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  • #16
    sim_lee17: What would you know about tuning heads :P
    I think a fair amount.

    Is this the question you wanted answered?
    Prof.Sound is the Author of the Drum Tuning Bible available at no charge to forum readers here.

    Version 3 PDF Download now available for download!

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    • #17
      sim_lee17 while your floating around, can you answer my question?! do you have to tighten it a bit then put pressure on, or just hand tighten then put pressure on?!
      I assume you mean me?

      I wrote all this out just for you!

      Seating: Things are changing in the manufacturing of heads. When the head is first mounted, the objective is to get the head to seat itself. Seating the head is where you create that all-important bond between the bearing edge of the drum and the film and cause the head collar to become tight to the hoop. Seating is often also referred to as putting more that normal tension on the head. This seating process, whereby you put the head under heavy tension to form it to the bearing edge is not required to get a good tuning. However, the pre-stretch that occurs during the high tension event can aid in minimizing the need to tune back up to pitch more often. Moreover, if your bearing edges are good and sharp, less tension may be required. If the head is pulled tight on side it may fail to be centered on the drum and its ability to produce an even harmonic tone may be inhibited. Uneven tensioning can limit the ability to tune a head to its lowest potential note and also create premature buzzing, or a “distorted” tone.

      The Process:

      1. Remove both old heads, inspect the drum, thump it and eliminate rattles and buzzes.

      2. Set the drum on an absorbent surface, such as carpet or blanket.

      3. With batter side down, resonant side facing up put the resonant head on.
      (Note as inserted by editor - that would be me: Note the red colored sections below.)


      4. Tighten all lugs just to the point where contact is made with the washer or rim. Once contact is made with the washer/rim, back-off 1/4 turn.

      5. Using two keys 180 degrees apart (or in the case of an odd number of lugs use 1 key in a star type pattern), tighten in half turn increments together until you've put 2 complete turns on all rods of the drum. The musical note is not important.

      6. Lift the drum up a few inches, hit the head once and see if it is a distortion free sound. If not give each lug another 1/4 of one full turn. Repeat until the drum is distortion free. Do not be afraid to really tighten the head above a normal playing pitch, it is essential that the head produce a clear undistorted tone before proceeding.

      7. Place the drum back down on the carpet with the side you are tuning facing up.

      8. Tap with the drum key, lightly and with even force about 1.5” (40mm) from the edge. ALWAYS tap with equal force and in the same place at each lug. LISTEN to an element of resonance of the tap. There will be several tones. You need to focus on one element or frequency band heard. Remember, even force at an identical distance from the lug. Now adjust each lug so the pitch of the resonance is identical. The order is not very important here. DO NOT EVER TUNE DOWN TO A NOTE, TUNE UP. If a lug is too high detune below what you are trying to achieve and then bring it back up to pitch.

      9. To make sure the head is seated or crack the glue joint in the case of heads with glued collars, push down with light force making about a 1/2” (14mm) depression directly in the center of the head.


      10. With the drum off the floor or on its stand/mount we need to detention the head just to the point of no resonance and where the head buzzes. Loosen as you tightened with 1 or 2 keys in ¼ (90°) turn increments hitting the head between each turn of a lug. Now put 1/8th of a full turn on each and every lug and hit the head once between each hit until you get a distortion free and clear tone.

      11. Now as in Step 8, even out each lug so they are all the same pitch.

      12. Turn the drum over and place the batter side on and place the drum batter side up on a carpet or absorbent surface.

      Repeat the above Steps 4-11 on the batter side using the head of your choice. Once complete, proceed to the section Fine Tuning
      Prof.Sound is the Author of the Drum Tuning Bible available at no charge to forum readers here.

      Version 3 PDF Download now available for download!

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      • #18
        The practice of "seating" is an archaic throw-back to the days of calfskin, and totally unnecessary with modern plastic heads. Pop the head on there...tighten 'er up. If it's a new head, go a bit higher than normal, allowing both the plastic to stretch slightly and the collar to relax. There's no need in over doing it. High tension, standing on your heads, hairdryers...all that crap is a waste of time, and can actually do more harm than good. If the head's used, then just tune it up...any stretching or loosening of the collar has already happened.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Prof.Sound
          I think a fair amount.

          Is this the question you wanted answered?
          Nah i was only being a smarty pants, because you're professor sound and obviously know quite alot! but thankyou so much for answering the other question in such detail
          -Sim
          Pearl Image Vault --> http://www.pearldrum.com/2005imageva...ault-combo.htm

          my mapex pro m: http://www.pearldrummersforum.com/sh...post1851675607

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          • #20
            You are more than welcome.
            Prof.Sound is the Author of the Drum Tuning Bible available at no charge to forum readers here.

            Version 3 PDF Download now available for download!

            Comment

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