Pearl Drummers Forum - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 12 of 13
  1. Registered User

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default Another Newbie question... sorry.. ;)

    Hello, I recently acquired a set of Pearl Forum Series drums and have been reading I should upgrade the heads and get new cymbals. Can someone please advise me on what I need to do? I've been reading the Evans EC2 heads are a good choice for this set. My question is.. what all do I need to do to change the heads? Do I need to replace the bottom heads as well or just the top heads? Is there something better than the Evans EC2 I should consider? What about the snare and Floor Tom? How do I "tune" the drums? Are there any decent cymbal packs I should consider? I don't mind buying used and actually is probably all I can afford right now. I'm mainly looking for the rock / classic rock sound.
    Btw, I got the Metallic Charcoal set and it only came with one Pearl Crash/Ride cymbal and stand and the hi-hat. I'm guessing I'll need to add another cymbal stand or two when I find a cymbal pack.

    Thanks!
    Dave

  2. Psychdrummer

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, Tn
    Posts
    959

    Default

    Welcome to the forum. Head choice is about personal preference, but it seems you have limited experience in this area. The EC2 is a good head and I've got them on my kit at the moment. I also like Remo clear Emperors and find them easy to tune. As far as snare heads go, a coated Ambassador is a good choice. There are some good videos on drum tuning on YouTube that may be more helpful since you can see and hear the process. What is your budget for cymbals? As far as cymbal stands, those can be picked up pretty reasonably depending on what you're looking for specifically (straight, boom). Give us a bit more info and we'll try to steer you in the right direction.
    Tama Silverstar Jazz (18x14, 12x8, 14x14, 14x5), 12x7 Mapex Black Panther snare, Pearl M80 Snare, DW 10x5 Collector's Series tom
    Sabian & Zildjian cymbals, Tama Iron Cobra double belt drive pedal (For sale), DW5000 double pedal

  3. Matt Flacche
    #3
    Guest

    Default

    Definitely watch videos on tuning your drums. It is also important to stretch your heads as you install them. This will help them stay in tune longer once you have them sounding the way you like. I would go with clear or coated emperors or clear pinstripes... just my opinion.

  4. Registered User

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    325

    Default

    For a Forum, I'd put clear or coated EC2's (your choice, coated will "warm" and darken the tone and clear will open it up) all around the kit, including a coated EC2 on the snare drum. For the bass drum, I'd go with an EMAD. You can save money by keeping the bottom heads (they're the ones you don't hit, and they're called "resonant heads") as the stock Pearl heads or if you do have the cash you can upgrade to Evans Reso head or Evans clear G1 on the toms, and Evans snare side for the snare reso (look up Youtube videos on how the change heads). Meinl, Paiste, Sabian, and Zildjian all offer low-priced cymbal packs, so take your pick. Maybe go to a music store and test out some cymbals in your price range so you know what you like. As for extra hardware such as cymbal stands, don't skimp on those. I would get Pearl 900 series, or if you're strapped for cash a Pearl 800 series would do - just don't buy any small-brand junk or low-end stuff like Sound Percussion etc. Stands take more wear and tear than you'd think so you want something that can hold up.

  5. Too many hobbies

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    694

    Default

    Remo Pinstripes, man. EC2s are good, I have them on my kit now, But I think the Pinstripe would be a better choice for someone not use to tuning. They are a bit more forgivable. the EC2s I think, will be a bit too "bright" for what you are looking for.
    For the reso heads, I have heard that you should change them once a year. I have yet to do this myself because I am always broke. I would suggest changing the ones that are on there now, you can't be sure how long they have been on there, or how they were treated b4 u got them.
    For you snare I think the Coated Powerstroke 3 will work well for you. The control ring will help you control the sound and it is a very durable head.

    PumaPhreak is right, it "is about personal preference". And, it will take you awhile to find what works for you. There are new heads coming out all the time. If you can, experiment on head choices. Soon you will have an idea of what your looking for and how to get it.
    Good Luck.

  6. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Johannesburg, SA
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Hey Dawson! Welcome to the PDF - hope you enjoy your stay!

    I was in a similar situation when I first got my Forum - but the guys here were a great help, and steered me in the right direction. Currently using Evans EC2's on my toms, an Evans EC Reverse Dot on the snare (I have an Evans ST Dry as a spare, and to change things up a bit), and an Evans EQ4 on the kick. It took me ages, and a lot of research before I settled on these, but I wish I'd checked out the Evans website sooner. It contains sound files for each of their drum heads, which helps a lot when choosing the sound you're looking for (as heads can't really be tested in stores, etc). I haven't bought any resonant heads, as the Pearl ones on my kit are still pretty decent.

    As for cymbals, I was looking for anything that would be a step up from the standard issue Pearl (s)crap (see my sig!) - luckily, I came across a used set of Paiste PST5's - got them at a good price, and they're awesome! Anything from Paiste, Sabian, Zildjian or Meinl should do the trick - and don't be afraid to buy used!

    As for tuning, like the others have said, the interwebs is your best bet - there are loads of clips out there that will help you along.
    Last edited by The Voice; 05-02-2012 at 02:02 PM. Reason: i ken spel gud
    Pearl Cymbals - The Best Reason To Make Drums

  7. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,517

    Default

    There is no necessity to purchase new heads right away, so I suggest Savin your cash. Wear out the heads that are on there and while you're doing so go and bang a few different varieties in the shops so you get a feel for the options.

    Also, with cymbals, it's always a toss up whether to go for a marginal improvement (branded entry level cymbals) or something pro. Really depends on your budget. Whilst it can be recommended to buy pro cymbals first up (do it once and do it right) your taste may change as your playing develops, so that should be a consideration.
    Last edited by MattKeaton; 05-11-2012 at 07:33 PM.
    Pearl/Dixon/Paiste/LP/Remo/Pro-Mark 5ABN

  8. Mountain Man

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    2,596

    Default

    I agree with Matt. Clear Emperors, coated Emperors or clear pinstripes. I have pinstripes currently and love 'em. I also have a set of clear emperors as backup. For my snare, I'm using an evans ec1 reverse dot just to try something new, but I usually run a remo CS coated or and EmperorX. I also have an ambassadorX coated that I'm going to throw on the snare to try out. For my kick I use an evans EMAD II batter and an Emad resonant with a 4'' port. For tuning, try using the "just after wrinkles" (JAW) method. It will give your drums a nice musical thud and it doesn't take forever!
    1) Place drum on carpeted floor, remove the top and bottom heads
    2) Inspect the drum for dirt around the bearing edge, as well as for loose lug screws (I found the screws loose that hold my snare strainer...wierd right?)
    3) do one side at a time
    4) place the head on, then the rim
    5) evenly tension all the tuning rods using the star pattern. (google images, tuning pattern for drums)
    6) Place your palm firmly in the center to seat the head and using 1/4 or even 1/8 turns with your key until you feel some tension
    7) remove hand and inspect for wrinkles
    8) remove wrinkles by tightening the appropriate rod
    9) tap drum to check for tone
    10) if the sound is too flappy or dead, tune up using the star pattern in very small incriments until you find a desirable pitch. I find it important to raise the tension in very small incriments, checking the sound each time
    11) once you find the right sound, tap and inch or so from each lug, adjusting any that are much higher or lower...It doesn' have to be perfect!
    * some like the bottom head a bit tighter than the top. This provides a downward pitch bend.
    you shouldn't have to stress and you should only spend a few min on each drum. Keep Experimenting, as the more you practice the better you'll get! Drum dials and other tuning aids are not needed, and can be habit forming. (I had to kick my drum dial habit)
    For the snare, I go moderately tight on the top (I'll get slight flex when I push down in the middle of the snare with my index finger) and a slightly higher pitch on the bottom head. Do not over tension your snares, as this causes a nasty, choked sound. Loosen them and hit the snare, doing this in incriments of one, checking the tension between each turn. Keep going just until your snare wires make full contact with the drum...and you're done! Good luck and welcome to the forum!!

  9. Mountain Man

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    2,596

    Default

    Ebay has a lot of great deals on hardware as well. I just picked up a pearl s1000 snare stand used in perfect condition for $82 free shipping. Stick with the pearl 800 or 900 series like Capa said.

  10. The Honey Badger....

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Texas Gulf Coast
    Posts
    1,838

    Default

    If you need tuning assistance, consider a drum dial. It measures the tension on your drum head near each lug and helps you get an even, ballpark adjustment on the head prior to fine tuning it by ear. Opinions vary, mostly because of those who believe in traditional techniques, but I like mine. I can have the head tuned and ready to go in a few short moments, meanwhile, out of respect for the old school guys, I continue to also use my ears for fine tuning and double checking the dial. Hope it helps.

    Update: I just read an above post I missed the first time that gave some of the same info. Forgive me for doubling up that way, but I agree with the above that the drum dial should just be an introductory thing at the most. I guess I might have to kick the habit too
    Pearl Masters (MCX) Mocha Tamo
    Pearl Session Custom (SMX) Green Burst
    Zildjian A & K Customs
    Quote Originally Posted by ashmaple View Post
    ... so I secretely wanna see him 'bust his gear out when he's doing their gig in front of the crowds that lead into Make a legendary show. Hajahaha.

  11. Registered User

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    3,517

    Default

    I make no apologies for using a DrumDial to dial in a relatively even tension and go from there completely by ear. It's always worked for me. I suppose it would be good to say I'm so awesome I don't need a DD. Chances are, I don't need it, but it sure is efficient. And I'm all for efficiency
    MD
    Pearl/Dixon/Paiste/LP/Remo/Pro-Mark 5ABN

  12. Mountain Man

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    2,596

    Default

    shoot, I still have and use my DD on occasion, I think it is very helpful. One thing that is also really helpful is a guitar tuner. I've been using it to experiment tuning to specific notes. Mine is a standard metronome/tuner

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •