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  1. Registered User

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    Default Wood Or Steel Snare?

    Which would be better fitted for hard rock/metal? I have a Tama steel snare and a Yamaha wooden snare but i'm not sure which type of wood it is.
    Which type do you guys prefer and why?

  2. Registered User

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    I like to close my eyes and play the snare... and let my ears choose... saying that.. i have a thick arse wood snare that has metal as well (FF). Best in both worlds? haha. But i usually use wood snares.

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  3. At the Crossroads

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    Anything maple and 6 in.or deeper
    If you're not Groovin in the Pocket you're just makin noise!

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  4. Drum Ninja

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    Ultracast Aluminum is always a good choice. It's powerfull but doesn't have the annoying ringy steel sound. The sound is much darker, almost like a really thick ply birch or maple snare.
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  5. SUPREME MODULATOR

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    Aug 2002
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    It really doesn't matter. Either wood or metal is suitable for any situation. Those that still believe otherwise, simply read too many catalogs or haven't gigged since the mid-60's.

    In theory...metal is better suited simply because many metal snares can be tuned to penetrate through amplified guitar a little easier than many wood snares...but which wood snares? I have a maple Valkyrie that will destroy most metal snares in competition for volume and projection. But then... a 3-5mm cast metal(any metal) snare, will destroy my Valkyrie.

    It's not as simple as metal vs wood. A thick wood drum will when tuned accordingly, project better than a thin(1-2mm) metal drum. A thick(3-5mm) metal drum can cut more than anything...but will not have the tone of a wood drum. That's not necessarily bad...it just is.

    In practical applications...
    it really doesn't matter, because with a mic, any drum can cut as much or as little as a drummer, engineer, or producer desires, regardless of the construction. A drum should be chosen for how well it stands on it's own. It should be chosen for tone, response, feel, looks, cost...not whether or not it will stand up against Johnny Drop-D's amplifier.

    In acoustic situations without microphones...the volume of the drum really comes down to head tension, stick size, the drummer, and rimshots. The difference between wood or metal won't be audible in high-volume situations.

    In anything so loud, that mics are required for snare...use whatever you like because the volume and projection can be controlled out front.

  6. Sweet sound of HAARP

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    I never tryed a high quality metal snare but from the sound I've heard from them and that ring sounds awesome imo.
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  7. Registered User

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    Mar 2010
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    These days I'm using an acrylic snare

    For louder rock stuff, I like the sound of a metal snare. For more sensitive jazz/funk, I like wood snares. PYRRHO's right though, it really all depends, and either type of snare can work in any situation - with the right heads, tuning, miking, etc.

    One interesting option could be to play one snare, and trigger the sound of the other so you get both metal and wood sounds at the same time. John Stanier did this with Helmet sometimes, and I think it sounds pretty sweet (never tried it myself though...)

  8. Snare fanatic

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    May 2007
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    I think either could do the job, depending on the particular snare ... but when it comes to metal snares, I'm not a fan of steel. Brass, bronze, copper, occasionally aluminum, but steel just isn't a sound I like. It's hard to describe, but it doesn't seem to me that it has any character.

  9. Registered User

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    Feb 2010
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    both work great but metal snares are generally louder

    i have a 14X5 pearl maple free floating snare, and i play metal/punk/other hard rock genres and it works great, but i have been thinking about getting a brass or copper shell

    id reccomend buying a free floater becuase if you want a different snare you can buy a new shell instead of a new snare, they come in maple brass an copper

  10. Dude Dudestofferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by motleyh View Post
    I think either could do the job, depending on the particular snare ... but when it comes to metal snares, I'm not a fan of steel. Brass, bronze, copper, occasionally aluminum, but steel just isn't a sound I like. It's hard to describe, but it doesn't seem to me that it has any character.
    steel snares have their applications. mainly tuned waaay up in a reggae kit.

    for metal/hard rock, I'm a believer in brass and aluminum.

    if you just have the 2 snares and aren't looking to add anything...just try 'em both and see.
    assuming they're the same size, the steel will probably tune higher and cut more.
    as long as the wooden snare isn't luan or basswood, it should have more tone.

  11. Drumoholic

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    I would go with a birch snare - lots of cut and a nice warm sound. I have heard metal snares that sound good too though. So either wood or metal is a good choice.
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  12. Registered User

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    Bodmin, Cornwall, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night_Wolf View Post
    Which would be better fitted for hard rock/metal? I have a Tama steel snare and a Yamaha wooden snare but i'm not sure which type of wood it is.
    Which type do you guys prefer and why?
    Steel Black Panthers rule for playing metal, especially the smaller ones. However the Birdseye Maple is also sweet as.
    I would imagine that the Tama would be better suited? Got one with my old Superstar and it sounded great with an Aquarian Performance II head.
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