversary kit (in Jade Fade)
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  3. Gone by choice!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neo666
    birch>popalar. birch is used in "pro" quality kits. fopalar is a lesser quality sound for drums imho. go with the birch. gretsch birch kits sound amazing
    I totally agree!

  4. Registered User

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    The difference in Drum shell material is basically Marketing, pure and simple
    The Engineering of drums makes it clear that the material used for shell construction has more to do with drum tension than drum sound.

    Consider the facts
    1- Plies of wood are glued together, not fused or welded but glued, basically they form a sandwich
    2- Plies of wood are used for strength not to deliver sound
    3- As air is displaced within a drum by impacting the head it never penetrates the shell, it exits the vent and displaces the resonant head (if there is one present), aka it takes the path of least resistance (don’t believe this? Plug up your vent hole and attempt to play a drum with both heads installed)
    4- Tensioning the head against the bearing edge, seals the head (and the atmosphere – air) to the interior of the drum (not the exterior). The bearing edges will have a profound effect on the sound of a drum, as they determine how much contact the shell has with the head surface. More contact = a dampened sound, Less contact = creates attack and overtones.
    5- The Drum head construction has everything to do with drum sound. The thickness of a drum head will dampen the sound as it increases… This condition is exacerbated when multiple plies are added, and hydraulics between the plies enter the equation
    6- Think about it …. Drum shells have been made from all types of materials, metal, brass, wood, plastics, fiberglass, and they all sound like …… Well ….. Drums
    7- The hype over drum material is marketing driven. The Recording Custom (YD9000) is probably the most recorded drum ever and its shells are birch with a thick epoxy applied to the inside of the shell and most of the earlier models all had laminate affixed to the outside of the shell.

    So what is important in Drum Shell Manufacturing?
    a. The cut ends of the shells must be square with the shell exterior
    b. The bearing edges (type of cut, 30, 45, 60, ball bat etc)
    c. The flatness of the bearing edges (fully contact the head)
    d. The ability of a wood shell structure not to be affected by variation in temperature and humidity
    e. The amount of air allowed to move in and out of the shell
    f. The structural rigidity of the shell itself (must hold tension, reason plies are used in wood shells)
    g. Tension lugs and rods (to both tension and not rattle about as the rods move with impact deflection)
    h. The tension hoops ability to retain tension as the head is impacted (keep the head sealed to the drum)
    i. The tension hoops ability to evenly spread even tension about the head tension ring
    j. The forming of the drum head and its tension ring
    k. The process of keeping the shell lamination ends correctly aligned and spaced as the shells lamination's are glued
    L. The repeatably of the shell manufacturing process (must produce the same result every time)

    Did I not say drum shell material … Nope… because its not that important in generating drum sound? Its just marketing hype … as long as a strong structure is available and the above conditions are met … the drum will sound like ….. a drum
    Last edited by TJH; 04-11-2019 at 09:11 AM.

  5. Registered User

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    There is quite a bit of Marketing hype out there related to wooden drums and the type of wood used to construct the drum shell. However, engineering wise.... its just that .... Hype... as the material used to construct wooden drum shells has very little to do with a drums sound. Shells are structural not sound producing. Sound comes from the head and the vibrations they generate

  6. anti-shark cage?

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    Congrats on bumping a 14 year old thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan12 View Post
    Oh, so you quote everyone but me? I see how it is...

  7. Registered User

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    Jun 2018
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    The big problem with cheap poplar kits is not the wood itself.

    1) The muffling wrap - cheap kits glue the wrap in just one area. So it isn't really bonding with the shell. It's just muffling them. Take the wrap off and leave it off.

    2) Bearing edges - these can be cut pretty carelessly on cheap kits . Once the wrap is off, if they are bad, have some new ones cut.

    3) Heads/Tuning - Buy some good Remo/Evans heads and learn how to tune them.
    Last edited by Track12; 04-12-2019 at 02:21 PM.

  8. Drumming Since 1943

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    Quote Originally Posted by TJH View Post
    There is quite a bit of Marketing hype out there related to wooden drums and the type of wood used to construct the drum shell. However, engineering wise.... its just that .... Hype... as the material used to construct wooden drum shells has very little to do with a drums sound. Shells are structural not sound producing. Sound comes from the head and the vibrations they generate
    Get outta here with that common sense!
    Way Too Much Crap

  9. PDF 8a5h1ng T3am C4p

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    Today I learned birtch>popular.

  10. Registered User

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    I'd say the 3 main shell woods used are maple, birch and mahogany, with the first two often being used on their own, but the latter only used in combination.
    Pearl Prestige Session Select SRX 1998 in black mist
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  11. Rogue Ex-Mod

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    Quote Originally Posted by TJH View Post
    There is quite a bit of Marketing hype out there related to wooden drums and the type of wood used to construct the drum shell. However, engineering wise.... its just that .... Hype... as the material used to construct wooden drum shells has very little to do with a drums sound. Shells are structural not sound producing. Sound comes from the head and the vibrations they generate
    Welcome to the PDF.
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