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  1. well im the great woodland elf

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    Default Cymbals and changing their sound

    I was wondering. What are the different techniques of changing a cymbals sound? Not only what changes them, but how. Like does the sound quality change the same way with every cymbal, like will every cymbal have a "lighter" sound than any cymbal. for instance.

    Does burying a cymbal under ground for awhile change its tone, and if so how deep do you have to bury it, and how does it change and too what extent?

    How is the sound effected when you drill holes in? And how much does the sound change with each hole? And how much does the position of each hole affect the over all tone of the cymbal? Does it make it sound brighter? lighter? And too what extent?

    these are all questions I would like everyone on the PDF too answer if anyone has any experience with these situations, or any other sound changes too any cymbals, please post with the situation, and the different outcomes that has come over time.

    This thread could even be a "Sticky" thread because it could contain alot of useful information for anyone as time goes on, acting as a guide.
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  2. Unus Deus

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    Bump...I'm interested too...also, how do you go about oxidizing...in detail...

  3. Registered User

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    just leave em in the ground they dont have to be deep. also you can put sizzlers in some of them and they will sound pretty cool.
    anyone want a mapex pro m ice blue finish
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  4. Registered User

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    I wouldn't think you have to bury it deep. And yes, of course it will change the tone. To what extent is probably based on how long it's down there.

    When holes are made, it makes the sound airy and more harsh. It will speak quicker because there's less physical body for the cymbal to vibrate. I'd guess the more near the edge the whole is, the more it will affect it.

    Hope this helps.

  5. well im the great woodland elf

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    Quote Originally Posted by metaldrummer438
    just leave em in the ground they dont have to be deep. also you can put sizzlers in some of them and they will sound pretty cool.
    Please if you have had any expierence with doing this. Please list the cymbal type, and series, how deep. The climate, what season. Roughly the perciptation if possible and any other factors that may have been involved. Please be as descriptive as possible in the hopes others will be able too change their tone as you have. ALSO what would help is what the terrain and kind of dirt, soil, or clay the cymbal is buried in. But any information helps.
    MY GHETTO FABULOUS KIT BATMAN ARMY MEMBER!
    we dont stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing


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  6. Registered User

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    i dont know the type of dirt but it was crappy pearl cymbals wasnt too deep and it was summer not too much rain.
    anyone want a mapex pro m ice blue finish
    24x18
    18x16
    16x16
    14x14
    13x9

    $$550
    pm if u want

  7. SUPREME MODULATOR

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    Burying a cymbal for a few months, isn't going to do anything to the sound. Depending on soil conditions, you may get some isolated spots of tarnish from salts and fertilizer, but trust me...you're wasting your time if you expect the thing to sound different. A cymbal has to be buried for years...I mean 50-80 years before anythings' gonna happen.

    Many years ago, some ol' jazz cat like Art Blakey or Elvin Jones mentioned in an interview, that he heard of even older jazz cats having done this. To date, no one credible or noteworthy has ever actually produced a cymbal successfully 'aged' by burying. While I'm sure it's been done by someone...someone much like you, there is no evidence to qualify or quantify the results. It's a myth...urban legend. Few drummers would ever part with a beloved cymbal long enough for the minerals and moisture in soil to affect the metal. Can it be done? Sure, but the results will vary with the condition of the soil. How long? Again, it would vary with soil condition, but rest assured...humans don't live long enough.

    The best way to 'age' a cymbal, is to quite simply...play it. Play it a lot, and do so in damp, dirty, smoky clubs with lots of blood, sweat, and beers...I mean tears...or both.

  8. well im the great woodland elf

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    Quote Originally Posted by metaldrummer438
    i dont know the type of dirt but it was crappy pearl cymbals wasnt too deep and it was summer not too much rain.
    I would imagine that size does matter as well. Please post what it was crash, hats, rides, specials. Because the thickness, and every little detail is needed. Im not meaning too sound like a big meanie head. But all these things contribute too the total sound.
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    we dont stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing


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  9. well im the great woodland elf

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    Quote Originally Posted by PYRRHO
    Burying a cymbal for a few months, isn't going to do anything to the sound. Depending on soil conditions, you may get some isolated spots of tarnish from salts and fertilizer, but trust me...you're wasting your time if you expect the thing to sound different. A cymbal has to be buried for years...I mean 50-80 years before anythings' gonna happen.

    Many years ago, some ol' jazz cat like Art Blakey or Elvin Jones mentioned in an interview, that he heard of even older jazz cats having done this. To date, no one credible or noteworthy has ever actually produced a cymbal successfully 'aged' by burying. While I'm sure it's been done by someone...someone much like you, there is no evidence to qualify or quantify the results. It's a myth...urban legend. Few drummers would ever part with a beloved cymbal long enough for the minerals and moisture in soil to affect the metal. Can it be done? Sure, but the results will vary with the condition of the soil. How long? Again, it would vary with soil condition, but rest assured...humans don't live long enough.

    The best way to 'age' a cymbal, is to quite simply...play it. Play it a lot, and do so in damp, dirty, smoky clubs with lots of blood, sweat, and beers...I mean tears...or both.
    this thread does not point out i am goign to do this nor anyone else. It is just simply an informational thread of people trying such things, giving ideas, or other ways too convert other cymbals when they do not like their over all sound.
    MY GHETTO FABULOUS KIT BATMAN ARMY MEMBER!
    we dont stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing


    WOOT I HAVE A NEW BEST FRIEND AND HIS NAME IS IHAVEAGLASSJAW

    R.I.P Kill.Joy

  10. Registered User

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    they were medium thin and they were hi hats 14 inch
    anyone want a mapex pro m ice blue finish
    24x18
    18x16
    16x16
    14x14
    13x9

    $$550
    pm if u want

  11. SUPREME MODULATOR

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    Phase I - freshly hammered and lathed; still at the factory, the cymbal's molecules are in a state of flux and it takes several weeks for the sound to develop.

    Phase II - New, hardly played; the sound has developed, but there will be some unwanted tension in the metal, producing high to very high overtones and 'metallic' ringing.

    Phase III- the cymbal after several weeks to a few months of regular playing, has been broken in; the harsh highs are diminished and response generally improves.

    Phase IV- After many...many years of regular playing, the build-up of oxides and on-set of metal-fatique causes the sound to become still warmer and usually dryer. At this point, the quality of sound becomes a very personal, subjective matter. Some will characterize the sound as being "sweet"; to others...dead.

    With a new cymbal, the best thing to do is just play it regularly.
    There is another trick to speed up the process, but I'm hesitant to get into it on this forum. It's perfectly safe...I and other drummers have been using this method for years, but to see it done may freak out some of the younger guys.

    You place the cymbal centered on your throne. With one hand holding down on the bell, and the other hand gripping the edge...just start bending it. Give it a good bend, turn it a bit, and bend again...keep going all the way around several times. This really does loosen up the cymbal and relieves some of the tension causing weird overtones. You can really bend the crap out of it....it's okay.
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  12. Registered User

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    If you want your cymbal to oxidize, burying it isn't really a good idea. Oxidation only happens in presence of water AND oxygen. So if you bury it to deep, no oxygen will touch the cymbal, and no oxidation will happen. You're best bet is to put it outside in the rain for a couple of months.
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