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  1. Registered User

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    Default 'Fat' snare sound?

    Hey guys, I've been trying and trying to time my snare so that it has that big fat 'doosh' sound. I have no idea!!
    I have new heads, and brand new puresound custom wires. The snare is 14" by 7" so it's deep, but I don't know how to tune it.
    Please help

  2. Registered User

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    I've heard tune it down really low but then there is a lot of ringing, and it sounds like a Tom then. I am really lost

  3. Registered User

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    What heads did you put on? And what kind of material is the shell? I can give you several suggestions with a little more info. Any snare tuned low will RING! To get that type of sound you have to either like the ring or muffle to get rid of it. I prefer moon gel for muffling personally, but there are a lot of ways to do it.

  4. TOO LOUD

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    I've got a 8x14 brass... I usually tune it up so it has a nice ring to it, but I've tuned it low before.

    What is the shell made of? What heads are you using?

    To get a fat sound, I use a Hazy 300 on the snare-side with a 42-strand strainer, and a Remo Pinstripe on the batter (I know that most people might think this is heresy, but I assure you, if you're looking for a fat, wet sound, this head works great).

    The snare-side is cranked, very tight. And the batter is tuned just above wrinkle. This gives a deep, fat sound. It will ring, so you may want a moongel to control it.

    The only downside to this is the batter is not very responsive in terms of rebound. If your stick technique relies on rebound, then you will need to use more wrist than if the batter was tighter, as it usually is on a snare.

    Hope that helps!
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  5. Registered User

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    Xero talent pretty much nailed it. As for the batter head, if you want a fat, wet sound I could also recommend an Evans Hydraulic, you wouldn't have to muffle it as much. If you wanted the fat sound, but not as wet, you could use an Evans ST Dry or HD Dry. You would need to muffle those more though to tame the ring. As for tension, I go with a little tighter than just above wrinkle, enough to get a good response out of the head, since as mentioned the just above wrinkle will leave you with little to no rebound. Get us those specifics and we can probably make some even more tailored recommendations!

  6. Registered User

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    When I was tuning my 14x6.5 steel ff super low, I used an Aquarian Hi Impact head, arguably the thickest snare head available. It sounded fantastic at any tuning, and has just the right amount of ring as long as I didn't hit rim shots all the time, in which case it would turn into a choir.

    Anyways, if it's a metal snare, I say use a thick head (at least 14 mil) and tune both heads down. and I think less wires would be better, because the snare will be resonating a lot more.
    selling a few big Dream cymbals (Bliss and Vintage Bliss)
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  7. Registered User

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    Already stated in thread. Thick head on top, bottom head tuned up tight (a bit tighter than normal I guess) and the top head tuned low to a point where you can play it but it's definitely not standard rebound.

  8. Too many drummers

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    Vintage emperor tuned really low with some moongel or a light ring on it .... it's King Fatness ! trust me.
    Pearl MLX sequoia red (long lugs)
    Pearl "All maple shell" snare 14x6.5
    Ludwig Supraphonic "Chrome over brass" snare 14x6.5
    Yamaha brass snare 14x5.5
    Pearl free floating brass snare 14x6.5
    Sabian and Zildjian cymbals.

  9. I'm Ron $%&# Swanson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xero Talent View Post
    I've got a 8x14 brass... I usually tune it up so it has a nice ring to it, but I've tuned it low before.

    What is the shell made of? What heads are you using?

    To get a fat sound, I use a Hazy 300 on the snare-side with a 42-strand strainer, and a Remo Pinstripe on the batter (I know that most people might think this is heresy, but I assure you, if you're looking for a fat, wet sound, this head works great).

    The snare-side is cranked, very tight. And the batter is tuned just above wrinkle. This gives a deep, fat sound. It will ring, so you may want a moongel to control it.

    The only downside to this is the batter is not very responsive in terms of rebound. If your stick technique relies on rebound, then you will need to use more wrist than if the batter was tighter, as it usually is on a snare.

    Hope that helps!
    Good post. Tune the snare side head tight and tune the batter head low with loose snare wires.
    "Any dog under 50 pounds is a cat and cats are useless."- Ron Swanson

    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us."- Calvin (Bill Watterson)

  10. Registered Amuser

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    Quote Originally Posted by dudewuttheheck

    Good post. Tune the snare side head tight and tune the batter head low with loose snare wires.
    Isn't that Benny Greb's method?


    PSN: MitchTheDrummer - send your PDF name if you add me

  11. TOO LOUD

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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchLyons

    Isn't that Benny Greb's method?
    Dunno, this is just my method, although I'm sure I'm not the only one that does it. Seemed logical to me.
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  12. Too many hobbies

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    Try using a thicker bottom head like a Remo Emperor Snare Side. Make sure it's a Snare Side, not a regular Emperor. Only drawback is that you loose some of the snare response.
    Also, try using a double layer head like a Pinstripe (or even a Powerstroke 3 will work). Make sure it's a coated head. This will give it a warmer tone.
    You can also try using things like Moongels or RemO's or something similar.
    Sometimes a drum is just stuborn and nothing you do will give you quite what you have in your head. It's usually best to not try to make the drum sound like something you have invisioned, but find the sound that it produces best. If you try to force it beyond it's capabilities you might suffer elsewhere, such as projection, snare response, or head rebound.
    If your still not happy with the sound your getting I would suggest selling it and doing research and try to find that snare that will give you the sound you so desire.
    Best of Luck

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