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  1. Registered User

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    Default poplar wood and drum making

    Okay... so i search on this forum and did some research ... just to get this out of the way first this is what I found:

    - poplar wood is not "bad sounding" or "cheap quality" wood... rather it was a wood that has certain sounds properties... but is abundant and thus was inexpensive for drum construction.
    - a lot of older (and prized) vintage drums were made using poplar as the core of the drum... with a vener of another wood (sometimes mahogany) inside and outside b/c poplar wood did not have as nice of a finish as some other woods. In fact it sometimes had greenish/bluish (i think) marks in the wood

    Other things i've found are that keller shells are making vintage shells which have a poplar core, mahogany on the inside and out (i think a very thin ply) with maple reinforcing rings. Also, this is the same construction as dw's classic series shells.

    Also,... harder/denser woods typically have more low end... for example bubinga and mahogany have good low end. I believe mahogany is used more in the reference series shells for their floor toms and bass drums for this sonic property. So... i'm not sure how hard/dense poplar as compare to other woods.

    Okay... so with that out of the way... i'm thinking that the keller mahogany vintage shells would make a nice bass drum. I just emailed them to see if they make deeper shell depths for their kicks. I'm not particularly looking for a tubby sound though (as some vintage sounding drums have been described). I play harder music (metal core/rock) but also play jazz too. I find that a versatile/musical drum will suit any/most music style anyways... and for the extreme sounds that you hear on records that's all the result of processing like compression and eq'ing, reverb etc anyways.

    Opinions?

    Here are some useful links:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id14.html
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLBb-4j87FY
    http://www.dwdrums.com/drums/classics/index.htm
    http://www.kelleratthecore.com/vintage_mahogany.html

  2. I <3 Miss Pearl

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AppleSeed View Post
    Okay... so i search on this forum and did some research ... just to get this out of the way first this is what I found:

    - poplar wood is not "bad sounding" or "cheap quality" wood... rather it was a wood that has certain sounds properties... but is abundant and thus was inexpensive for drum construction.
    - a lot of older (and prized) vintage drums were made using poplar as the core of the drum... with a vener of another wood (sometimes mahogany) inside and outside b/c poplar wood did not have as nice of a finish as some other woods. In fact it sometimes had greenish/bluish (i think) marks in the wood

    Other things i've found are that keller shells are making vintage shells which have a poplar core, mahogany on the inside and out (i think a very thin ply) with maple reinforcing rings. Also, this is the same construction as dw's classic series shells.

    Also,... harder/denser woods typically have more low end... for example bubinga and mahogany have good low end. I believe mahogany is used more in the reference series shells for their floor toms and bass drums for this sonic property. So... i'm not sure how hard/dense poplar as compare to other woods.

    Okay... so with that out of the way... i'm thinking that the keller mahogany vintage shells would make a nice bass drum. I just emailed them to see if they make deeper shell depths for their kicks. I'm not particularly looking for a tubby sound though (as some vintage sounding drums have been described). I play harder music (metal core/rock) but also play jazz too. I find that a versatile/musical drum will suit any/most music style anyways... and for the extreme sounds that you hear on records that's all the result of processing like compression and eq'ing, reverb etc anyways.

    Opinions?

    Here are some useful links:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id14.html
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLBb-4j87FY
    http://www.dwdrums.com/drums/classics/index.htm
    http://www.kelleratthecore.com/vintage_mahogany.html
    There are many different types of 'poplar'. It's an entire genus of wood.

    The issue is somewhat complicated, suffice to say that the type of 'poplar' in low end drums is usually plantation grown in many different parts of Asia, whereas the 'poplar' in Keller drums and their American predecessors are a different species of wood.

    The asian poplar is similar to basswood.

  3. Registered User

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    Default

    Cool thanks for the reply

    Anyone else?

  4. InGlorious Basterd

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    poplar is really soft, my ex is really ringy, heaps of overtones, i try to work with them live to get a louder kit that doesent sound like cardboard, but in the studio they have alot of unwanted overtones.....and they havent got the lowest fundemental pitch ahha

    to be honest im sick of my poplar export, cant fault anything else, hardware is amazing, bearing edges flawless....but poplar is a **** wood in my opinion...
    "To the heart of me and your spilling grief, To answer to a God who never answers you"
    Oceansize

    Brass Sensitone & cymbals

  5. So others may live.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant View Post
    poplar is really soft, my ex is really ringy, heaps of overtones, i try to work with them live to get a louder kit that doesent sound like cardboard, but in the studio they have alot of unwanted overtones.....and they havent got the lowest fundemental pitch ahha

    to be honest im sick of my poplar export, cant fault anything else, hardware is amazing, bearing edges flawless....but poplar is a **** wood in my opinion...
    Certain wood, edge and drum head combinations do not go well together. an Example: Pinstripe heads and Maple with a 45 degree bearding edge make a dead thud, not very desirable; Pinstripes and Birch with 45 degree bearing edges and correct tuning create a huge sound, and doesn't sound anything like a dead thud. Sometimes you can't just make the drum work with the drum head, you'll have to find the drum head to work with the drum.
    Peace?

  6. InGlorious Basterd

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    Quote Originally Posted by SKC View Post
    Certain wood, edge and drum head combinations do not go well together. an Example: Pinstripe heads and Maple with a 45 degree bearding edge make a dead thud, not very desirable; Pinstripes and Birch with 45 degree bearing edges and correct tuning create a huge sound, and doesn't sound anything like a dead thud. Sometimes you can't just make the drum work with the drum head, you'll have to find the drum head to work with the drum.
    i agree, i have had ec2s/coated g2/g2clear/ and now ec1 coated ( all over a clear G1)

    it took a while and a lot of money (for me) to get there but i found the best head for it, never the less...sick of poplar haha
    Last edited by ant; 11-16-2009 at 12:03 AM.
    "To the heart of me and your spilling grief, To answer to a God who never answers you"
    Oceansize

    Brass Sensitone & cymbals

  7. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant View Post
    i agree, i have had ec2s/coated g2/g2clear/ and now ec2 coated ( all over a clear G1)

    it took a while and a lot of money (for me) to get there but i found the best head for it, never the less...sick of poplar haha
    That isn't a lot of variance in heads at all, and I think you should take a look at your tuning if you're getting lots of overtones with EC2's.

  8. So others may live.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant View Post
    i agree, i have had ec2s/coated g2/g2clear/ and now ec2 coated ( all over a clear G1)

    it took a while and a lot of money (for me) to get there but i found the best head for it, never the less...sick of poplar haha
    I don't blame you, I don't like the tone of poplar, either. It's really a case of you like the tone of a certain wood or you don't.
    Peace?

  9. InGlorious Basterd

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    nah mate, i can tuen very well, i dont get overtones with ec2 i hated it, liked the attack but even in my room at home, it sounded very one dimensional and boxy, sorry i dident explain properly

    the coated ec1 (i typoed ec2 instead of ec1, its now edited ) where the best middle ground, becuase the natrual characteristics of the wood where so ringy i originaly tried to deaden them, realised it was way to much eventualy got to a 1 ply coated head which im happy with
    "To the heart of me and your spilling grief, To answer to a God who never answers you"
    Oceansize

    Brass Sensitone & cymbals

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