PDA

View Full Version : Memory Clamps?



NewPearlMan1
02-24-2003, 08:58 AM
This is a dumb question for someone who has been playing as long as I have, but I have never been a touring professional, and can count on two hands the number of times I have torn down/reset up my drum kit over the last 14 years.

What exactly is the purpose of memory clamps? In terms of what they do when the drums are set up, I understand. They prevent slippage. But I don't get the "memory" part, because cymbal stands and hardware with a memory clamp to remember how the stands were setup can't be collapsed for travel if there is a memory clamp in place, it would have to actually be taken apart into component pieces to be transported.

So do pros dismantle their hardware when it is transported, so the memory clamps are still in place? I am used to collapsing my hardware for travel, and thus the memory clamps are not used to "remember" how my kit was setup. And of course the big pain about that, is setting up my kit the same way twice.

So how do you touring people and pros use memory clamps, and how do you tear down your kits with them all over your hardware?

DED
02-24-2003, 10:12 AM
Memory clamps or memory locks are almost mandatory if you are setting up and tearing down every night or if you have someone else dealing with your gear.

With all the stand heights and positions pre-set you can duplicate your set up quickly and easily night after night. And if you're really thorough you can spike, or mark, the position of the stand legs on your rug and even your girlfriend can set up your kit!

The downside is that, yes, you do have to disassemble the hardware for transport and you'll need a larger case to accomodate all the pieces. And if you like to change your set up a lot you need to undo the clamps everytime you decide to lower a snare drum or adjust a boom arm.

I think it's worth it though. . .it speeds up my set up time quite a bit.

NewPearlMan1
02-24-2003, 10:46 AM
Thanks DED,

Yeah, I can really see how memory clamps can help you set up the drums consistantly in the same setup over and over again. Even though my drums stay put, they do help me when I need to change heads or clean drums and put the piece right back without repositioning it.

Since you tear down each piece of hardware to accomodate the clamps, I could see myself having to label every seperate part of each piece of hardware to make sure it goes where is needs to go. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I just imagine myself holding the middle extension of a boom stand and saying "OK, where the hell did THIS go?"

Funny you mention your girlfriend setting up your kit. My first gig I tried to get my girlfriend (now wife) to help me. But I didn't train her very well and it was a mess. I don't think twice when I handle my hardware and take down/put up. I forget that drums are mostly completely foreign concepts to those unfamiliar with them. So much easier to say "take the guitar out of the case and hand it to me" rather than "set up my drums over there, please"!

doc_on_drums
02-26-2003, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by NewPearlMan1
Thanks DED,


Since you tear down each piece of hardware to accomodate the clamps, I could see myself having to label every seperate part of each piece of hardware to make sure it goes where is needs to go. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I just imagine myself holding the middle extension of a boom stand and saying "OK, where the hell did THIS go?"


I get around this problem by setting the legs and the center section of every stand the same, the only variable from stand to stand is the top section and boom position. The stands that go to the left of the kit I put the boom arm to the left of the stand, stands on the right.... you get the picture. When I get it all set up I know at a glance if any stands are in the wrong place before I put the cymbals on.

brandrum
02-26-2003, 06:23 PM
a cheaper way would be to just mark your hardware with a marker or whatever and acheive the same effect.

SLIPKNOT1
02-26-2003, 06:45 PM
Originally posted by brandrum
a cheaper way would be to just mark your hardware with a marker or whatever and acheive the same effect.

Yeah, but with memory locks, you just drop all the arms into the holders. and they stop automatically and becuase they index, it will be at the correct angle also. You dont even have to look for a mark and they also act as a back up to eliminate any chance of slipping. I got enough memory locks to do all my cymbal booms for $20.00. Well worth it and alot easier to use and more reliable then Magic marker.

NewPearlMan1
02-27-2003, 07:53 AM
Another thing too about memory clamps: Pearl has them on the boom arm itself. And so if you left the memory clamp in place on teardown, and you didn't want to mess up the boom tilter angle to straighten out the stand for storage, you would need to remove the black cap at the end of the boom and slide the boom out to collapse the boom and stow it. Is this how you touring guys do it?

I like the idea doc had about keeping everything consistant up to the boom, and having the keyway set so that booms point left or right. But what if you have multiple booms on the right side and left side, how would you keep that straight?

I think the marker idea is the way to go. Not to replace the memory clamps, but to number the pieces with a marker and assemble it like a puzzle.

I'm beating this topic to death, but it's interesting since I never have been on a tour or anything or worked with a touring band.

SLIPKNOT1
02-27-2003, 07:59 AM
The most popular memory locks you will find for tubes are from Gibraltar www.gibraltarhardware.com They make them in diameters to fit every brand and size of tube. They also have an index notch to orient them in the right direction. A small piece of gaffers tape is usually used and then a number drawn on with a sharpie. The reason for this is permanent marker usually wears off chrome.

doc_on_drums
02-27-2003, 11:11 AM
Originally posted by NewPearlMan1


I like the idea doc had about keeping everything consistant up to the boom, and having the keyway set so that booms point left or right. But what if you have multiple booms on the right side and left side, how would you keep that straight?

I think the marker idea is the way to go. Not to replace the memory clamps, but to number the pieces with a marker and assemble it like a puzzle.


I do have multiple stands on both sides of my kit (7 cymbals + chimes on a boom stand) this hasn't been a problem for me where as I arrange my cymbals in an arch arrangement over the kit. just put it all together to form the arch and done. If this would be a problem for your cymbal array, you might try using wiring number stickers that electricians use. wrap one around the post just under the cymbal indicating it's size, nobody else will see it but you during setup.
As for the "marker" idea, I've tried that, if you clean your hardware regularly you find permanent marker isn't permanent.

dblbassmassacre
02-27-2003, 01:56 PM
i think that tear down and set up will always be a pain for any drummer playing anything...

weps
03-06-2003, 12:36 PM
IF you have plenty of room in your hardware case, by all means get memory clamps for every movable joint and then yank everything apart each time. It takes hardly any more time for reassembly than extending collapsed stands.

Never had the space myself. I took advantage of all the various colors of fingernail polish my wife has. I just put a thin line across each joint and collapse my stands. Still pretty easy to extend them correctly, the polish holds up well, yet easy to remove if changes are desired. You can actually color code various identical stands. I did this on floor tom legs also.

Just like repetitive movement makes a factory go faster, it can speed you up with setup and teardown.

new pearl man and doc on drums use the same method I used to when I used a lot of stands (now racked up). Make each multiple matching part the same, as much as possible. Each tripod leg spread, middle tube height, and even the upper tube on straight stands when possible. With floor toms, having all MARKED matching leg heights OR 2 matching height tall legs & one short one speeds things up, too.

Once you start gigging a lot, you will find standardization is your friend ;>). Pull ALL the hardware out and place it in a row before assembling stands. Then it's quick to match pieces together. Do the same with teardown. Makes it easier to load the hardware case, especially fitting in the big stuff. Get a rug and MARK (with duct tape allowing for changes) each tripod foot, floor tom leg, and bass spur position, too.

All the marking AND similar arranged stands means FAR less picking up and setting down of pieces you don't need yet (BIG waste of time) and with everything laid out, less walking back and forth to the hardware case or trying to drag something out from the bottom underneath things.

One last suggestion. Get a tall hardware case. I got a cheap golf bag Travel Case. I was able to fit most stands into it with the middle stand tube left in place and just collapsed the tops and/or pulled the booms. Snare stands only needed the tripod legs and baskets collapsed. All that loosening, pulling the tube, tightening actions add up, on both ends of the gig ;>)

weps

mati32
03-08-2003, 02:37 AM
Saw a DW 9000 series stand that has memory clamps on every joint, and it also comes with a piece of number stickers, so you can take everything apart for transport and put them back together without the guess work.

The memory clamp on Pearl's boom stands have a notch in it, so the distance and tilt angle are both fixed for re-assembling.

RedHotMuDMath
03-08-2003, 08:54 PM
I never took advantage of using memory clamps when I had stands (took too much time in opinion), but now that I have my rack, I swear by them, I can have my kit set up and ready to play in a matter of minutes, my record is 8 minutes from cases to playing! But I was rushing like hell that time, I usually set them up in about 12-15 minutes. But yes, memory clamps help a lot!

Full Collapse
03-08-2003, 11:18 PM
I'm not sure if I have them because I don't know how to use them or what they look like. I have DW stands so I'm guessing I have them.

Eight Minutes?! Where do you play that you have 8 minutes to set up?

SLIPKNOT1
03-08-2003, 11:43 PM
Originally posted by Full Collapse
I'm not sure if I have them because I don't know how to use them or what they look like. I have DW stands so I'm guessing I have them.


Yes, DW stands have Memory locks. They are the secondary clamps above the main wing nut clamps.

RedHotMuDMath
03-09-2003, 09:46 AM
Full Collapse, that's what happens when you get bored when you get your drums back at your house the next day after a gig. I just felt like seeing how fast I could set my drums back up in my practice room, that's all :D