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View Full Version : pearl demon drive VS. tama iron cobra



heath
06-05-2010, 07:20 PM
which one is the best?

thismercifulfate
06-05-2010, 07:34 PM
Chocolate or vanilla, which one is the best?

SLIPKNOT1
06-05-2010, 07:35 PM
Your comparing two completley different types of pedals. Direct drive and Chain/Belt drive. There is no "Best" out of those two. Your comparing apples to oranges.

What kind of music are you playing and how long have you been playing? A direct drive pedals fills a void where people want a very solid feeling pedal with no softness or lag at all. Other people actually prefer the give that a chain or strap gives. But a pedal will only give you as much speed as you are physically capable of producing. There are VERY few people who can play at speeds so fast that their pedal is actually slowing them down.

I will tell you the same advice i tell anyone who is looking at pedals. To try out as many brands and models as you can. Even if that means a long drive. You need to know what you are getting into. And with direct drive, that is even more important. Direct drive pedals are VERY expensive and it is silly to buy one without trying one. Esepcially for the wrong reasons. Buying a top end direct drive pedal like the Demon Drive because you think it will make you play at blinding speeds is silly. Unless you have that money to literally throw away, i would advise against buying a direct drive unless you truly are not happy with ANY chain or strap drive pedal. The Iron Cobra and Pearl Eliminator series pedals are in my opinion the two finest non direct drive pedals on the market. Either one would work fine for most any persons playing style. If i was going to buy a direct drive pedal? I would buy a Demon Drive. I already have one and love it. But i still love my IC's and Eliminators too. They are all very different types of pedals but none is "better" then the other.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but typically when someone asks a question like you have, it means they know very little about drum hardware and possibly, drumming in general. Are you new to drumming? How long and how often do you play? What kind of kit are you playing? I ask this because spending upwards of $500.00 on a pro grade double pedal is a bit silly if your playing on a $200.00 drum kit a few hours a week.

drummermuz
06-05-2010, 08:21 PM
Chocolate or vanilla, which one is the best?

caramel.

for topic, what Slipknot1 said. he's pretty much Yoda

drummer111
06-05-2010, 08:25 PM
caramel.

for topic, what Slipknot1 said. he's pretty much Yoda

exactly

HOTFOOT
06-05-2010, 08:32 PM
This is a more close comparison.
Iron Cobra VS Powershifter Eliminator

WINNER: Powershifter Eliminator.

audiotech
06-05-2010, 10:21 PM
And possibly the Demon Drives could be more fairly compared to the Trick Pro 1 V or Axis pedals. My choice between those three was the Trick Pro 1 V in a single pedal.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n44/F-64/DSC_0186.jpg

My doubles happen to be the Tama Iron Cobra Power Glides.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n44/F-64/DSC_0386.jpg

No one can give you an accurate evaluation on how any pedal will react with your feet. You really have to get to some well stocked drum store and check out a bunch. It took me about two months before I made my mind up concerning the Trick pedal. My main criteria was smoothness, easy adjustability so I wouldn't have to be crawling all over the floor for a simple tension adjustment, and also absolute quietness from the pedals mechanics. Many times I mic my bass drum from both the resonant head and the batter head just next to where the beater meets the head.

Dennis

GTHO_PhaseIII
06-05-2010, 10:34 PM
This is a more close comparison.
Iron Cobra VS Powershifter Eliminator

WINNER: Powershifter Eliminator.

Except you couldn't be more wrong. There will never be a universal "god" pedal, because everyone has different feet and is after different feels that can only be produced by certain pedals. I can't stand the feel of DW9000's, but I know people that swear by them. I'm an Axis player, but between the IC and Eliminators, I prefer the Iron Cobras. Does that mean either one of us is wrong for choosing the different pedal? Of course not.

jondrumming
06-06-2010, 07:39 AM
Your comparing two completley different types of pedals. Direct drive and Chain/Belt drive. There is no "Best" out of those two. Your comparing apples to oranges.

What kind of music are you playing and how long have you been playing? A direct drive pedals fills a void where people want a very solid feeling pedal with no softness or lag at all. Other people actually prefer the give that a chain or strap gives. But a pedal will only give you as much speed as you are physically capable of producing. There are VERY few people who can play at speeds so fast that their pedal is actually slowing them down.

I will tell you the same advice i tell anyone who is looking at pedals. To try out as many brands and models as you can. Even if that means a long drive. You need to know what you are getting into. And with direct drive, that is even more important. Direct drive pedals are VERY expensive and it is silly to buy one without trying one. Esepcially for the wrong reasons. Buying a top end direct drive pedal like the Demon Drive because you think it will make you play at blinding speeds is silly. Unless you have that money to literally throw away, i would advise against buying a direct drive unless you truly are not happy with ANY chain or strap drive pedal. The Iron Cobra and Pearl Eliminator series pedals are in my opinion the two finest non direct drive pedals on the market. Either one would work fine for most any persons playing style. If i was going to buy a direct drive pedal? I would buy a Demon Drive. I already have one and love it. But i still love my IC's and Eliminators too. They are all very different types of pedals but none is "better" then the other.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but typically when someone asks a question like you have, it means they know very little about drum hardware and possibly, drumming in general. Are you new to drumming? How long and how often do you play? What kind of kit are you playing? I ask this because spending upwards of $500.00 on a pro grade double pedal is a bit silly if your playing on a $200.00 drum kit a few hours a week.

[/thread] .

SLIPKNOT1
06-06-2010, 11:40 AM
Except you couldn't be more wrong. There will never be a universal "god" pedal, because everyone has different feet and is after different feels that can only be produced by certain pedals. I can't stand the feel of DW9000's, but I know people that swear by them. I'm an Axis player, but between the IC and Eliminators, I prefer the Iron Cobras. Does that mean either one of us is wrong for choosing the different pedal? Of course not.


Good info.

Stranjluv101
06-06-2010, 12:41 PM
which one is the best?

I'd like to be the first to offer my opinions on those pedals, and not my opinions on your questioning. :D

I had the Iron Cobra Coil Dbl. pedals. They were great, and I think I liked them even more after I bought the springs that made them "coils". The springs made the pedals seem like they "stick" to the bottom of your feet, which I liked. The Tama beaters were lightweight (bonus),and the pedals worked great for what I needed them for at the time.

But, I got into playing some music that would require me to need a longboard pedal. (speed) I sold the IC pedals, and bought the Demons. So far the Demon Drive is just "OK" in my book. Although to be fair, I've owned it only about a month,and I haven't really had the time to spend to play with it to adjust it to my liking. I wear a size 11 (US) shoe, and I can tell you this, the longboard is hard to use with shoes on. I have to keep the toe of my shoe up in the direct drive, and even at that, the heal of my shoe is barely on the longboard still. So, if you need the DD pedal for the longpoard appeal, keep this in mind.

Honestly, if I had it to do over again, I'd probably go back to the IC Cobra Coil Dbl pedal.

I hope that helped!

Drobac
06-06-2010, 01:53 PM
I've switched from Iron Cobra double (which I used for 6 years and I also turned them into direct drives) to a Demon Drive double 2 months ago and there's no way I'm getting back to Iron Cobras. DDs are just better to my feet. They are far more adjustable than ICs, much lighter, smoother and faster in feel. Though, you should not confuse speed of the pedal with the speed with your feet. Buying faster pedal won't gain your feet extra 20 bpms, practice will. I'm still using Iron Cobra beaters with Demon Drives, cause I find them better than the original Demon Drive beaters. I also noticed that I have much more power with the DDs than ICs and I'm talking about the same amount of force being applied to the pedal. I still have ICs, but I will probably sell them, since I haven't even looked at them in these 2 months.

All this being said, Slip is right. There is no perfect pedal, or the best pedal. What feels best to mine feet, probably won't feel best to some other drummers feet, so the best advice would be to go and try as many pedals as you can and let your own feet decide which one is the best for you. ;)

Stranjluv101
06-06-2010, 03:29 PM
I'm still using Iron Cobra beaters with Demon Drives, cause I find them better than the original Demon Drive beaters.

I had thought about doing the same, and now I will!

I wonder why Pearl went with the big beaters anyway.

BabylonWillFall
06-07-2010, 12:37 AM
IMO, they're both ridiculously overrated. The Iron Cobras can't keep up with me and the DD just felt like a silly shortboard pedal with a bunch of bolt-ons to gimmick it into being a pedal worth paying attention to.

metalfish
06-08-2010, 03:32 PM
IMO, they're both ridiculously overrated. The Iron Cobras can't keep up with me and the DD just felt like a silly shortboard pedal with a bunch of bolt-ons to gimmick it into being a pedal worth paying attention to.

Yeah i'll second that, tried one out in comparison to the Trick Pro-V1 at my local store and it felt like the time i swapped the Agenda pedals i got with my ddrums kit with my new DW 7000 pedals haha.

Only advice I would give is don't bother with Mapex Janus pedals, Iron Cobras/Eliminators all depend on the genre you play/feel you like, but the Janus ones are just nasty.

SLIPKNOT1
06-08-2010, 03:49 PM
IMO, they're both ridiculously overrated. The Iron Cobras can't keep up with me

Sorry, but i'm calling BS on that. If anything, you don't have them set up properly to work with your playing style. There are plenty of people using IC's with no issue at all and well over 200bpm.

IC's have more adjustments then any other chain drive pedal. If they are not keeping up with you, you simply never set them up to work for you.

BabylonWillFall
06-08-2010, 03:54 PM
Sorry, but i'm calling BS on that. If anything, you don't have them set up properly to work with your playing style. There are plenty of people using IC's with no issue at all and well over 200bpm.

IC's have more adjustments then any other chain drive pedal. If they are not keeping up with you, you simply never set them up to work for you.

I played them for 8 months straight. I've owned my pair for about a year and a half now. The only way I can deal with the feel is if I put Axis springs on them.

Calling BS on me fine tuning my pedals is like calling BS on an ASE certified mechanic that you think can't change oil properly. I constantly tell people that speed, agility, and endurance can only be worked in ones own personal niche and using tons of good practice. I had those pedals as dialed in as I could get them and ended up buying DW7002's and liked them better until I upgraded to Axis.

It's probably a very personal thing with me but I know a few people who really hate the heavy feel of the IC's.

Understand the context though. I'm a metal drummer so I DO actually need my pedals to play at 200+ BPMs for over 30 seconds at a time and the IC just didn't have the fluidity I needed to endure that kind of bass pounding for that long.

Not trying to start an argument here but that's just how it is. I actually love Tama products but I just feel as if those pedals couldn't do it for me.

TalonTsi90
06-08-2010, 05:18 PM
Calling BS on me fine tuning my pedals is like calling BS on an ASE certified mechanic that you think can't change oil properly.

And certification makes one perfect? That statement makes you certified. As in looney ;)

And metal does not = fast music....

BabylonWillFall
06-08-2010, 06:08 PM
And certification makes one perfect? That statement makes you certified. As in looney ;)

And metal does not = fast music....

You must have been sheltered as a child and are probably something close to a hermit now.

TalonTsi90
06-08-2010, 06:49 PM
That just digs your hole deeper...

BabylonWillFall
06-08-2010, 07:26 PM
That just digs your hole deeper...

What hole? You're the one not assuming the obvious.

EricD
06-11-2010, 10:10 AM
Calling BS on me fine tuning my pedals is like calling BS on an ASE certified mechanic that you think can't change oil properly.

No, A professional drum tech fine tuning your pedal is like an ASE certified mechanic changing the oil in a car. Not an amateur.

TalonTsi90
06-11-2010, 05:23 PM
What hole? You're the one not assuming the obvious.

You cant assume the 'obvious' at any time because theres always some idiot standing there waiting to prove you wrong.

Once more, certification means NOTHING.

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 02:22 PM
No, A professional drum tech fine tuning your pedal is like an ASE certified mechanic changing the oil in a car. Not an amateur.

A professional drum tech has absolutely nothing to do with the way a drummer sets up his pedals.

SLIPKNOT1
06-12-2010, 03:45 PM
A professional drum tech has absolutely nothing to do with the way a drummer sets up his pedals.

In some situations, it does. I have set pedals up for people who had given up on or compromised their playing because they could not get comfortable with pedals. Many people do not even understand how or what to adjust on a pedal to get the feel they want. Having a pro set them up for them can make a world of difference. It's the same idea being many guitar players have their guitars Set Up by a pro. String height, fret profile and other variables are things that not everbody knows how to adjust or even what they do. Someone who deals with things on a regular basis as a full time job will typically know more about setting them up then an amateur.

EricD
06-12-2010, 04:16 PM
In some situations, it does. I have set pedals up for people who had given up on or compromised their playing because they could not get comfortable with pedals. Many people do not even understand how or what to adjust on a pedal to get the feel they want. Having a pro set them up for them can make a world of difference. It's the same idea being many guitar players have their guitars Set Up by a pro. String height, fret profile and other variables are things that not everbody knows how to adjust or even what they do. Someone who deals with things on a regular basis as a full time job will typically know more about setting them up then an amateur.

Glad YOU (of all people) agree with me! :D

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 04:17 PM
In some situations, it does. I have set pedals up for people who had given up on or compromised their playing because they could not get comfortable with pedals. Many people do not even understand how or what to adjust on a pedal to get the feel they want. Having a pro set them up for them can make a world of difference. It's the same idea being many guitar players have their guitars Set Up by a pro. String height, fret profile and other variables are things that not everbody knows how to adjust or even what they do. Someone who deals with things on a regular basis as a full time job will typically know more about setting them up then an amateur.

I like how I'm being called an amateur over and over here as if my playing ability and my ability to understand, adjust, fix, and set up gear is any lesser than anyone else. I've spent countless hours breaking down Iron Cobra and Axis pedals down to bare parts to be cleaned, fixed, and adjusted.

I do thorough examinations and make sure everything is constantly in tune with any hardware on my drumset. I'm not just some Joe who doesn't know what the **** he's talking about here. I've had enough experience in my 5 years with the latest and greatest bassdrum pedals the current market has to offer to make proper adjustments, set things up properly, and give a solid opinion on the gear in question.

If you've ever taken the bearings out of an Axis pedal, stripped it down to it's bare parts, and gone through them thoroughly, you would probably understand what I've gone through to understand the exact mechanics of the pedals. I'm not saying you haven't, just trying to give any relevance to any accreditation I would have in reviewing the pedals in question, the way I did.

EricD
06-12-2010, 04:21 PM
I like how I'm being called an amateur over and over here as if my playing ability and my ability to understand, adjust, fix, and set up gear is any lesser than anyone else. I've spent countless hours breaking down Iron Cobra and Axis pedals down to bare parts to be cleaned, fixed, and adjusted.

I do thorough examinations and make sure everything is constantly in tune with any hardware on my drumset. I'm not just some Joe who doesn't know what the **** he's talking about here. I've had enough experience in my 5 years with the latest and greatest bassdrum pedals the current market has to offer to make proper adjustments, set things up properly, and give a solid opinion on the gear in question.

If you've ever taken the bearings out of an Axis pedal, stripped it down to it's bare parts, and gone through them thoroughly, you would probably understand what I've gone through to understand the exact mechanics of the pedals. I'm not saying you haven't, just trying to give any relevance to any accreditation I would have in reviewing the pedals in question, the way I did.

Are you a professional drum tech? No? Then you're an amateur. Hey man, I also am an amateur. (LOOK AT THAT ALLITERATION!!)

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 04:43 PM
Are you a professional drum tech? No? Then you're an amateur. Hey man, I also am an amateur. (LOOK AT THAT ALLITERATION!!)

Cool story bro.

SLIPKNOT1
06-12-2010, 04:51 PM
I like how I'm being called an amateur over and over here as if my playing ability and my ability to understand, adjust, fix, and set up gear is any lesser than anyone else. I've spent countless hours breaking down Iron Cobra and Axis pedals down to bare parts to be cleaned, fixed, and adjusted.

I do thorough examinations and make sure everything is constantly in tune with any hardware on my drumset. I'm not just some Joe who doesn't know what the **** he's talking about here. I've had enough experience in my 5 years with the latest and greatest bassdrum pedals the current market has to offer to make proper adjustments, set things up properly, and give a solid opinion on the gear in question.

If you've ever taken the bearings out of an Axis pedal, stripped it down to it's bare parts, and gone through them thoroughly, you would probably understand what I've gone through to understand the exact mechanics of the pedals. I'm not saying you haven't, just trying to give any relevance to any accreditation I would have in reviewing the pedals in question, the way I did.


You just need to relax. The term "Amateur drummer" does not imply that you do not know what you are doing and just picked up sticks for the first time.

Amateur implies you do not make your living as a drummer. Drumming is NOT your full time job. Drumming is something you do for fun on the side or maybe you gig with some buddies a few times a month. Your an amateur. Just because you play in a band does not make you a pro drummer. And just because you play in a band for 20 years at bars on weekends does not make you a pro. Someone who tours for 6 months straight at times, is in a band with an album(s) on a real label, has endorsement deals, etc are all things that seperate a Pro from an Amateur. And being a Pro drummer does not in any way mean you are an expert at everthing their is to know about drums either. Their are many pro's who know the bare minimum to get by. And their are amaterurs who know more then some pro's. It's not a question of skill, it's a question of your title.

Do not not look into the word "Amateur" as meaning you lack the skills to make you any sort of expert.

My comment about being a professional drum tech relates to skill level. You admit you have been playing drums for 5 years. I teched on a professional level for over 5 years and have been playing drums for close to 20. I have owned half a dozen kits, been a drum department manager at 2 different GC's and worked in the music industry for almost a decade. My level of teching skills is at a professional level. Yours is at an Amateur level. That is NOT an insult, it's simply a fact.

I do not have a college degree, but i don't get offended if someone points that out to me. And you should not be offended because i mention that your an amatuer drummer. It's not an insult.

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 04:54 PM
So, what about the pedals?

EricD
06-12-2010, 05:38 PM
You just need to relax. The term "Amateur drummer" does not imply that you do not know what you are doing and just picked up sticks for the first time.

Amateur implies you do not make your living as a drummer. Drumming is NOT your full time job. Drumming is something you do for fun on the side or maybe you gig with some buddies a few times a month. Your an amateur. Just because you play in a band does not make you a pro drummer. And just because you play in a band for 20 years at bars on weekends does not make you a pro. Someone who tours for 6 months straight at times, is in a band with an album(s) on a real label, has endorsement deals, etc are all things that seperate a Pro from an Amateur. And being a Pro drummer does not in any way mean you are an expert at everthing their is to know about drums either. Their are many pro's who know the bare minimum to get by. And their are amaterurs who know more then some pro's. It's not a question of skill, it's a question of your title.

Do not not look into the word "Amateur" as meaning you lack the skills to make you any sort of expert.

My comment about being a professional drum tech relates to skill level. You admit you have been playing drums for 5 years. I teched on a professional level for over 5 years and have been playing drums for close to 20. I have owned half a dozen kits, been a drum department manager at 2 different GC's and worked in the music industry for almost a decade. My level of teching skills is at a professional level. Yours is at an Amateur level. That is NOT an insult, it's simply a fact.

I do not have a college degree, but i don't get offended if someone points that out to me. And you should not be offended because i mention that your an amatuer drummer. It's not an insult.

PWNED!! LOL. :p

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 07:18 PM
PWNED!! LOL. :p

Not really. I very clearly stated that I'm not the average amateur. At any rate, it's still not the deciding point of this argument.

EricD
06-12-2010, 07:28 PM
Not really. I very clearly stated that I'm not the average amateur. At any rate, it's still not the deciding point of this argument.

The arguement of the pedals? It depends onif you like the feel of chain drive or direct drive. There is no "best" pedal. It's what your feet like.

SLIPKNOT1
06-12-2010, 07:31 PM
Not really. I very clearly stated that I'm not the average amateur. At any rate, it's still not the deciding point of this argument.

A person who picks up sticks for the first time is a Beginner, when you know what you are doing, your a drummer. But untill you are making your living or a substaintial portion of your income by drumming in the studio or at live gigs, clinics, etc, you are an amateur. It makes no difference if your great at dismantaling pedals or building your own drum shells, your still an amateur.

Once again, your taking the title of Amateur to be some sort of insult, it's not. I own two Telescopes, high end models and love astronomy. But i am not a professional Astronomer. I have been shooting for decades and am a better shot then some guys i know who shoot competiveley. But i am still an amateur shooter.

If i pay 10 grand and go to flight school, then buy my own plane and fly it every weekend all over the country as a hobby, i will be nothing more then an Amateur pilot. Even 30 years from now ill still be an amateur. Being a great pilot and buying your own plane does not make you a professional pilot.

I am a Professional Locomotive Engineer. I have done it as a career for almost 10 years now total. It is what i do for a living. You could pay $22,000 and go to a school for it and do it as a hobby and you will be an Amateur Locomotive Engineer. Even if you did a better job of running a train then i did.

BabylonWillFall
06-12-2010, 07:56 PM
It makes no difference if your great at dismantaling pedals or building your own drum shells, your still an amateur.

Okay, I got it. My opinion is completely ****ing useless because of my credentials. Good deal:rolleyes:

EricD
06-12-2010, 11:17 PM
Okay, I got it. My opinion is completely ****ing useless because of my credentials. Good deal:rolleyes:

Wow. I still can't believe how you take it. :confused: 00**

SLIPKNOT1
06-13-2010, 09:35 AM
Okay, I got it. My opinion is completely ****ing useless because of my credentials. Good deal:rolleyes:

Do you not understand english? Who said your opinion is useless? I cannot speak for others, but i was simply pointing out that playing drums for 5 years and having taken a few pedals apart does not make you any sort of expert on all things pedals. But your attitude is hurting your credibility because you seem unable to deal with any sort of criticism.

You don't like the Iron Cobras pedals, fine, we get it. You stated your opinion and we heard it. My opinion differers from yours. Deal with it.:rolleyes:

BabylonWillFall
06-13-2010, 10:26 AM
Do you not understand english? Who said your opinion is useless? I cannot speak for others, but i was simply pointing out that playing drums for 5 years and having taken a few pedals apart does not make you any sort of expert on all things pedals. But your attitude is hurting your credibility because you seem unable to deal with any sort of criticism.

You don't like the Iron Cobras pedals, fine, we get it. You stated your opinion and we heard it. My opinion differers from yours. Deal with it.:rolleyes:

Good deal.

I kept posting because I wanted to see just how far you'd go with that high horse you're on.

Good lols :D

EricD
06-13-2010, 10:36 AM
Good deal.

I kept posting because I wanted to see just how far you'd go with that high horse you're on.

Good lols :D

Wow. You really don't get it. That's giving me good lols.

BabylonWillFall
06-13-2010, 11:43 AM
Wow. You really don't get it. That's giving me good lols.

You're the one who didn't get it in the first place.

You don't need to be ASE certified to change oil and you don't need credentials to observe and report on drum gear. Pedals are ridiculously simple in their mechanical aspect.

SLIPKNOT1
06-13-2010, 11:51 AM
This thread has run it's course.