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  1. Registered User

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    Nov 2007
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    Default Snare rattles when I hit the toms and bass drum

    My snare rattles when I hit the toms or kick pedal/bass drum and sounds like a tin can. Someone standing in front of my kit noticed it too which is where I got the "tin can" comment from. I know it's the snare because when I turn it off, everything sounds fine. Can it be fixed by tuning? I'm using a Pearl MCX kit, 10" 12" and 16" toms with a 14x5.5 snare. Clear ambassadors on the toms but I'm getting coated ambassadors for them tommorow (free with drum set but they shipped late). If anyone can help that would be great.

  2. Registered User

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    It's not that unusual to hear the snares resonate when you hit the 12" or 13" tom because they are generally tuned in the same range as the snare. However, I'm suprised it resonates when you kick the bass drum. Try tightening up the snare itself to see if that helps. Perhaps the kick drum is tuned too high, but if the toms and kick cause sympathetic vibrations it almost sounds like the snare drum; either with tuning or tightness of the snare strainer. You can also try some sound deadening like duct tape to see if that help. Check out this link for some detailed tips that may help:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id8.html

  3. Registered User

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    i had the same problem heres how i fixed it, get puresound eq 16 strand snares and buy a pearl external clip on muffler. these things really helped my snare not rattle. also you must make sure the snare side head is really tight and the snares are tight. hope this helps
    Pearl Drums, Pearl Hardware, Paiste Cymbals, Wuhan Chinas, Evans Heads, Regal Tip and Pro-Mark Sticks



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  4. Banned

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    Aug 2004
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    batavia, ohio
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OpposingForce
    My snare rattles when I hit the toms or kick pedal/bass drum and sounds like a tin can. Someone standing in front of my kit noticed it too which is where I got the "tin can" comment from. I know it's the snare because when I turn it off, everything sounds fine. Can it be fixed by tuning? I'm using a Pearl MCX kit, 10" 12" and 16" toms with a 14x5.5 snare. Clear ambassadors on the toms but I'm getting coated ambassadors for them tommorow (free with drum set but they shipped late). If anyone can help that would be great.
    You will notice a difference with the new heads but will not be eliminated. As you said it is in the tuning and avoiding the snare wires vibrating with the tuning of the other drums. you will never be able to eliminate all of it. That's what snares do and to get them to react at 0 is impossible or you lose the snare sound.

  5. Registered User

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    Jan 2007
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    Hm. Listen very careful to your bassdrum when you hit it. Then throw off the snare strainer.. You will hear a huge difference in the sound.

    You can NEVER get rid of that sound, and I think its just a part of the drumsound. If you buy a Roland TD-20, you can also adjust the "snarebuzz"....

  6. Drummer for Asyria

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    theres a lot of things that cause the snare buzz.
    tuning
    coated heads are more prone to than clear heads
    loose snare wires
    room acoustics

    if you tune down the 2 lugs around the snare beds, and tune up the others the same amount, this has been shown to decrease this. in my case, its mostly my tuning and my acoustics. dont give up good tom sounds just for no more snare buzz. it always exists.
    I used to use this forum for quite a long time, took a break from 2010-late 2012. Hoping to be more active again!

  7. ----->

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Minneapolis
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    Even though you hear the snare buzz, chances are, nobody else will. It will get lost in the mix most likely.

    EDIT: I mean when you are playing with a band. I'd just mess with your snare tension and try the tuning methods suggested.

  8. Eat,Sleep,Dream,Drums.

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    Oct 2004
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    Seattle
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    adjusting snares
    http://www.pearldrum.com/2002_techspeak/snares.asp

    and Genes snare drum tuning tips
    http://www.pearldrum.com/2002_techspeak/tuning.asp
    Snare Drum

    Step 1

    Tune the top head following Steps 1 to 10 in the section above called, "Tuning in Opposites."

    Step 2

    As with other drums, you can tune the bottom (snare) head three ways: top and bottom the same; the bottom lower than the top; and the bottom tighter than the top.

    Hint: Most drummers tune the bottom head tighter than the top, but it's your drum... experiment.

    Tuning the bottom snare head, however, introduces a new "wrinkle," literally. Have you noticed that the bottom bearing edge of your snare drum is not flat? It has two "cut-outs," one on each side of the drum where the snares cross. These are called snare beds and they help the snares lie flat against the head to prevent buzzing.

    So what happens if you put a flat drum head on a not-so-flat surface like the bottom of a snare drum? You get wrinkles at the snare beds. There are two schools of thought regarding this. One school says, "Tune the head to itself and if you get wrinkles, so be it!" The other school says, "No big deal, take the wrinkles out!" Both ways are valid. Experiment to discover which works best for you.

    If you choose the latter approach and take the wrinkles out, the head will be tuned tighter at the snare beds. You can still tune the rest of the head to itself by using the technique described in "Tuning in Opposites" above.

    So, how tight is tight? I tune my snare head to the "G" above middle "C." I tune the batter head to the "E" or "F" below the "G" depending on my mood. A good friend of mine and a great drummer, Paul Yonemura—who has perfect pitch (he can hear any sound, for example: a brake squealing, and he'll tell you what note it is and whether it's sharp or flat)—suggested that I try these notes years ago. It turns out that he heard Ed Shaughnessy and Joe Morello tune their snare drums and with his perfect pitch was able to discern that both tuned their snare drums (at that time) to "G" on the bottom and "E" on the top (Morello) and "F" on the top (Shaughnessy). Just for fun, try these notes. Even if they're not "you," they can serve as a starting point. *The pitch of the head halfway between the snare beds.
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  9. Platinum Mist

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    Snare Buzz is a fact of life. You can minimalize it but you will never 'get rid' of it...
    2B or not 2B?- That is the Question...

  10. Registered User

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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Masters Studio
    Snare Buzz is a fact of life. You can minimalize it but you will never 'get rid' of it...
    You should never have snare buzz when kicking the bass drum and only "very little" when hitting the 12" or 13" tom (depending on the tom and snare tuning). It takes a combination of tuning and dampening and more importantly patience, but it can be done.

  11. Banned

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    Quote Originally Posted by CZXfan
    You should never have snare buzz when kicking the bass drum and only "very little" when hitting the 12" or 13" tom (depending on the tom and snare tuning). It takes a combination of tuning and dampening and more importantly patience, but it can be done.
    Why do you say the snares won't react when striking the bass drum? The very nature of a percusiion instrument is vibration and there should be reaction from everything at some point to cause snare wire reaction.

  12. Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by bebop-deluxe
    Why do you say the snares won't react when striking the bass drum? The very nature of a percusiion instrument is vibration and there should be reaction from everything at some point to cause snare wire reaction.
    I base it my own experience over the years and how my drums are set up. I can strike every drum including the kick and hear no sympathetic buzz from the snares. I do get a very slight buzz when hitting the 12" tom that decays almost instantly. Like I said previously, it's a combination of tuning, dampening and patience to take the time to get it right.

    I understand the nature of a percussive instrument, but I think it goes beyond simple vibration and is primarily related to relative pitch. I would never pretend to be an expert on the matter, just someone who draws upon experience.

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