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  1. Registered User

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    Default Whats the best darbuka/doumbek you can get?

    Not in terms of looks but playability.

    I think alexandra(or something like that) makes an 8 lug one thats supposed to be pretty good.

    Thanks
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  2. Registered User

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scolecite
    Not in terms of looks but playability.

    I think alexandra(or something like that) makes an 8 lug one thats supposed to be pretty good.

    Thanks
    EDIT: http://larkinthemorning.com/product....ith+case%29_E_

    WHEW! I think I found one. But this one only has 6 bolts. I know the best ones come with 8 bolts.
    I hope there is a Doumbek EXPERT in this forum to assist me.
    Mapex Orion Orbiter Tobacco Fade
    22x18, 10x7, 12x8, 14x14, 16x15
    also
    Yamaha DTXPress II
    Sonor Force 2001

    My Orion Orbiter(Pro-M)

    A Mollusk Secretion, The Best Reason To Play Drums.

  3. Registered User

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    Default

    nevermind I got a Turkish aluminum one with copper ingraving and a mylar head. Supposed to be 'the best' you can get. Not as high sounding (tek)as the alexandra but better bass sound(dum).
    Mapex Orion Orbiter Tobacco Fade
    22x18, 10x7, 12x8, 14x14, 16x15
    also
    Yamaha DTXPress II
    Sonor Force 2001

    My Orion Orbiter(Pro-M)

    A Mollusk Secretion, The Best Reason To Play Drums.

  4. Gerry Zaragemca

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    Default

    Greeting,the best one supose to be made out of ceramic,or metals,but beside the shells there are several features which putting it together, would give quality to the instruments,(skin,configuration,the rod tuning system,the thickness of the shells,etc).Gerry Zaragemca
    International Club of Percussionists

  5. Ver-ry Bad Man!

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    Default

    I actually own several. Each one of them has a very different sound and feel, and I use them for different applications...or moods.

    Firstly, the original "dumbek" is a ceramic drum, usually made of terracotta, with a very thin fish skin stretched over it. There are also wooden models with goatskin heads. These are the truly traditional dumbeks, and they come in many variations of shape depending on the culture from which they come.

    In modern times, metals have been employed in the making of dumbeks, and they most often have mylar heads. There are ceramic models with mylar heads and goatskin heads as well. All have their use and merit in different ways. Here is everything I know...from reading...and from experience. I hope this answers all the questions:

    The Turkish and Egyptian "professional" models (Istanbul, Alexandria, etc) are very finger-sensitive. That is to say, they are very good for advanced fingerwork where subtle differences in velocity bring out more tonal seperation. They have very little sustain, so trills and finger rolls are very pronounced on these drums. Plus they have serious projection abilities due to their brighter sound from having been made of metal. This makes them ideal for stage use, which is why most of the professional musicians use them on tours and in the studio. Plus their tunability and head replacement possibility adds to their value. They also have the benefit of being metal and mylar which makes them fairly indestructable. Again, an added benefit for the touring musician...or the guy who doesn't want his drum being ruined by the all-too-often approach of idiots who pick up the drum and pound on it.

    The downside of the Turkish and Egypian drums: Weak bass sounds (dom/dum) and very little sustain. This makes them a little bit difficult for the beginner, especially during slower or more atmospheric passages where the sustain helps carry the tempo and the feel. I've found that the Egyptian drums are a bit easier to play than the Turkish ones, but that could just be a preference. The Turkish ones are much thinner and lighter in weight.


    Now we have the Remo doumbeks. These aren't bad at all considering they look like toys. (When is Remo going to start putting more professional looking finishes on their drums??) They have a feel similar to a traditional wooden dumbek, and come with a fairly good head that is either pretuned or tunable. (I own the pretuned Diana model.) Remo has even been sure to offer some different shapes. These drums are good beginner drums because they are easy to play and they don't require a great deal of articulative skill to make a decent sound. They have nice, full and deep bass tones and somewhat rounded, almost muted treble tones. So on the good side, you'll have a decent, lightweight drum that can withstand abuse, make good sound, and not require heavy skills to play. Plus they're great for the slower, more atmospheric passages because their sustain is long and smooth. They're great in studio applications too, due to their even tones.

    But on the downside, the Remo drums don't respond to fingerwork as well as most other dumbeks. Plus the treble tones are muted, which makes them nice on the ears in closed quarters, but sets the player at a disadvantage when trying to cut through a louder mix. I've also found that in being lighter in weight, they can slip around on my leg, which means I sometimes have to readjust it in the middle of playing.

    Now comes my personal favorite, the ceramic dumbek with mylar head. The one I own is a Mid-east Manufacturing model. This honey pumps out killer bass tones and crackling treble tones. It's also finger sensitive (though not as much as the Turkish models) and especially sensitive to muting techniques. (Probably the most sensitive off all for such playing.) It also has great sustain in the bass tones and makes for about the best drum for damping techniques. (The udu-like sound you can get by pushing your hand into the bottom of the drum while hitting some "dums.")

    So why am I not recommending my favorite one? Well, because for starters it's ceramic. It's highly breakable. I've had idiot friends break more than one. It's also heavy, so if you have a breakable, heavy object you're not that likely to be travelling with it. And personally, I've found that I can't help but wail on the thing. I just love the pounding and cracking so much that I cannot stop myself from playing hard, loud and fast. (Not that this isn't great...after all, this is a drum made for rocking it out.)


    Then there are those cheaper, mostly Pakistani models that you'll see almost everywhere for sale from curio shops to malls. They're a little different from the dumbek of the Middle East. Often they're held djembe-style and utilize a bit of a different technique. Plus they're often very cheaply made. But they do have a nice sound when in capable hands. I'd just stick with the Middle Eastern models for now.


    Hope this helps.
    We’re not gonna diminish our joy just because they live in denial.

  6. "Quiet as a Khukuri"

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    Default Dear sir...

    To say that the best come with 8 tuning bolts is not exactly true. You will still have stable tunability with a 6-bolt model.

    An excellent Darbouka/Tabla player from Lebanon (Rony Barrak) has a prefered model with which there are only 4 tuning bolts!!!
    He is very good. I have his first solo album and the special two disc Harem album by Sarah Brightman which features a lot of his Darbouka and Riq work. You can see him perform (at least for a little bit) on disc 2 which is a documentary DVD to the album.

    I'm sure you would make the sound you want with either model and good practice.

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