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Marching Snare vs Pipe Band Snare

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  • Marching Snare vs Pipe Band Snare

    Can anyone lay out the differences/similarities for me?

  • #2
    The biggest difference is the sound. Pipe snares use a different set of snare cables over the normal marching snares, thus giving it a higher/poppier sound. Some pipe band snares often have a second set of snares running across the top head which makes it even louder and brighter.

    There's a video of Jim Kilpatrick (I think I got that right) on Pearl's marching page, he's a drummer from Scotland who has a small pipe band that was recently sponsored by Pearl. In the video he plays on one of Pearl's pipe band snares, you can really hear the sound quite well in his little video. The drums also look slightly different; mostly because of the strainer system..I don't know how to describe them, but the pipe band snares don't have the same lever system that regular snares use.

    Hopefully that helps
    Pearl Vision VBX | Yamaha/ Tama Snares | Meinl Cymbals | Evans Drumheads | Innovative Percussion/ Vater Drumsticks
    Yamaha MTS Snare| Innovative Percussion Sticks

    Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy drum gear and that's pretty much the same thing

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr. Intensity View Post
      The biggest difference is the sound. Pipe snares use a different set of snare cables over the normal marching snares, thus giving it a higher/poppier sound. Some pipe band snares often have a second set of snares running across the top head which makes it even louder and brighter.

      There's a video of Jim Kilpatrick (I think I got that right) on Pearl's marching page, he's a drummer from Scotland who has a small pipe band that was recently sponsored by Pearl. In the video he plays on one of Pearl's pipe band snares, you can really hear the sound quite well in his little video. The drums also look slightly different; mostly because of the strainer system..I don't know how to describe them, but the pipe band snares don't have the same lever system that regular snares use.

      Hopefully that helps
      Connor MacLeod, Duncan MacLeod, and William Wallace are also famous Pipe snare players.
      sigpic

      It's important to play the spaces. Silence can speak so loudly.
      Carter Beauford, modern drummer september 1997
      Originally posted by MisterMixelpix
      Yeah I gotta admit she managed to tune her cymbals pretty well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mr. Intensity View Post
        The biggest difference is the sound. Pipe snares use a different set of snare cables over the normal marching snares, thus giving it a higher/poppier sound. Some pipe band snares often have a second set of snares running across the top head which makes it even louder and brighter.

        There's a video of Jim Kilpatrick (I think I got that right) on Pearl's marching page, he's a drummer from Scotland who has a small pipe band that was recently sponsored by Pearl. In the video he plays on one of Pearl's pipe band snares, you can really hear the sound quite well in his little video. The drums also look slightly different; mostly because of the strainer system..I don't know how to describe them, but the pipe band snares don't have the same lever system that regular snares use.

        Hopefully that helps
        Yeah, saw the video. I've seen a lot of universities use the second set of snares under the batter head too though. I think I'm going to stick with my Pearl FFX, but there is a cheap Pipe snare on the Bsite I was lookin' at. Thanks for the info nevertheless.

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        • #5
          snares

          Pipe snare drums sometimes carry an internal snare set up that gives the drum more snare sounds to the ear than a normal marching snare like the pearl ffx.The pipe when tuned is not as loud as a normal marching snare drum.I have played a premier royal scot snare drum before with an internal snare it sound nice but my pearl ffx snare will outshine that any day with pitch and rimshots.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ricky trooper View Post
            Pipe snare drums sometimes carry an internal snare set up that gives the drum more snare sounds to the ear than a normal marching snare like the pearl ffx.The pipe when tuned is not as loud as a normal marching snare drum.I have played a premier royal scot snare drum before with an internal snare it sound nice but my pearl ffx snare will outshine that any day with pitch and rimshots.
            actually a true pipe snare always has a top snare unit, usually made out of 20 or so coiled steel snares.. the top snare is always on, the only time its disengaged is to changed batter heads..

            the second difference is the bottoms snares are usually coil or steel cable depending on what the group prefers.. either way the bottom snares do not have a throw off.. they stay on unless the head is changed..


            third, is the heads used in pipe snares are ultra high torque. We all think the typical heads we use (white/black max, Evan's hybrids) are torqued. pipe snares use Kevlar style heads that are cranked to the max.

            the over all snare sound(if tuned properly) will have a tighter snare sound. lots of snare, but a dry sound..

            I think thats about it.

            If you are looking for a corps sound, a pipe snare is not what you are looking for.. stick with the ffx

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            • #7
              Which one projects more(loudest)?

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              • #8
                The Yamaha SFZ I believe.
                My Rogers Kit:

                http://www.pearldrummersforum.com/sh...post1853930745

                My Tama Kit:

                http://www.pearldrummersforum.com/sh...post1852531309

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