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64 ludwig, advice to clean kit

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  • fayray
    replied
    Totally agree with 3pearlkits. I have refurbished many kits and Novus has never caused damage. It takes out the light surface scratches and leaves a nice lustrous finish. I finish off with an automotive wax.

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  • The Kurgan
    replied
    Originally posted by 3pearlkits View Post
    That is partially true, and for antiques is perhaps the best way to go, with some items. The generally accepted definition of antique is over 100 years old. The criteria for worth in antiques is complete, original and condition. The same criteria applies to collectables. If an item falls down in any one of those criteria, the item's value is degraded. You will also notice however, that say, an antique silver object on that show is never tarnished and covered in dust, otherwise untouched or not cleaned since the day/year of it's manufacture. That tarnish is silver oxidisation, most often than not cleaned up with (eg) silvo, which happens to be the one of the least abrasive polishes for silver. In that instance you never hear "it's value has gone down because it has been cleaned/polished of tarnish". Some people like patina on their cymbals. Yet others dislike patina, wanting their cymbals bright and shiny. I'm not overly sure that bright shiny old cymbals attract a lower price than patinaed ones, where the status is age (proven by recorded different date stamps or logo's), lack of keyholing and not cracked, and that determines value rather than patina or absence of it. In this particular case, I would say that what the OP has posted up is incomplete (as a kit) anyway, unless he can categorically prove that the original sale was a bass drum, tom and snare, with no floor tom. That proof would be called provenance, and being able to supply provenance also raises value. So, the dulling of the wrap at present means the value of the item is degraded already (compared to a pristine example). I would polish it, carefully. With the right polish for the job, in this case Novus plastic polish. I wouldn't use a scourer on the wrap, nor steel wool on the hardware, as both those products would definitely cause harm. Finally, it belongs to the OP, he/she can do what they want. Not having a go at you by any means. I've been dealing in, and collecting antiques and vintage items for at least the last decade. Most of it has been restored to original condition, by me...
    All good advice, you sound like you know what your doing. Some people have a real knack for re-finishing things. My dad is great at re-finishing furniture.... Not me, I just don't have the patience which is why I'd not do it or seek the advice from someone like you that has more experience. Now I know who to bug if I need help
    Last edited by The Kurgan; 05-01-2014, 09:56 PM.

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  • sully21
    replied
    Oh the kits not really going to have a lot of value, I already know that. It's gonna be mix match. The snare drums pre serial number keystone badge, tom is late 64 and base is early 64 I plan to add another floor tom hopefully from 64. Really my goal with this kit is to have a nice looking, great sounding vintage kit. I don't want to take the wrap of, I would like to maintain it's authenticity but I'm aware having a mix matched kit isn't worth as much. But another cool thing about it is I bought it with all wfl hardware and pedals!

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  • 3pearlkits
    replied
    Originally posted by FL Drummer View Post
    One thing I've learned from watching the antique roadshow is if you have ANY item that has some wear & tear on it leave it alone. An original less than perfect finish is always worth more than one that somebody tried to clean up and like chilledbongo said damaged the finish. I see that scenario on that show every time I watch it, Somebody tried to clean up their item & actually lowered the value.
    That is partially true, and for antiques is perhaps the best way to go, with some items.
    The generally accepted definition of antique is over 100 years old.
    The criteria for worth in antiques is complete, original and condition. The same criteria applies to collectables.
    If an item falls down in any one of those criteria, the item's value is degraded.

    You will also notice however, that say, an antique silver object on that show is never tarnished and covered in dust, otherwise untouched or not cleaned since the day/year of it's manufacture. That tarnish is silver oxidisation, most often than not cleaned up with (eg) silvo, which happens to be the one of the least abrasive polishes for silver. In that instance you never hear "it's value has gone down because it has been cleaned/polished of tarnish".

    Some people like patina on their cymbals. Yet others dislike patina, wanting their cymbals bright and shiny.
    I'm not overly sure that bright shiny old cymbals attract a lower price than patinaed ones, where the status is age (proven by recorded different date stamps or logo's), lack of keyholing and not cracked, and that determines value rather than patina or absence of it.

    In this particular case, I would say that what the OP has posted up is incomplete (as a kit) anyway, unless he can categorically prove that the original sale was a bass drum, tom and snare, with no floor tom. That proof would be called provenance, and being able to supply provenance also raises value.
    So, the dulling of the wrap at present means the value of the item is degraded already (compared to a pristine example). I would polish it, carefully. With the right polish for the job, in this case Novus plastic polish. I wouldn't use a scourer on the wrap, nor steel wool on the hardware, as both those products would definitely cause harm.
    Finally, it belongs to the OP, he/she can do what they want.

    Not having a go at you by any means.

    I've been dealing in, and collecting antiques and vintage items for at least the last decade. Most of it has been restored to original condition, by me...

    Leave a comment:


  • The Kurgan
    replied
    Originally posted by chilledbongo View Post
    that looks like normal fading .... there is nothing, to my knowledge, that would completely remove it....and you don't really see it with all the hardware on. putting any kind of abrasive polish on it, you run the risk of damaging something that is 50 years old. id leave well enough alone.
    One thing I've learned from watching the antique roadshow is if you have ANY item that has some wear & tear on it leave it alone. An original less than perfect finish is always worth more than one that somebody tried to clean up and like chilledbongo said damaged the finish. I see that scenario on that show every time I watch it, Somebody tried to clean up their item & actually lowered the value.

    Leave a comment:


  • chilledbongo
    replied
    that looks like normal fading .... there is nothing, to my knowledge, that would completely remove it....and you don't really see it with all the hardware on.

    putting any kind of abrasive polish on it, you run the risk of damaging something that is 50 years old. id leave well enough alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • vbdrummer
    replied
    I had an early 70's Ludwig in red sparkle and one of the toms had faded. I used NuFinish polish/wax and got pretty good results. Inexpensive and might be worth a shot. Nice kit!

    Leave a comment:


  • fayray
    replied
    Originally posted by sully21 View Post
    Where would you buy that polish?
    If you are in America I believe your local Harley dealer will stock it too.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3pearlkits
    replied
    Originally posted by sully21 View Post
    Where would you buy that polish?
    Search on e-bay in your country for: Novus plastic polish kit.

    That will give you polish numbers 1, 2 and three.

    Three is for the harshest scratching, so use 2 then 1 in this instance...

    Leave a comment:


  • sully21
    replied
    Where would you buy that polish?

    Leave a comment:


  • fayray
    replied
    I would say that the wrap has faded and maybe gone a bit milky. I would wipe it down with a damp cloth and then polish the wrap using Novus No2 polish. It may not completely get rid of the haze but it does an amazingly good job of taking out fine scratches and I'm sure it'll make those drums look a whole lot better. I wouldn't dream about rewrapping those drums as that would halve their value and you'd lose all that vintage mojo. Novus the wrap and you'll be amazed how good it will look. Good luck

    Leave a comment:


  • sully21
    started a topic 64 ludwig, advice to clean kit

    64 ludwig, advice to clean kit

    Hey I have a 1964 ludwig I'm trying to clean them up. The finish has a haze on it was wondering if anyone knew how to get rid of it? Just want to know if it's possible or do I have to re wrap?

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