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  1. IamCraiger

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    Quote Originally Posted by premiumdrummer View Post
    your case is defiantly rim shots by the sounds of it.. lug locks will fix it, i use it for al my snare drums.
    yip, i figured that, but it doesnt happen on my other snares... interesting as the Virgil is the only one with cast hoops and tube lugs...
    Yamaha Recording Custom
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  2. Registered User

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    I use "Tightscrews" on my snare drum. Tightscrews are screws used on the U.S. Apache attack helicopter. Works great on drums for detuning issues.

  3. Moderator

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    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    Tightscrews are screws used on the U.S. Apache attack helicopter.
    Who told you that lie? Tighscrews are not and were not ever used on aircraft of any kind.

    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    Works great on drums for detuning issues.

    They have actually been discussed in other threads. While they will stop detuning under most conditions, they have alot of downsides.

    1. First and foremost, you will no longer be able to tune a drum to the correct tension by the feel of the drum key. Because of what keeps them from lossening, that same feature will make them always have drag on them so your going to be forced to do all your tweaking by sound. This will slow you down alot.

    2. No more quick head changes with one finger. With normal tension rods, i can spin out a rod with one finger on the drum key like a crank. I can also re-install them the same way. Not going to happen with these.

    3. You cannot lubricate them. Oil and grease will damage them. In fact, they want you to make sure the lubricant is removed from the lug inserts as well. So now you are going to introduce even more friction into lugs which will further complicate tuning. And worse yet, the thin coat of oil on tension rods prevents rust, that will be gone now. You can end up with frozen lugs that have rusted in place. Happens more often then you think on cheap or poorly maintained kits. With Pearl Masters and higher series kits, your going to be getting rid of the amazing stainless steel/brass never sieze tension rod setup and replacing it with these? That is a DOWNGRADE!.

    4. Look at the price. To do an entire 5 piece kit your talking almost $75.00. And keep in mind, if you do alot of head changes, these will not last forever. The polymer insert wears out.

    I can do an entire 5 piece kit with Lug Locks for far less cost then Tight Screws. I do not have to change tension rods, they have zero impact on tension while your changing heads or tuning, do not require you to remove lubrication from tension rods or lugs and simple to install and remove.

    I tried Tight screws and did not even finish installing them on the entire kit before i removed them. Then i had to work on a kit with them and was cursing them the whole time. It's another "build a better mousetrap" type product. Just like Lockerz. Lug Locks are simple and crude so people try and improve them. But the fact is, they are the best.

    If Tight Screws were some long awaited savior to lugs loosening, then why do virtually ZERO pro's use them? Why does'nt every major drum store carry them? Even for the amateurs, they are a waste.

    Just my 2c.
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  4. LosDientesTerribles

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    Yeah, I am totally not going to go the Tightscrew route. Too much of a pain.

    As soon as I can get a set of lug locks in my hand, I'll report back on my findings.
    Pearl Masters Custom
    7-piece MCX408 (Pewter Glass)

    Racks: 8x7", 10x8", and 12x9"
    Floors: 14x14" and 16x16"
    Kick: 22x18"
    Snare: 14x5" Morgan Rose signature snare
    Hardware: 503C rack, DW 9000 series pedals, Zildjian cymbals

  5. Registered User

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    Just wanted to point that "Tightscrews" is nothing new and it is a technology used in Apache helicopters. Who wants a screw to back out in a crucial part, flying in combat, at 250 ft. above the deck? Albeit, the technology maybe new to the drum industry. Someone took the idea and applied the technology to the drum detuning issue and the drum industry.

    Also is was brought up as to why they are not available everywhere. It is called exclusive distributor agreements. These are a patented product and the inventor or patent holder may want to have exclusive distributor rights and keep those rights close for a purpose. There are many products in our life we use that you cannot get everywhere, anytime. To a touring pro, such as Slipknot, that is important.

    Also, Slipknot from your other postings on the forum you mention that you do not remove the lug locks from your tension rods when tuning and that there is enough friction to keep the lug lock from not falling off during this process. How is it then that the increased friction applied by the lug locks so as to keep them on the tension rod during the tuning process, does not equate to the increased amount of tension needed to turn a Tightscrew tension rod? Having a lug lock on a tension rod while tuning a drum, does that not take away the "feel" of the drum while tuning? I am curious as to how that works, or am I missing something?

    I have tried lug locks. I found them to work fairly well, but did have some issues. But mostly I thought they were dog ugly on my drums. But that is probably not important to the touring pro or professional drummer.

    Just like any product, they have their place and purpose. However, if you do try Tightscrews as a product, at least give them a chance and use them for awhile before making biased decisions. One simple partial application of any product and then stating you did not like them only shows a bias. However, to the professional drum tech, they don't have much time to experiment. They go with what they know works from practical experience.

    And yes, there are quite a few others out there that use the product. See below.



    "Modern Drummer
    August 2005
    Chap Ostrander

    Did you ever find yourself "playing ping-pong" in the middle of a rock gig? You know the feeling. You're playing all-out, slamming into the pocket with sledgehammer force. As the gig progresses, your snare doesn't sound the same as when you started. You tap the batter head near the lugs and find that most of the tension points sound like "ping," but when you tap the spots where the rimshots land, you hear "pong."

    If you've been taking notes during the past few years, you know that this phenomenon is due to heavy playing momentarily reducing the pressure on those tension rods, allowing them to loosen in response to shell vibration. Various manufacturers have dealt with this problem over the years, using such things as locking nuts against the lugs or molded plastic heads that go on the rods to keep them in place. These solutions can take extra time and effort, and can interfere with fine-tuning capabilities. Carl Scott Percussion has come up with something different that does the job without the drawbacks.

    The TightScrew is a non-loosening tension rod that is designed to stay right where you put it. It features a small channel cut along the length of the rod where the threads go into the lug. The channel is filled with something that looks like nylon, and the friction of this substance against the threads inside the lug casing keeps the rod in place. This technology is used on Apache helicopters to prevent parts from loosening under extreme vibration and temperature conditions.

    To test how well the TightScrew rods worked, I replaced two rods on my snare and laid into it. The TightScrew rods stayed right in place, and I didn't have to do any retuning during the test period. I appreciated having infinite control over my tuning, without the constraints of a device that uses a plastic edge or ball-bearing click to hold the rod in place.

    Carl Scott says that if you play at light to moderate volumes, you only need to replace the rods positioned immediately under your sticks. For higher volume levels they suggest that you replace all the rods on the rim. Once this is done, you shouldn't need to do anything until the head stretches. The rods come with a 30-day money-back guarantee, which should be plenty of time to determine if you'll have a problem. The rods on my test snare remain where I first tuned them, and I haven't had to touch them since.

    TightScrew rods are available in three lengths: 1 5/8" (42 mm), 2" (52 mm), and 2 1/2" (65 mm). I think they're worth it; you can get tight and stay loose at the same time.

    DRUM! Magazine
    May 2006
    Brad Schlueter

    Have you ever noticed how the tension rods in your snare's rimshot zone loosen more quickly than other tension rods? The vibration and brief changes in head tension that occur from heavy hitting can conspire to detune a drum. It's a common problem for strong-arm players, but even those of you who don't hit that hard may have the same trouble if you favor die-cast hoops, tube lugs, or highly tensioned heads -- all of which transfer more vibration. Now there may be a solution to all your whacking woes -- TightScrews from Carl Scott Percussion.

    At first glance, they appear to be conventional, chromed-steel tension rods. On closer examination, you'll notice that through their threads is cut a narrow slot filled with a hard nylon material. This material increases the friction and surface area between the TightScrew and the receiving nut, thus preventing detuning. Do the gizmos actually work? Absolutely. I tried them under darn-near-abusive hammering, and once my ears stopped ringing, I didn't detect any tuning changes. Because I had to eventually give the TightScrews back, though, I wasn't able to check how many times you can change your heads before the plastic insert loses some of its effectiveness. But I have faith.

    Some drummers may use them only on snare batters, but I think TightScrews could actually help all over your kit. Ever have a tension rod fall out from the bottom of a tom during a particularly thrashing solo? Pick up a pack of TightScrews and you never will. Unfortunately, TightScrews aren't currently offered for Sonor or DW drums, both of which use proprietary tension-rod designs, but the good news (which we learned at press time) is that Carl Scott Percussion now offers longer versions that can replace all the rods on your bass drum.

    "To Whom It may Concern,

    I have been playing drums for over 40 years and I've never appreciated a product as much as yours. I play all styles of music and consider myself a heavy hitter, so de-tuning was always a problem for me. Now, my snare drum de-tuning problems are a thing of the past... I currently use a Pearl Steve Ferrone 6 1/2x14 snare and use tightscrews on both the batter and resonant head. I played a gig last Saturday night with my band Mirage and not once did I have to adjust my snare. It was an enjoyable experience not having to constantly re-tune after every set.

    This is a product I would recommend to all drummers.

    Thanks again, "
    Joe Ward

    "Just wanted to let you know that I got the rods and as soon as I go them, I put them on immediately. Since I have been playing on them, in my opinion, these rods are by far the best anti de tuning product I have played on.

    Out of habit, I check my tension rods every chance I get when I am playing and not once have your rods come loose on me. When playing on ordinary tension rods, I usually have to crank them back tight on my snare drum every song. Because of those regular rods coming loose, it has caused me to break through heads at shows and become a total inconvenience. I've tried just about every other product out there to prevent the rods from coming loose. Gels to lug locks and they all have problems of one kind or another.

    I consider myself to be a very heavy hitter. In the rock band I play with, we play three hour sets straight through and every hit on my snare drum is a rim shot. Constantly having to pay attention to my tension rods coming loose is a thing of the past now. Your tensions rods have given me total confidence to go into a show and not worry about them coming loose. Thank you so much Carl!"

    Jason Sochaki-Drummer
    Lounge Puppets

    "I tried the tension rods sent to me by Mr. Scott on a drum that has had some problems with 2 t-rods on top and the same 2 on bottom of a 13" snare drum with die-cast hoops and tube lugs (those 2 factors tend to increase DE-tuning due to fact that tube lugs have no real shock absorbing mechanism, such as swivel nuts and their retainers, causing an immediate transfer of energy from head-to shell-to lug- to rod - resulting in DE-tuning. Also die cast hoops can transfer that DE-tuning action readily when rim shots are constantly struck.)

    These tension rods when placed in those 4 positions immediately alleviated the problem and allowed the drum to be played quite hard for an entire 1 hour set of heavy rock music WITHOUT HAVING TO BE TIGHTENED ONCE!.

    Mr. Scott may very well have a revolutionary product here that could save a lot of drummers from countless interruptions in a performance by having to constantly 're-tighten' a drum that has gone loose even in the middle of a song."

    Rob Kampa-Owner
    Magstar Drums

    "The TightScrew tension rod has been a welcomed treat for me. For years I would always have my tension rods coming loose where I played rim shots.

    Each set I would have to tighten the bottom and top tension rods so my snare drum was back in tune. But now I play a complete show with never tightening any tension rods on my snare ... A truly remarkable design, simple and clean.

    Nothing to clamp to the tension rod, just the simple look of an ordinary tension rod that won't back out.

    Thank You."
    John Litrenta-Owner
    Midwest Percussion
    "

  6. Moderator

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    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    Just wanted to point that "Tightscrews" is nothing new and it is a technology used in Apache helicopters. Who wants a screw to back out in a crucial part, flying in combat, at 250 ft. above the deck? Albeit, the technology maybe new to the drum industry. Someone took the idea and applied the technology to the drum detuning issue and the drum industry.
    Now at least you are saying it properly. A technology used in Aircraft. Your last post was iplying that they actually used Tightscrews in Helicopters which is totaly ridiculous. While nylon locking nuts and bolts are nothing new, they are not the same thing as the Tight Screws. They are made of differtent alloys and use a much different type of polymer locking material including how it's arranged.


    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    Also, Slipknot from your other postings on the forum you mention that you do not remove the lug locks from your tension rods when tuning and that there is enough friction to keep the lug lock from not falling off during this process. How is it then that the increased friction applied by the lug locks so as to keep them on the tension rod during the tuning process, does not equate to the increased amount of tension needed to turn a Tightscrew tension rod? Having a lug lock on a tension rod while tuning a drum, does that not take away the "feel" of the drum while tuning? I am curious as to how that works, or am I missing something?
    I did not say i kept them on during tuning, i keep them on during tweaking. And they always come off for head changes. Normally i pull a tom out of the case, pop all the batter side lug locks off, take all the batter side rods out using a key in each hand, swap the head, put all the rods back in and finger tighten them fromt he threads under the hoop. The using a key in each hand, spin the drum in a clockwise motion skipping rods each half turn untill the head is cranked. I seat the head, then reverse the process to bring the drum down close to the normal tension by the feel of the drum keys alone. So far, other then to crack the glue ring, i have not touched the drum head. Once i have the tension close by feel, ill take a stick and while holding the drum by the mount, ill hit it. Ill put the drum down to make any adjustments to the tension and repeat that process till it's tuned. Then i re-install all the lug locks and install the tom on the kit. Once i have re-headed all the toms and mounted them. Ill try each one taking into account the tuning may have changed slightly from mounting and from the heads stretching. At this point, their may be some tweaking nessecary. If so, i do that by sound, not by feel. And that is why i can take a key and put it over the tension rod with the Lug Lock and make a minor adjustment. Usually it's less then a 1/4 turn on one or two lugs. If a head had failed or it was something major, i would pull the tom from the kit and pull the locks and replace the head.

    So no, i never said i TUNED a kit with Lug Locks installed. That would shorten the life of the locks dramatically and once again slow things down.

    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    I have tried lug locks. I found them to work fairly well, but did have some issues. But mostly I thought they were dog ugly on my drums. But that is probably not important to the touring pro or professional drummer.
    What issues did you find? And yes, looks mean nothing when you cannot accept detuning issues live. Most people only need them on snares, and nobody out front can see your snare in most cases anyhow.

    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    Just like any product, they have their place and purpose. However, if you do try Tightscrews as a product, at least give them a chance and use them for awhile before making biased decisions. One simple partial application of any product and then stating you did not like them only shows a bias.
    It's no bias, it's reality. How long do i have to try a product that clearly is going to slow me down dramatically? No matter how many times or how long i use Tightscrews, the fact that there is no way to eliminate the tension for head changes and during tuning means they are not going to work out in a serious teching situation where head changes are a daily thing. There is "Break in" period. They are designed to work by keeping constant tension on the rods. No amount of getting used to that will justify adding another 40 minutes to head changes when a product exists now that causes no grief at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    However, to the professional drum tech, they don't have much time to experiment. They go with what they know works from practical experience.
    That is true. But i am always happy to try new things. My whole motto is Work Smarter not Harder. Some things i can tell just by looking at it it will not work, but i am never afraid to try it. I ried tight screws and they simply do not work for someone who needs speed. And i would not use them on any kit because of what i mentioned above regarding rust and other issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by dlute View Post
    And yes, there are quite a few others out there that use the product. See below.
    Most of those "testimonials" are blatantly written as advertisements. And notice how your not seeing any major acts listed their? If these rods were truly a godsend, every tech i know would praise them. I have to find ANY except for one guy i saw at Fan Fair in Nashville who was tehcing a kit for some no name country guy.
    FDNY Members murdered on 9/11/01
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  7. as it is, I wept.

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    Can someone explain how rimshots will loosen a tension rod?

    I bought a Pearl MCX snare less than 2 weeks ago, brand-new, and one of the tension rods comes loose beyond fingertight, to the point where it will rattle.

    It will stay for a few hours after I tune and set the head a little, but if it sits overnight, the next morning it will be loose.
    I have never had this happen with my first EX snare.

    What is it that makes the rod come loose on this snare but none of my other cheaper snares?
    Gretsch Renown Maple in Cherry Burst
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    Pearl MCX Maple Snare in Black Silk
    14x5.5
    PDP/Gibraltar Hardware/Rack

  8. LosDientesTerribles

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    Alright, so here's what I've done.

    I replaced both heads on the drum.... top is a coated Powerstroke 3, bottom is an Evans Hazy 300 (they were out of Remo heads, had to improvise). I made sure both heads were properly seated. I tuned the drum first with a drum dial, then by ear. The drum dial readings were 89/81. Sounds just like I want it right now, nice and crisp. good action, and a solid CRACK.

    I'm going to let the heads break in, retune it in a couple of days, and then throw the lug locks on. I will report back with what happens.
    Pearl Masters Custom
    7-piece MCX408 (Pewter Glass)

    Racks: 8x7", 10x8", and 12x9"
    Floors: 14x14" and 16x16"
    Kick: 22x18"
    Snare: 14x5" Morgan Rose signature snare
    Hardware: 503C rack, DW 9000 series pedals, Zildjian cymbals

  9. LosDientesTerribles

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    Played it for about 2 hours this evening, really beat the snot out of it. Sounds great, I'm really happy with it. It held tune all night... it usually does that, so it's not unexpected. It's when I come back a few days later that it's usually dead.
    Pearl Masters Custom
    7-piece MCX408 (Pewter Glass)

    Racks: 8x7", 10x8", and 12x9"
    Floors: 14x14" and 16x16"
    Kick: 22x18"
    Snare: 14x5" Morgan Rose signature snare
    Hardware: 503C rack, DW 9000 series pedals, Zildjian cymbals

  10. LosDientesTerribles

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    Installed the lug locks on it... it seems to be holding a tune at this point. I tuned it a little higher than it was previously, that seems to help also.
    Pearl Masters Custom
    7-piece MCX408 (Pewter Glass)

    Racks: 8x7", 10x8", and 12x9"
    Floors: 14x14" and 16x16"
    Kick: 22x18"
    Snare: 14x5" Morgan Rose signature snare
    Hardware: 503C rack, DW 9000 series pedals, Zildjian cymbals

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