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  1. Registered User

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    Oct 2007
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    Default left handed drumming

    Up until today, my setup was this:

    Hi-hats on left, played open-handed (not crossing)
    Crash on right, played with right hand
    Ride on left, played with left hand

    The drums themselves were set normally (right-handed set up)

    My private drum teacher told me that I should start playing all of my set right-handed, even though I'm a lefty. He said that when you're a more experienced drummer, it doesn't matter, but when starting out drums, it does matter. He said he got this advice from a "very famous, left-handed drummer" (no name given) I first set my cymbals up this way today, and it feels really awkward, and I think he knows this.

    Do you agree with his opinion?

  2. Proud to play fast!

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    The only draw back of playing a right handed kit is that your still left footed. So you will have to play the kick with your right foot which might be a little awkward. But playing open handed does have it's advantages, that's why I'm trying to do it myself too.
    Check out my playing here: http://www.hardaxe.net/bands/141/

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  3. Satan lives within

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    Default

    If you can lead with both hands, it will certainly give you more options. Just experiment.

  4. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by And The Meek
    The only draw back of playing a right handed kit is that your still left footed. So you will have to play the kick with your right foot which might be a little awkward. But playing open handed does have it's advantages, that's why I'm trying to do it myself too.
    I've always played the actual drums set up right-handed, and I have no problem playing the bass drum with my right foot. It's just the cymbal positioning I'm awkward with.

  5. Registered User

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    Dec 2007
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    well im a south paw as well, and i never had trouble with any dominance issues in my hands or feet. As far as im concerned, set everything up the way you like it, and learn from there. I promise you, no one is gonna care if you lead lefty, there gonna care if you can get the job done.

    BTW, how long have you been playing? if its been several months at least, i would not switch up, it will be VERY confusing on your hands to start leading with your right instead of the left.

  6. Registered User

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    Oct 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by peart.neil
    well im a south paw as well, and i never had trouble with any dominance issues in my hands or feet. As far as im concerned, set everything up the way you like it, and learn from there. I promise you, no one is gonna care if you lead lefty, there gonna care if you can get the job done.

    BTW, how long have you been playing? if its been several months at least, i would not switch up, it will be VERY confusing on your hands to start leading with your right instead of the left.
    I got my first drum kit about a year ago (I'm 14), but I've been playing in a school band since I was 10.

  7. Registered User

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    Dec 2007
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    ya, if you switch now, it was be very difficult to do back beats and ghost notes and hold tempo.

    its like telling a right pitcher to pitch lefty in the all star game, wont work.

  8. Robotic Monkey Drummer

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    I lead left but I am a righty. I like it alot. Carter Beauford and Will Kennedy are both incredible drummers who play this way. I started off leading right just like everyone else, and I've also learned to play bass drum with the left foot, so I can sit on anyone's kit and play at least something. Maybe your teacher is looking out for you, but he should be trying to help you. If your teacher is gonna give you goofy advice, find a new teacher. He should be trying to get you to a point where you are a proficient drummer. IMO, a truly good teacher will try to get you up to their level and then push you even further. My friend's dad is a keyboard player and drummer, and as my friend was growing up, he was constantly being pushed by his dad to be a better drummer. As he got older and his abilities far surpassed those of his dad, his dad would still sit there and give him ideas of what to practice and MAKE him practice things that he didn't even want to. Now my buddy is an amazing drummer and he still has his dad sit there as he practices and his dad will say "play that triplet with the right foot and then play a five-eight hi-hat patern in the left and then solo over the top of it".
    Keep on with the open-handed playing.
    "That's impossible; continue"- Dwight from the Office

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  9. VW Sharan Driver

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    i am right handed, but i learnt open handed a few months ago. it takes a beat or two to get into the side reversal sometimes, but i can do it without a single change at times.

    learning open handed is cool, i can also play left footed, so i can pretty much play left, right, or open handed left and right.

    and it helps when i can't be bothered to do a double stroke in a fil, i do a single stroke with left and right really fast (almost a flam) thenlead wit the opposite hand, and i can end a fil on either, then go into left or right lead. i can do more than one side switch aswell, so i can switch to whatever side during the fil...

    it also helps to be able to do left kicks aswell. i can do L R rK, R L rK, L R lK, and R L lK triplets (LRrK fastest, then LRlK) and i can now do double stroke single stroke every 4 rolls...

    i.e. L R rK lK (or vice versa)

    and i can do triplets like (with B being both hands at same time)
    B rK lK, and B lK rK, allowing me to do triplets or 16ths/32nd(?)s incorperating 2 things at once, so i can do a triplet roll and end with china dn snare...

    it's really complicated, and takes some practice.

    but i think open handed/opposite drumming helps to learn, because the more ambidexterous, the better.
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  10. Registered User

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    Sep 2004
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    I'm left handed....and play on a predominately "righty kit" with the exception of playing open handed and having my ride on the same side as my hats. I never really thought about what was right or wrong when I set things up, I just set it up the way it was comfortable, and haven't looked back. I am thinking about taking formal lessons here in the not so distant future, and have been curious as to what an instructor would say about my set up.

  11. oknia...

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    It's hard to say. Playing righty will make things easier for you since you're already playing on a right handed kit whose tom/cymbal positions are placed in the convenience zone of the right hand.

    However, I think it's fine if you want to play open handed(left on hats, right on snare), so long as the tom/cymbal positioning doesn't interfere with your playing. I wouldn't worry too much about the kick, there are loads of left handed drummers who can kick **** well with their right foot.

    I have a left handed friend who plays open-handed on a right hand kit. He's pretty new(he's been playing for 1+ year) and he says his right foot is definitely stronger than his left. I think it's more of "getting used to" and "developing" because playing a kick doesn't require much "talent". It's all "practice". It's either that, or he's super ambidextrous. From my experience, I have yet to see a newbie who can kick perfectly on a bass drum. It's mainly practice and practice, not much of natural talent. So both your left and right feet are the same in this manner. It's just developing.

    But I think it's very important to keep the right handed drummer's set up. Don't change your set up to a left handers. This is for convenience reasons. I've seen left handed drummers who can't play a thing on a right handed set up. And lets face the fact, there are more right handers than left handers, so if you're asked to play at a venue where the kit is provided and already set up, odds are it's gonna be set up right handed style. And you're gonna be in trouble if you can't play it.

    Ultimately, it's up to you to choose whether you want to keep playing right handed or open handed style(as long as you mantain your right hand set up). Pick the best of the two. If you can't lead with your right hand, but are okay with manouvering around the kit, play open handed. And vice versa.

    Good luck man! Cheers!
    KayAun



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  12. ... approves this message.

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    Default

    I don't agree with him. What works for one person doesn't always work for everyone. I think you should play with your kit setup as comfortable as possible.

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