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View Full Version : Porting a large hole.



danvranic
05-29-2010, 06:37 PM
Hey guys, As some of you know, Im new, and just asking alot of questions on how to do things, and info and reviews on products.

Well now, i have a question, How do you port a bass drum with a hole that is 7-9 inches? I know the can method, but for a larger drum, how would that work?

Thanks for the help?

|DxM| Malice
05-29-2010, 07:07 PM
I believe porting over 7" inches would be the equivalent of having no resonant head at all.

danvranic
05-29-2010, 07:19 PM
I know, and i want that. However, I think the look of no reso head is unprofessional. So i would like to know how to port on that big.

audiotech
05-29-2010, 07:19 PM
I believe porting over 7" inches would be the equivalent of having no resonant head at all.

He's correct. Just take the resonant head off if you need a port of that size.

Dennis

ludwigdrums
05-29-2010, 07:29 PM
if you want to do this at home you can get a can or tin whatever size you want, heat it up then press it on your head, that's how i did my porthole and it works perfect

|DxM| Malice
05-29-2010, 07:31 PM
I know, and i want that. However, I think the look of no reso head is unprofessional. So i would like to know how to port on that big.

You can take a thin cooking pan, you know those cheap ones? get one of those in the size you want heat it up like the tin and do the same thing. It will work the same.

SLIPKNOT1
05-29-2010, 07:34 PM
He's correct. Just take the resonant head off if you need a port of that size.

Dennis

Bad idea. Now you have your bearing edge exposed to all sorts of damage and no way to mount the front hoop.

If you want the look of an unported head but want the sound of no head at all, buy a mesh front head. Or, if you don't mind the large port, it's an easy fix.

Take the front head off and lay it face down (Logo side down) on some layers of newspaper. Then, find a solid round object as big as the hole you want to make. Records work great, tupperwars lids, pot/pan lids, etc. Just search around for a metal or plastic round object. Then measure to center it on the inside of the reso head (logo still laying face down). Then using a sharp single edge razor or Xacto knife, cut around your solid round cutting guide. Take your time and make sure you keep the blade tight against the cutting guide so you make a nice clean hole. Then your done.

Not hard to do and will look fine.

danvranic
05-29-2010, 09:45 PM
Yea, I like the sound of the no reso ones. But i really dont like the look of unported or mesh heads, thats why i wanted a large hole, not just because it looks awesome, but because it will fit my needs :)

thank you very much Slip and others !

|DxM| Malice
05-29-2010, 10:00 PM
What if you made multiple port wholes? like in a triangle design like these faces

.......... ................. :) .........................

................. :) ........ ,,,,,, :),,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

audiotech
05-29-2010, 10:07 PM
Bad idea. Now you have your bearing edge exposed to all sorts of damage and no way to mount the front hoop.



I was making a point and no where did I say to keep the head off the drum. It's not a bad idea if you're careful and don't have the bearing edge exposed while transporting, unless the drums are new and packed headless in their boxes of course. Over the years I've literally recorded hundreds of drummers without the resonant head attached to their drums during the sessions and I have done the same exact thing using our studio kits, sometimes leaving the front head off the drum between sessions. Every time someone does a head change the bearing edges are exposed. This doesn't mean they should stand on the exposed shell's edge or toss it around the room, lol.

During the next session when where not using the reso head on the bass drum, I'll try to remember to take some photographs for the faint of hearts. ;)

Dennis

danvranic
05-29-2010, 10:21 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmN2_-JYf5o&feature=related

go to around :50. and there u see what im going for, the white reso with 7" hole in center.
Lars Ulrich's kit from around 1996-1999 is similar to what im getting in terms of specs and sizes (I cant afford a SCM!) Only mine will be in Wine Red Sparkle.
CANT WAIT!! (need a job)!

p.s notice lars is using the famous Tama Bell Brass :D

|DxM| Malice
05-29-2010, 10:27 PM
I still think you should do what I said in my post, it will look cleaner then just a big hole.

danvranic
05-29-2010, 10:32 PM
I still think you should do what I said in my post, it will look cleaner then just a big hole.

the triangle?
thanks but no thanks, that's not my style

audiotech
05-29-2010, 10:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmN2_-JYf5o&feature=related

go to around :50. and there u see what im going for, the white reso with 7" hole in center.
Lars Ulrich's kit from around 1996-1999 is similar to what im getting in terms of specs and sizes (I cant afford a SCM!) Only mine will be in Wine Red Sparkle.
CANT WAIT!! (need a job)!

p.s notice lars is using the famous Tama Bell Brass :D

The thing is, not only does it alter the sound of the bass drum, but it also affects the response of your pedal. This is more so with the hugh port hole center of the head as in the video. If you don't like the results, you would only have to replace the resonant head.

Dennis

|DxM| Malice
05-29-2010, 10:35 PM
Yeah it will take most of your rebound away, you'll have really bad projection as well. You'll need it to be mic'd up at shows. To each his own.

danvranic
05-29-2010, 10:38 PM
The thing is, not only does it alter the sound of the bass drum, but it also affects the response of your pedal. This is more so with the hugh port hole center of the head as in the video. If you don't like the results, you would only have to replace the resonant head.

Dennis

thats good, but i want to be a dynamic and versatile drummer so i would live with it, and learn how to deal with it and become better.
but of course, it probably wouldnt be too much to pay another 20 bucks to get some new resos :)

thanks

danvranic
05-29-2010, 11:38 PM
btw, what would an offset 4.75 hole do?

drumtechdad
05-30-2010, 05:59 AM
btw, what would an offset 4.75 hole do?

The larger the hole, and the more centrally located it is, the more effect it has: less rebound, less volume, less tone. Smaller, offset ports have less of these effects.

I use 4" holes off-center at about 4 o'clock, ca. 3" in from the edge of the head. I use 4" so I can use the Holz protectors--a good investment to prevent the head tearing if a mic is removed from the drum carelessly. (BD heads are expensive.)

An earlier poster made a point that needs reiterating: with no reso (or a reso with a big central hole or a mesh head) you will absolutely need the drum to be miked when you play out. It will be very soft, all but inaudible unless you're playing quiet music.

For that reason I use an unported head for unmiked playing--you need sustain for the drum to be heard. I keep the offset-ported head for miking.

SLIPKNOT1
05-30-2010, 07:29 AM
I was making a point and no where did I say to keep the head off the drum. It's not a bad idea if you're careful and don't have the bearing edge exposed while transporting, unless the drums are new and packed headless in their boxes of course. Over the years I've literally recorded hundreds of drummers without the resonant head attached to their drums during the sessions and I have done the same exact thing using our studio kits, sometimes leaving the front head off the drum between sessions. Every time someone does a head change the bearing edges are exposed. This doesn't mean they should stand on the exposed shell's edge or toss it around the room, lol.

I am well aware of having no reso head in the studio, that is very common. And in the studio where a drum kit will not be moved and will likley not be knocked into, then having no front head is an option. But the thread starter did not specifically mention being in the studio. So i am going to take that to mean he is talking about having this sound all the time. With that in mind, no, there should ALWAYS be a front head of some kind in place to allow the front hoop to be mounted to protect the bearing edge. Any time that front head is off, your bearing edge is at risk for damage. Even in a studio, all it takes is a careless tech, engineer or band member to bang into it with a guitar, mic, mic stand, etc and you will cause major damage. That is why the head should only be removed in special situations.

audiotech
05-30-2010, 09:20 AM
I am well aware of having no reso head in the studio, that is very common. And in the studio where a drum kit will not be moved and will likley not be knocked into, then having no front head is an option. But the thread starter did not specifically mention being in the studio. So i am going to take that to mean he is talking about having this sound all the time. With that in mind, no, there should ALWAYS be a front head of some kind in place to allow the front hoop to be mounted to protect the bearing edge. Any time that front head is off, your bearing edge is at risk for damage. Even in a studio, all it takes is a careless tech, engineer or band member to bang into it with a guitar, mic, mic stand, etc and you will cause major damage. That is why the head should only be removed in special situations.

What you're saying is Sheet happens and I agree. I've seen many many mishaps with equipment live and in the studio where the person would have given anything to relive that second in time and be more careful. I can probably count on one finger anything ever happening to the bearing edge of a bass drum from careless activity, but I can recite dozens of times where microphone booms came crashing down on a kit or the head of an amp decided to jump to the floor of a stage or a drummers throne toppled sending his floor tom six feet below. One of my most horrific experiences was when a 2K Fresnel let loose breaking its safety cable plummeting down into a drummers kit, he didn't get hurt and luckily neither did his bass's exposed bearing edge.

Dennis